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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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Activism for medical geographers: American, British and Canadian viewpoints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103469
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M R Greenberg
M W Rosenberg
D R Phillips
D. Schneider
Author Affiliation
Department of Urban Studies and Community Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Consumer Advocacy
Educational Status
Great Britain
Health Education - methods
Health planning
Health Policy
Humans
Minority Groups
Research
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This paper describes some of our personal efforts to launch research projects that address public health issues of interest to geographers in the United States, Canada and Britain. In pressing these agendas we have found through our experiences that there are personal and disciplinary costs associated with activism. We describe the loss of identity with geography; the frustration of trying to persuade bench scientists, corporate representatives, and government officials of the importance of our work; the loss of research time and contact with both our academic colleagues and students.
PubMed ID
2305280 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Age, period, and cohort analysis of regular dental care behavior and edentulism: a marginal approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136132
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2011;11:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kar-Yan Li
May Chun Mei Wong
Kwok-Fai Lam
Eli Schwarz
Author Affiliation
Dental Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong SAR, China.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2011;11:9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dental Care - psychology - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Prevalence
School Dentistry
Sex Factors
Social Class
Space-Time Clustering
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyze the regular dental care behavior and prevalence of edentulism in adult Danes, reported in sequential cross-sectional oral health surveys by the application of a marginal approach to consider the possible clustering effect of birth cohorts.
Data from four sequential cross-sectional surveys of non-institutionalized Danes conducted from 1975-2005 comprising 4330 respondents aged 15+ years in 9 birth cohorts were analyzed. The key study variables were seeking dental care on an annual basis (ADC) and edentulism. For the analysis of ADC, survey year, age, gender, socio-economic status (SES) group, denture-wearing, and school dental care (SDC) during childhood were considered. For the analysis of edentulism, only respondents aged 35+ years were included. Survey year, age, gender, SES group, ADC, and SDC during childhood were considered as the independent factors. To take into account the clustering effect of birth cohorts, marginal logistic regressions with an independent correlation structure in generalized estimating equations (GEE) were carried out, with PROC GENMOD in SAS software.
The overall proportion of people seeking ADC increased from 58.8% in 1975 to 86.7% in 2005, while for respondents aged 35 years or older, the overall prevalence of edentulism (35+ years) decreased from 36.4% in 1975 to 5.0% in 2005. Females, respondents in the higher SES group, in more recent survey years, with no denture, and receiving SDC in all grades during childhood were associated with higher probability of seeking ADC regularly (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21410991 View in PubMed
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Aging and health care utilization: new evidence on old fallacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235825
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M L Barer
R G Evans
C. Hertzman
J. Lomas
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
British Columbia
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Abstract
The proportion of the population in the older age groups will increase dramatically over the next four decades. Furthermore, current per capita rates of hospital and medical care utilization rise sharply with age beyond the age of about 55. However, demographic trends alone do not imply health care cost increases in excess of what is supportable by normal economic growth. A 'cost crisis' will only occur if per capita rates of utilization among the elderly increase faster than for the general population. In this paper we present some descriptive data from published sources suggesting that this has been the case over the recent past in one Canadian province. The implications for the policy debate over the effects of an aging population are discussed.
PubMed ID
3616679 View in PubMed
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The AIDS epidemic in Sweden: changes in awareness, attitudes and behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8665
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1988;16(2):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Brorsson
C. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1988;16(2):67-71
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - therapy - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Disease Outbreaks
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
Questionnaire surveys concerning awareness, attitudes and beliefs about HIV virus and AIDS in Sweden were conducted in March/April of 1986, February/March of 1987, and May 1987. The number of individuals compared in the three surveys were 2,622, 1,805 and 707 respectively. The surveys indicate that the general public views the AIDS epidemic with growing concern. They feel that researchers and public officials cannot effectively combat the problem. To a growing extent they feel that it is up to individuals to appropriately adapt their behavior if we are to slow the spread of the disease, and to a certain extent changes in sexual practices also seem to have happened. Changes in awareness, attitudes and beliefs have accelerated since the start in March, 1987 of the Swedish AIDS information campaign.
PubMed ID
3387937 View in PubMed
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AIDS in the US: a decade of fear and cruel indifference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220137
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Oct 1;149(7):1019-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1993

Alcohol-related policy measures in Ontario: who supports what and to what degree?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195320
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Anglin
L. Kavanagh
N. Giesbrecht
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Addiction Research Foundation Site, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2S1. lise_anglin@camh.net
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Educational Status
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Ontario
Policy Making
Public Health
Public Opinion
Abstract
Using 1998 provincial survey data (n = 1,205), the authors examine responses to 7 items concerning public opinion on alcohol-related policy in Ontario. The purpose of the study is to get a sense of overall public opinion on certain topical policy-related measures and to see whether this opinion is predicted by demographic characteristics of respondents (sex, age and self-reported drinking pattern). Cross-tabulations of opinion items with demographic variables revealed strong majority support for the status quo with regard to number of liquor and beer stores, beer and liquor store hours, and prohibition of the sale of alcohol in corner stores. A somewhat less robust majority also supported the status quo for alcohol taxes and legal drinking age. Among the demographic groups, high-risk heavy drinkers stood out for their greater support of relaxation of controls and this finding was confirmed by means of logistic regression. The majority of all groups, except frequent bar-goers, liked the idea of warning labels on alcoholic beverage containers. The authors conclude that, according to these survey data, policy initiatives towards greater access to alcohol, such as extended liquor store hours and sale of alcohol in corner stores, are not mandated by the majority of the population of Ontario.
PubMed ID
11257985 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among college students: an international perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78170
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 May;20(3):213-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Karam Elie
Kypri Kypros
Salamoun Mariana
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, St George Hospital University Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. egkaram@idraac.org
Source
Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2007 May;20(3):213-21
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Risk
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The present review of published articles during 2005-2006 on alcohol use among college students in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe and South America assesses the prevalence of alcohol use, hazardous drinking and related problems, and reviews the effectiveness of intervention methods and implications for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: Research on alcohol use and related problems in college students is lacking in many regions of the world. We identified 26 papers in peer-reviewed journals, from Australia, Brazil, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Lebanon, New Zealand, Nigeria, Sweden, The Netherlands and Turkey. SUMMARY: More comprehensive studies with systematic methodologies in the world regions reviewed here are needed to yield representative results on alcohol use and related risk and protective factors in college settings. College students in many countries are at elevated risk for heavy drinking, with serious immediate health risks, such as drink-driving and other substance use; and longer term risks, such as alcohol dependence. The prevalence of hazardous drinking in Australasia, Europe and South America appears similar to that in North America, but is lower in Africa and Asia. Alcohol policies should be reviewed and prevention programmes initiated in light of research evidence, for this high-risk population.
PubMed ID
17415072 View in PubMed
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"A magnet for curious adolescents": the perceived dangers of an open drug scene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93377
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sandberg Sveinung
Pedersen Willy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Bergen, Rosenbergsgaten 39, 5015 Bergen, Norway. sveinung.sandberg@sos.uib.no
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Behavior, Addictive
Drug and Narcotic Control
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Public Health
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Social Distance
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 the police closed Plata, an open drug scene in the midst of Oslo. The most important argument for the closure was that the drug scene made it easier for curious, city-dwelling adolescents to start using drugs. This research sought to assess this assumption. Ethnographic research methods including twenty 2-hr field observations and qualitative semi-structures interviews were employed. Interviews were conducted with 30 adolescents in the centre of Oslo, as well as with 10 former drug users, three police officers and three field workers. We were also given access to police statistics and authorised to do our own analysis of the material. The most important result was that adolescents seemed rather to avoid than to be attracted to this open drug scene in Oslo. Based on the presentation of qualitative data we suggest that this was due to the social definition of the drug scene. Because they experienced a great social distance between themselves and the regulars at the open drug scene, adolescents seemed to avoid Plata. Moreover, the scene was symbolically associated with heroin and injection as the route of administration, which had low prestige among the adolescents. Despite these findings, adolescents' recruitment to drug use was the key issue in the political debate following the closure. We point to the shared rhetorical interest among important institutional actors in framing the issue in this way. The argument was also embedded in widely shared public representations of adolescents and drug users as passive and irrational.
PubMed ID
18378132 View in PubMed
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268 records – page 1 of 27.