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Adolescent smoking and exposure to tobacco marketing under a tobacco advertising ban: Findings from 2 Norwegian national samples

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67227
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
  1 website  
Author
Braverman, MT
Aarø, LE
Author Affiliation
Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, Davis 95616, USA. mtbraverman@ucdavis.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Jul;94(7):1230-1238
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Advertising - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Female
Friends - psychology
Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Mass Media
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Tobacco Industry - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We examined the extent to which adolescents in Norway have been exposed to tobacco marketing despite an existing ban, and whether exposure is related to their current smoking or expectations they will smoke in the future. METHODS: Questionnaires were administered to nationally representative systematic samples of Norwegian youths aged 13 to 15 years in 1990 (n = 4282) and 1995 (n = 4065). RESULTS: About half in each cohort reported exposure to marketing. Youths reporting exposure were significantly more likely to be current smokers and to expect to be smokers at 20 years of age, after control for important social influence predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents' current smoking and future smoking expectations are linked to marketing exposure even in limited settings, suggesting the need for comprehensive controls to eliminate the function of marketing in promoting adolescent smoking.
PubMed ID
15226148 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Ethics in public health research: Changing patterns of mortality among American Indians

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87439
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2008 Mar;98(3):404-411
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
  1 website  
Author
Kunitz, SJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Community & Preventive Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, PO Box 278969, Rochester, NY 14627-8969, USA. stephen_kunitz@urmc.rochester.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2008 Mar;98(3):404-411
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Ethics, Research
Female
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Program Evaluation
Public Health
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
Mortality rates for American Indians (including Alaska Natives) declined for much of the 20th century, but data published by the Indian Health Service indicate that since the mid-1980s, age-adjusted deaths for this population have increased both in absolute terms and compared with rates for the White American population. This increase appears to be primarily because of the direct and indirect effects of type 2 diabetes. Despite increasing appropriations for the Special Diabetes Program for Indians, per capita expenditures for Indian health, including third-party reimbursements, remain substantially lower than those for other Americans and, when adjusted for inflation, have been essentially unchanged since the early 1990s. I argue that inadequate funding for health services has contributed significantly to the increased death rate.
PubMed ID
18235064 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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A First Nations voice in the present creates healing in the future

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4331
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96 Suppl 1:S13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-Feb 2005
  1 website  
Author
MacKinnon, M
Author Affiliation
Romanow Joint Working Group, Research and Policy Development Unit, Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, 200-260 St. Mary Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3C 0M6. mmackinnon@manitobachiefs.com
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96 Suppl 1:S13-6
Date
Jan-Feb 2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Health Policy - trends
Health Services, Indigenous - trends
Humans
Indians, North American
Life expectancy
Male
Manitoba
Public Health - trends
Abstract
This paper discusses the urgency for change and improvements in health policy determined by the exploding demographics and inequities in the health status of First Nation people. A historical overview of health services for First Nation clients was conducted as set out through government legislation and health and social policies. Until WWII ended, the federal government provided assistance to First Nations through Indian Affairs branches of several departments. This responsibility was gradually transferred to National Health and Welfare. In 1962, the federal government established a Medical Services Branch, later renamed First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, and mandated to provide services to First Nation clients, which fell outside the provincial jurisdiction of health care. Initially centered on public health priorities, services have expanded to include primary health care, dental, mental health, environmental health, home and continuing care, and Non-Insured Health Benefits. The Romanow Report substantiated the urgency for health policy improvements voiced by many First Nations. However, it generalized Aboriginal issues in health care on a national front. Furthermore, its recommendations were specific to health care providers and delivery models and did not address the social and spiritual determinants of health, which are fundamental to a First Nations' holistic approach. Health planners must think holistically, considering traditional and westernized medicine, First Nations' values, priorities and government systems, and present and evolving health systems. Universities, health authorities, provinces and the federal government are continually developing new research and health models, which will also need consideration. Further, the imperative of involving community-level input must be recognized.
PubMed ID
15686147 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Indigenous health leadership: Protocols, policy, and practice

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265644
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2013;11(3):565-578
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 website  
Author
Gomes, T
Young Leon, A
Brown, L
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health. 2013;11(3):565-578
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal community health
Cultural Competency
Cultural harm restorative practices
Culturally relevant health education
Health Policy
Human rights health care practice
Indigenous knowledge protocols
Indigenous pre-research protocols
Protection of Indigenous knowledge
Abstract
This article describes the process of the Vancouver Coastal Health's Aboriginal Health Practice Council (AHPC) who provide policy direction to Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH). The AHPC operates within unceded territories in what is now known as British Columbia, Canada. The council consists of Aboriginal Elders, knowledge keepers, community members, and VCH staff who work collaboratively to develop and implement best health care practices for Aboriginal people. Working within local Indigenous protocols to create policy for service delivery this council operates under the assumption that to improve health outcomes it is incumbent for VCH to create appropriate methods of access to Aboriginal health practices. The council facilitates Aboriginal leadership in policy development informing health care practitioners on how they can support Aboriginal clients' right to culturally appropriate Aboriginal health care services. The article describes the processes employed by the Aboriginal Health Practice Council. These processes offer a methodology for non-Indigenous organizations serving Aboriginal peoples to implement Indigenous community-based research principles, protocols, and practices central in the provision of effective, culturally appropriate health care.
Online Resources
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Lady beetles and public health research: Geographic and population scales

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69568
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1995 May;85(5):735-736
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
  1 website  
Author
Wallace, D
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1995 May;85(5):735-736
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Policy
Humans
New York City - epidemiology
Public Health
Research
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Public health ideally concerns scales of the individual, groups of individuals, and functional populations. When only individual-level attributes are examined in public health research, results may be more misleading than when so-called poor-quality population-level data are analyzed.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Feb;86(2):267-268
PubMed ID
7733444 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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