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Effects of tobacco control policy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298020
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(suppl_2):14-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Marine Gambaryan
Aaron Reeves
Alexander Deev
Marina Popovich
Oxana Drapkina
Andrew Snell
David Stuckler
Kristina Mauer-Stender
Bente Mikkelsen
Sergey Boytsov
Author Affiliation
National Medical Research Centre for Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(suppl_2):14-16
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Prevalence
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Policy
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Prevention
Taxes
Tobacco - adverse effects
Tobacco Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Products - adverse effects - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
According to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey carried out in Russia in 2009, the country had one of the highest smoking prevalence rates in Europe. In response to this health and economic burden, Russia implemented a comprehensive Tobacco Control Law (TCL) in 2013, which has been associated with a 21.5% relative decline in adult smoking prevalence in 2016 compared with 2009. This study tests the impact of the TCL on cardiovascular disease (CVD) related health outcomes, including morbidity and mortality.
The study evaluated the TCL as an intervention in a natural experiment during the period 2003-2015. A synthetic control was created as a comparator, using data from countries that did not have a comparable comprehensive tobacco control intervention. Changes in trends in CVD outcomes - hospital discharge rates (HDRs) and standardized death rates (SDRs) - were then compared to test for an impact associated with the TCL.
Pre-intervention trends in CVD-related HDRs were similar between Russia and the synthetic control, but became divergent after the TCL with greater benefit observed in Russia. This implies a beneficial impact of the TCL on CVD related morbidity in the Russian population. Whilst SDRs continued to reduce in both Russia and the control, the impact of TCL is less clear.
This study provides further evidence to support comprehensive tobacco control in line with the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). Alongside a reduction in tobacco consumption, smoking-related CVD morbidity appears to benefit quite soon after implementation, whilst smoking-related deaths might need a longer post-intervention period to be detectable.
PubMed ID
30371836 View in PubMed
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Identifying and Reducing Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes Among American Indians and Alaskan Natives Using Public Health, Mental Healthcare and Legal Perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300411
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2018 01; 45(1):5-14
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Hannah E Payne
Michalyn Steele
Jennie L Bingham
Chantel D Sloan
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University, 2048 Life Sciences Building, Provo, UT, 84602, USA.
Source
Adm Policy Ment Health. 2018 01; 45(1):5-14
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care
Evidence-Based Practice
Federal Government
Financing, Government - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Healthcare Financing
Humans
Indians, North American
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health services
Public Health
United States
United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Abstract
The purpose of this paper was to investigate disparities in mental healthcare delivery in American Indian/Alaska Native populations from three perspectives: public health, legal policy and mental healthcare and provide evidence-based recommendations toward reducing those disparities. Data on mental health funding to tribes were obtained from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. As a result of analysis of these data, vital statistics and current literature, we propose three recommendations to reduce mental health disparities. First, where possible, increase mental health funding opportunities for federally-recognized tribes. Second, model funding practices on principles of tribal self-determination. Finally, support diverse interventions that are culturally-based and culturally-appropriate.
PubMed ID
28144762 View in PubMed
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Justified by What? Three Ways to Provide an Ethical Basis for Neonatal Policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299878
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 09; 142(Suppl 1):S590-S592
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
09-2018
Author
Lars Ursin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; and St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway lars.ursin@ntnu.no.
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 09; 142(Suppl 1):S590-S592
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Infant Care - ethics - trends
Infant, Extremely Premature - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - ethics - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In this article, I identify 3 ways of justifying neonatal policies of when to provide life-saving treatment to infants who were born extremely premature: by appealing to universal principles or rights, to considerations of the best interests of the children, or to considerations of the best interests of the families. I go on to show how each of these justifications can be used to characterize the discourse on neonatal policies in 1 of the Scandinavian countries.
PubMed ID
30171146 View in PubMed
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Managers' experience of success criteria and barriers to implementing mobile radiography services in nursing homes in Norway: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296614
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 04 25; 18(1):301
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-25-2018
Author
Elin Kjelle
Kristin Bakke Lysdahl
Hilde Merete Olerud
Aud Mette Myklebust
Author Affiliation
Department of Optometry, Radiography and Lighting Design, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University College of Southeast Norway, Postboks 235, 3603, Kongsberg, Norway. Elin.Kjelle@usn.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 04 25; 18(1):301
Date
04-25-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Attitude of Health Personnel
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Diffusion of Innovation
Equipment and Supplies Utilization
Health Policy
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inventions
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Point-of-Care Systems - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Radiography - statistics & numerical data
Telemedicine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In order to meet the future challenges posed by ageing populations, new technology, telemedicine and a more personalized healthcare system are needed. Earlier research has shown mobile radiography services to be highly beneficial for nursing home residents in addition to being cost-effective. Despite the benefits, mobile radiography services are uncommon in Europe and Norway. The purpose of this study was to explore success criteria and barriers in the process of implementing mobile radiography services, from the point of view of the hospital and municipal managers.
Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted with managers from five hospitals and six municipalities in Norway where mobile radiography services had been implemented. Core issues in the interview guide were barriers and facilitators in the different phases of implementation. The framework method for thematic analysis was used for analysing the data inductively in a research team.
Five main categories were developed through the success criteria and barriers experienced by the participants: national health policy, regional and municipal policy and conditions, inter-organizational implementation projects, experienced outcome, and professional skills and personal characteristics. The categories were allocated into three higher-order classifications: macro, meso and micro levels. The main barriers experienced by the managers were financial, procedural and structural. In particular, the reimbursement system, lack of management across healthcare levels and the lack of compatible information systems acted as barriers. The main facilitators were external funding, enthusiastic individuals in the organizations and good collaboration between hospitals and municipalities.
The managers experienced financial, structural and procedural barriers. The main success criteria in the process were external funding, and the support and engagement from the individuals in the organizations. This commitment was mainly facilitated by the intuitive appeal of mobile radiography. Changes in healthcare management and in the financial system might facilitate services across healthcare levels. In addition, compatible information systems across healthcare levels are needed in order to facilitate the use of new technology and mobile services.
PubMed ID
29699547 View in PubMed
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Market-orienting reforms in rural health care in Sweden: how can equity in access be preserved?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296545
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 17; 17(1):123
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-17-2018
Author
Linn Kullberg
Paula Blomqvist
Ulrika Winblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Linn.Kullberg@pubcare.uu.se.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 17; 17(1):123
Date
08-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Care Sector - standards
Health Equity - standards
Health Policy
Humans
Rural Health
Rural Health Services - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Health care provision in rural and urban areas faces different challenges. In Sweden, health care provision has been predominantly public and equitable access to care has been pursued mainly through public planning and coordination. This is to ensure that health needs are met in the same manner in all parts of the country, including rural or less affluent areas. However, a marketization of the health care system has taken place during recent decades and the publicly planned system has been partially replaced by a new market logic, where private providers guided by financial concerns can decide independently where to establish their practices. In this paper, we explore the effects of marketization policies on rural health care provision by asking how policy makers in rural counties have managed to combine two seemingly contradictory health policy goals: to create conditions for market competition among health care providers and to ensure equal access to health care for all patients, including those living in rural and remote areas.
A qualitative case study within three counties in the northern part of Sweden, characterized by vast rural areas, was carried out. Legal documents, the "accreditation documents" regulating the health care quasi-markets in the three counties were analyzed. In addition, interviews with policy makers in the three county councils, representing the political majority, the opposition, and the political administration were conducted in April and May 2013.
The findings demonstrate the difficulties involved in introducing market dynamics in health care provision in rural areas, as these reforms not only undermined existing resource allocation systems based on health needs but also undercut attempts by local policy makers to arrange for care provision in remote locations through planning and coordination.
Provision of health care in rural areas is not well suited for market reforms introducing competition, as this may undermine the goal of equity in access to health care, even in a publicly financed health care system.
PubMed ID
30119665 View in PubMed
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Measuring, Reporting, and Rewarding Quality of Care in 5 Nations: 5 Policy Levers to Enhance Hospital Quality Accountability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292720
Source
Milbank Q. 2017 03; 95(1):136-183
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
Christoph Pross
Alexander Geissler
Reinhard Busse
Author Affiliation
Berlin University of Technology.
Source
Milbank Q. 2017 03; 95(1):136-183
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
England
Germany
Health Policy
Humans
Netherlands
Quality Indicators, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Reimbursement, Incentive - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Social Responsibility
Sweden
United States
Notes
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PubMed ID
28266076 View in PubMed
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National policies for the promotion of physical activity and healthy nutrition in the workplace context: a behaviour change wheel guided content analysis of policy papers in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289915
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 08 02; 18(1):87
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-02-2017
Author
Tuija Seppälä
Nelli Hankonen
Eveliina Korkiakangas
Johanna Ruusuvuori
Jaana Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, Linna, -33014, Tampere, FI, Finland. tuija.seppala@helsinki.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 08 02; 18(1):87
Date
08-02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Exercise
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet
Humans
Occupational Health
Workplace
Abstract
Health policy papers disseminate recommendations and guidelines for the development and implementation of health promotion interventions. Such documents have rarely been investigated with regard to their assumed mechanisms of action for changing behaviour. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and Behaviour Change Techniques (BCT) Taxonomy have been used to code behaviour change intervention descriptions, but to our knowledge such "retrofitting" of policy papers has not previously been reported. This study aims first to identify targets, mediators, and change strategies for physical activity (PA) and nutrition behaviour change in Finnish policy papers on workplace health promotion, and second to assess the suitability of the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) approach for this purpose.
We searched all national-level health policy papers effectual in Finland in August 2016 focusing on the promotion of PA and/or healthy nutrition in the workplace context (n = 6). Policy recommendations targeting employees' nutrition and PA including sedentary behaviour (SB) were coded using BCW, TDF, and BCT Taxonomy.
A total of 125 recommendations were coded in the six policy papers, and in two additional documents referenced by them. Psychological capability, physical opportunity, and social opportunity were frequently identified (22%, 31%, and 24%, respectively), whereas physical capability was almost completely absent (1%). Three TDF domains (knowledge, skills, and social influence) were observed in all papers. Multiple intervention functions and BCTs were identified in all papers but several recommendations were too vague to be coded reliably. Influencing individuals (46%) and changing the physical environment (44%) were recommended more frequently than influencing the social environment (10%).
The BCW approach appeared to be useful for analysing the content of health policy papers. Paying more attention to underlying assumptions regarding behavioural change processes may help to identify neglected aspects in current policy, and to develop interventions based on recommendations, thus helping to increase the impact of policy papers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28764754 View in PubMed
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"The citizen is stepping into a new role"-Policy interpretations of patient and public involvement in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298303
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2018 03; 26(2):e304-e311
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Marjaana Jones
Ilkka Pietilä
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2018 03; 26(2):e304-e311
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Finland
Health Personnel
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
Involving patients and the public in healthcare decision-making is on the policy agenda in several countries. The aim of our study was to describe and analyse the development of patient and public involvement from a policy perspective. We argue that the language of health policies can influence both the aims and the development of involvement methods. In this study health policy documents, which have guided the development of patient and public involvement in Finland have been analysed using methods of Membership Categorisation Analysis. This has enabled us to explore how health policy documents categorise patients and the wider public in relation to involvement and orientate the involvement activities in which people are able to participate. Different set of abilities, expectations, responsibilities and opportunities is attached to the categories of patient, risk group, service user, customer and expert. Health policy documents often equate involvement with choice making by service users and customers; or as involvement in service development by experts. In both of these cases, involvement is depicted as an individual activity that requires personal responsibility and specialist knowledge. Although involvement opportunities have overall increased, they are primarily available to people that are "participation ready" and able to adopt roles promoted in policies. Health policy documents produce one interpretation of involvement, nevertheless it is important that diverse groups of patients, the public and health professionals participate in the discussion and express their views, which may differ from those of policy makers.
PubMed ID
29156490 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.