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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Aging and health care utilization: new evidence on old fallacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235825
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M L Barer
R G Evans
C. Hertzman
J. Lomas
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
British Columbia
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Abstract
The proportion of the population in the older age groups will increase dramatically over the next four decades. Furthermore, current per capita rates of hospital and medical care utilization rise sharply with age beyond the age of about 55. However, demographic trends alone do not imply health care cost increases in excess of what is supportable by normal economic growth. A 'cost crisis' will only occur if per capita rates of utilization among the elderly increase faster than for the general population. In this paper we present some descriptive data from published sources suggesting that this has been the case over the recent past in one Canadian province. The implications for the policy debate over the effects of an aging population are discussed.
PubMed ID
3616679 View in PubMed
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Flat on your back or back to your flat? Sources of increased hospital services utilization among the elderly in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103843
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(7):819-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Hertzman
I R Pulcins
M L Barer
R G Evans
G M Anderson
J. Lomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(7):819-28
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Female
Health Policy
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Morbidity
Sex Factors
Abstract
Between 1969 and 1985, the British Columbia hospital system allocated an increasing proportion of the province's total hospital days to elderly patients who stayed for 60 days or more. By 1985/86, long stay patients accounted for almost 50% of all days. In this paper, we explore the diagnoses which contributed the greatest number of patient days of increase among the elderly as a first step in evaluating the appropriateness of this response to the pressures of an aging population. Patient days of increase were not distributed smoothly across a large number of diagnoses, but could be explained by a small number of chronic conditions. Most important were conditions related to senility and senile dementia, the chronic sequelae of heart disease and stroke, and persons awaiting admission to adequate facilities elsewhere. Eighty percent of the increases were seen in extended care and rehabilitation beds and 20% in acute care beds. Seventy-seven percent of the increased patient days were attributable to females and only 23% to males. Since the major sources of increase in patient days were not related to conditions for which new, effective hospital care modalities are available, they call into question the appropriateness of the system's response to the health care needs of the elderly population.
PubMed ID
2107578 View in PubMed
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Toward integrated medical resource policies for Canada: 1. Background, process and perceived problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224436
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 1;146(3):347-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1992
Author
M L Barer
G L Stoddart
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Feb 1;146(3):347-51
Date
Feb-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Economics, Medical
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Foreign Medical Graduates - supply & distribution
Health Policy
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Physicians - supply & distribution
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Feb 2;1(7849):141-64129717
PubMed ID
1544045 View in PubMed
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Toward integrated medical resource policies for Canada: 4. Graduates of foreign medical schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223870
Source
CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1992
Author
M L Barer
G L Stoddart
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1549-54
Date
May-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Foreign Medical Graduates - standards
Health Manpower
Health Policy
Health Resources
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Personnel Selection
Refugees
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Jan 1;140(1):68-92909278
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Mar 1;146(5):697-7001562942
PubMed ID
1571866 View in PubMed
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Toward integrated medical resource policies for Canada: 11. Improving effectiveness and efficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222627
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Dec 1;147(11):1653-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1992
Author
G L Stoddart
M L Barer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1992 Dec 1;147(11):1653-60
Date
Dec-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Efficiency
Health planning
Health Policy
Health Resources
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Misuse
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician's Role
Policy Making
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Feb 1;146(3):347-511544045
Cites: Atlantic. 1992 Mar;269(3):98-102, 105-10611651349
Cites: Med Care. 1990 Mar;28(3):201-202179649
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Oct 25;323(17):1202-42215598
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 Mar 2;320(9):571-72492637
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1989 Aug;24(3):351-4072668237
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Apr 19;310(16):1049-516424009
Cites: Socioecon Plann Sci. 1983;17(4):199-20910262534
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1991;12:481-5181904728
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1991;12:41-652049143
Cites: Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):5-122103871
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Sep 15;143(6):485-902119873
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1990 Oct 25;323(17):1173-72215595
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Dec 1;143(11):1193-92224696
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Jul 15;143(2):98-1002364343
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 Aug 15;141(4):283-62504478
Cites: Med Care. 1989 Aug;27(8):763-712755218
Cites: CMAJ. 1986 Feb 15;134(4):333-403080215
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Oct 15;129(8):822-76616387
Cites: Qual Assur Health Care. 1990;2(1):89-1092103875
PubMed ID
1483216 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.