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Aging and health care utilization: new evidence on old fallacies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235825
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M L Barer
R G Evans
C. Hertzman
J. Lomas
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;24(10):851-62
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
British Columbia
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Abstract
The proportion of the population in the older age groups will increase dramatically over the next four decades. Furthermore, current per capita rates of hospital and medical care utilization rise sharply with age beyond the age of about 55. However, demographic trends alone do not imply health care cost increases in excess of what is supportable by normal economic growth. A 'cost crisis' will only occur if per capita rates of utilization among the elderly increase faster than for the general population. In this paper we present some descriptive data from published sources suggesting that this has been the case over the recent past in one Canadian province. The implications for the policy debate over the effects of an aging population are discussed.
PubMed ID
3616679 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism treatment in Canada: a review of current programs and policy issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244501
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
A E Reid
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - economics - rehabilitation - therapy
Canada
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Language
Ontario
Sex Factors
Abstract
An overview of the specialized alcoholism treatment field in Canada is presented based on a 1976 national survey of 338 programs. Descriptive information on these programs is presented to provide an understanding of the state of current treatment efforts and to identify emersent policy issues in this field. Programs activities are described under six headings: (1) the pattern of program development, (2) types of treatment agencies, (3) treatment capacity and utilization, (4) the characteristics of persons using treatment services, (5) approaches employed in treatment, and (6) program costs and financing of alcoholism treatment. Findings from the national study are related to three policy issues: access, quality, and cost. The need for future research aimed at these issues is discussed.
PubMed ID
7287245 View in PubMed
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Explaining variations in cesarean section rates: patients, facilities or policies?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239216
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Feb 1;132(3):253-6, 259
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1985
Author
G M Anderson
J. Lomas
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Feb 1;132(3):253-6, 259
Date
Feb-1-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth rate
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section - utilization
Dystocia - diagnosis
Female
Fetal Distress - diagnosis
Health Policy
Humans
Ontario
Pregnancy
Reoperation
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Using overall rates of cesarean section and either rates of diagnosis or rates of cesarean section for the four main indications for this procedure, we analysed the variations among teaching and community hospitals in four of Ontario's six regions. The rates varied substantially in both 1979 and 1982, with the overall rate for cesarean section in 1982 being 17.1 to 21.0 per 100 deliveries in the teaching hospitals and 16.5 to 19.7 in the community hospitals. The rate of diagnosis of dystocia varied up to threefold in the teaching hospitals and up to twofold in the community hospitals. Fetal distress was diagnosed at even more variables rates. The rate of repeat cesarean section varied most in the teaching hospitals, whereas the rate of cesarean section for breech presentation varied significantly in the community and the teaching hospitals in 1982 but only in the community hospitals in 1979. Nearly all the rates increased between 1979 and 1982. Differences in patient characteristics and in availability of resources appeared less important in explaining these rate variations than differences in clinical policy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3967160 View in PubMed
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