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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Alcoholism treatment in Canada: a review of current programs and policy issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244501
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
A E Reid
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - economics - rehabilitation - therapy
Canada
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Language
Ontario
Sex Factors
Abstract
An overview of the specialized alcoholism treatment field in Canada is presented based on a 1976 national survey of 338 programs. Descriptive information on these programs is presented to provide an understanding of the state of current treatment efforts and to identify emersent policy issues in this field. Programs activities are described under six headings: (1) the pattern of program development, (2) types of treatment agencies, (3) treatment capacity and utilization, (4) the characteristics of persons using treatment services, (5) approaches employed in treatment, and (6) program costs and financing of alcoholism treatment. Findings from the national study are related to three policy issues: access, quality, and cost. The need for future research aimed at these issues is discussed.
PubMed ID
7287245 View in PubMed
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Communicating with the public, communicating with each other.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201451
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS279-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
C. DeCoster
R J Currie
D. Turner
L L Roos
E. Minish
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Center for Health Policy and Evaluation, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS279-90
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Communication
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
Interprofessional Relations
Manitoba
Mass Media
Public Relations
Publishing
Writing
PubMed ID
10409015 View in PubMed
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Managing health services: how the Population Health Information System (POPULIS) works for policymakers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201452
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS27-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
N P Roos
C. Black
L L Roos
N. Frohlich
C. DeCoster
C. Mustard
M D Brownell
M. Shanahan
P. Fergusson
F. Toll
K C Carriere
C. Burchill
R. Fransoo
L. MacWilliam
B. Bogdanovic
D. Friesen
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS27-41
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Care Rationing - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Manitoba
Models, Theoretical
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Abstract
University-based researchers in Manitoba, Canada, have used administrative data routinely collected as part of the national health insurance plan to design an integrated database and population-based health information system. This information system is proving useful to policymakers for answering such questions as: Which populations need more physician services? Which need fewer? Are high-risk populations poorly served? or do they have poor health outcomes despite being well served? Does high utilization represent overuse? or is it related to high need? More specifically, this system provides decision makers with the capability to make critical comparisons across regions and subregions of residents' health status, socioeconomic risk characteristics and use of hospitals, nursing homes, and physicians. The system permits analyses of demographic changes, expenditure patterns, and hospital performance in relation to the population served. The integrated database has also facilitated outcomes research across hospitals and countries, utilization review within a single hospital, and longitudinal research on health reform. The discussion highlights the strengths of integrated population-based information in analyzing the health care system and raising important questions about the relationship between health care and health.
PubMed ID
10409014 View in PubMed
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Population health and health care use: an information system for policy makers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213586
Source
Milbank Q. 1996;74(1):3-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N P Roos
C. Black
N. Frohlich
C. DeCoster
M. Cohen
D J Tataryn
C A Mustard
L L Roos
F. Toll
K C Carrière
C A Burchill
L. MacWilliam
B. Bogdanovic
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, Winnipeg.
Source
Milbank Q. 1996;74(1):3-31
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Database Management Systems - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Population Surveillance - methods
Public Health
Abstract
University-based researchers in Manitoba, Canada, have used administrative data routinely collected as part of the national health insurance plan to design a population-based health information system (POPULIS). Decision-makers can use this system to make critical comparisons across regions of residents' health status, socioeconomic risk characteristics, and use of hospitals, nursing homes, and physicians. Policy makers have found this information system useful in providing answers to questions they are often asked: Which populations need more physician services? Which need fewer? Are high-risk populations poorly served or do they have poor health outcomes despite being well served? Does high utilization represent overuse or is it related to high need? Three commentaries follow.
Notes
Comment In: Milbank Q. 1996;74(1):37-418596522
Comment In: Milbank Q. 1996;74(1):33-68596521
PubMed ID
8596520 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.