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Differences in socioeconomic and gender inequalities in tobacco smoking in Denmark and Sweden; a cross sectional comparison of the equity effect of different public health policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146149
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Frida Eek
Per-Olof Ostergren
Finn Diderichsen
Niels K Rasmussen
Ingelise Andersen
Kontie Moussa
Mathias Grahn
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. frida.eek@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Denmark and Sweden are considered to be countries of rather similar socio-political type, but public health policies and smoking habits differ considerably between the two neighbours. A study comparing mechanisms behind socioeconomic inequalities in tobacco smoking, could yield information regarding the impact of health policy and -promotion in the two countries.
Cross-sectional comparisons of socioeconomic and gender differences in smoking behaviour among 6 995 Danish and 13 604 Swedish persons aged 18-80 years.
The prevalence of smoking was higher in Denmark compared to Sweden. The total attributable fraction (TAF) of low education regarding daily smoking was 36% for Danish men and 35% for Danish women, and 32% and 46%, respectively, for Swedish men and women. TAF of low education regarding continued smoking were 16.2% and 15.8% for Danish men and women, and 11.0% and 18.8% for Swedish men and women, respectively. The main finding of the study was that the socioeconomic patterning of smoking, based on level of education and expressed as the relative contribution to the total burden of smoking exposure, was rather different in Sweden and Denmark. Moreover, these differences were modified by gender and age. As a general pattern, socioeconomic differences in Sweden tended to contribute more to the total burden of this habit among women, especially in the younger age groups. In men, the patterns were much more similar between the two countries. Regarding continued smoking/unsuccessful quitting, the patterns were similar for women, but somewhat different for men. Here we found that socioeconomic differences contributed more to overall continued smoking in Danish men, especially in the middle-age and older age strata.
The results imply that Swedish anti-smoking policy and/or implemented measures have been less effective in a health equity perspective among the younger generation of women, but more effective among men, compared to Danish policy implementation. The results also raises the more general issue regarding the possible need for a trade-off principle between overall population efficacy versus equity efficacy of anti-tobacco, as well as general public health policies and intervention strategies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20064219 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health Inequality--determinants and policies. Foreword.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117572
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(8 Suppl):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Finn Diderichsen
Ingelise Andersen
Celie Manuel
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Elsa Bach
Mikkel Baadsgaard
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Finn Kenneth Hansen
Bernard Jeune
Torben Jørgensen
Jes Søgaard
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(8 Suppl):10-1
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
23147862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health Inequality--determinants and policies. Summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117573
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(8 Suppl):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Dec 17;169(51):4448-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-2007
Author
Finn Diderichsen
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for Socialmedicin, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Københavns Universitet, DK-1014 København K. f.diderichsen@socmed.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Dec 17;169(51):4448-50
Date
Dec-17-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Savings
Health Policy - economics
Health Services - economics
Health status
Humans
National Health Programs - economics
Sweden
PubMed ID
18208685 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.