Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2413 records – page 1 of 242.

The 2002-2003 supervision program unveiled.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189996
Source
Infirm Que. 2002 May-Jun;9(5 Suppl):4
Publication Type
Article

2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128763
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Norm Campbell
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Canada
Diabetes Complications - complications
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Risk factors
Stroke - complications
Notes
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2001 Aug;22(15):1343-5211465967
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Oct;17(5):519-2320195154
Cites: Stroke. 2002 May;33(5):1315-2011988609
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):657-6112107423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
Cites: Arch Neurol. 1993 Aug;50(8):855-628352673
Cites: Fam Pract. 1997 Apr;14(2):160-769137956
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1410-915983291
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):437-4317487286
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Dec;23(14):1124-3018060097
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Feb 12;117(6):743-5318212285
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2008 May;7(5):391-918396107
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):483-418548145
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):485-9018548146
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):497-118548148
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;21(11):1210-518772857
Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):299-30219417860
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 Jun;30(12):1434-919454575
Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Jul;27(7):1472-719474763
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 Aug;25(8):451-219668778
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Nov 23;169(21):1996-200219933962
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2010 Mar;30(3):228-3520180606
Cites: Health Rep. 2010 Mar;21(1):37-4620426225
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Apr 29;362(17):1575-8520228401
Cites: Int J Stroke. 2010 Apr;5(2):110-620446945
Cites: Curr Opin Cardiol. 2010 Jul;25(4):366-7220502323
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 27;287(8):1003-1011866648
PubMed ID
22170191 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2015 National Cancer Program in Sweden: Introducing standardized care pathways in a decentralized system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284148
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jens Wilkens
Hans Thulesius
Ingrid Schmidt
Christina Carlsson
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Protocols - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Politics
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Starting in 2015, the Swedish government has initiated a national reform to standardize cancer patient pathways and thereby eventually speed up treatment of cancer. Cancer care in Sweden is characterized by high survival rates and a generally high quality albeit long waiting times. The objective with the new national program to standardize cancer care pathways is to reduce these waiting times, increase patient satisfaction with cancer care and reduce regional inequalities. A new time-point for measuring the start of a care process is introduced called well-founded suspicion, which is individually designed for each cancer diagnosis. While medical guidelines are well established earlier, the standardisation is achieved by defining time boundaries for each step in the process. The cancer reform program is a collaborative effort initiated and incentivized by the central government while multi-professional groups develop the time-bound standardized care pathways, which the regional authorities are responsible for implementing. The broad stakeholder engagement and time-bound guidelines are interesting approaches to study for other countries that need to streamline care processes.
PubMed ID
27823827 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal community alcohol harm reduction policy (ACAHRP) project: a vision for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159852
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Louis Gliksman
Margaret Rylett
Ronald R Douglas
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention & Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, London, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. louis_gliksman@camh.net
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Ownership
Population Groups
Abstract
Four First Nation communities in Ontario, Canada, formulated alcohol management policies between 1992 and 1994. An alcohol management policy is a local control option to manage alcohol use in recreation and leisure areas. Survey results indicate that decreases in alcohol use-related problems related to intoxication, nuisance behaviors, criminal activity, liquor license violations, and personal harm were perceived to have occurred. Furthermore, having policy regulations in place did not have an adverse effect on facility rentals. Band administrators and facility staff in each community felt the policy had had a positive effect on events at which alcohol was sold or served.
PubMed ID
18075913 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Feb;8(2):388-41021556193
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:327-4721219157
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2000 Aug;23(4):334-4010940958
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2001 May;11(3):291-211339074
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Apr;26(2):120-412054329
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2002 Oct;26(5):426-3112413286
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S101-1714668090
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Jan-Feb;95(1):45-914768741
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1997 Dec;21(7):789-919489201
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1998 Oct;22(6):648-529848957
Cites: Br Med J. 1950 Sep 30;2(4682):739-4814772469
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):329-3615415260
Cites: J Am Med Assoc. 1950 May 27;143(4):336-815415261
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 May 15;184(10):529-3016719758
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Aug;35(4):888-90116585055
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Apr;31(2):174-617461010
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2008;29:325-5018173388
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2008 Apr;32(2):110-618412679
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(11):2378-8918313186
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(11):1708-1618938006
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Apr;38(2):470-719047078
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2010 Feb;33(1):77-8420014004
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2010;6:2620831827
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011 Feb;35(1):47-5321299700
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:10222533609
PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion services in Canada: a patchwork quilt with many holes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195196
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):847-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001

Access and authorisation in a Glocal e-Health Policy context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180735
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2004
Author
Richard E Scott
Penny Jennett
Maryann Yeo
Author Affiliation
Global e-Health Research and Training Program, G204 Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4N1. rescott@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2004 Mar 31;73(3):259-66
Date
Mar-31-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Canada
Computer Security
Health Policy
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration - standards
Security Measures
World Health
Abstract
Challenges to the development of appropriate yet adaptable policy and tools for security of the individual patient electronic health record (EHR) are proving to be significant. Compounding this is the unique capability of e-health to transgress all existing geo-political and other barriers. Initiatives to develop and advance policy, standards, and tools in relation to EHR access control and authorisation management must address this capability. Currently policy development initiatives take place largely in an isolated manner. This jeopardises the potential of e-health because decisions made in one jurisdiction might hamper, even prevent, an e-health opportunity in another. This paper places access and authorisation issues in an overall policy context through describing current Canadian initiatives. The National Initiative for Telehealth (NIFTE) Guidelines project is developing a framework of national guidelines for telehealth. The Policy and Peer Permission (PPP) project is developing a unique tool that provides persistent protection of data. The new corporate body 'Infoway' is developing a pan-Canadian electronic health record solution. Finally, the Glocal e-Health Policy initiative is developing a tool with which to identify and describe the inter-relationships of e-health issues amongst policy levels, themes, and actors.
PubMed ID
15066556 View in PubMed
Less detail

2413 records – page 1 of 242.