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2011 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: an annual update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128763
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Norm Campbell
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Dec;57(12):1393-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Canada
Diabetes Complications - complications
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Life Style
Risk factors
Stroke - complications
Notes
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Cites: Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):128-3419114646
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):279-8619417858
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):299-30219417860
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Cites: J Hypertens. 2009 Jul;27(7):1472-719474763
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2009 Aug;25(8):451-219668778
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Nov 23;169(21):1996-200219933962
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2010 Mar;30(3):228-3520180606
Cites: Health Rep. 2010 Mar;21(1):37-4620426225
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Apr 29;362(17):1575-8520228401
Cites: Int J Stroke. 2010 Apr;5(2):110-620446945
Cites: Curr Opin Cardiol. 2010 Jul;25(4):366-7220502323
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Feb 27;287(8):1003-1011866648
PubMed ID
22170191 View in PubMed
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The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Cancer Program in Sweden: Introducing standardized care pathways in a decentralized system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284148
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jens Wilkens
Hans Thulesius
Ingrid Schmidt
Christina Carlsson
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Protocols - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Politics
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Starting in 2015, the Swedish government has initiated a national reform to standardize cancer patient pathways and thereby eventually speed up treatment of cancer. Cancer care in Sweden is characterized by high survival rates and a generally high quality albeit long waiting times. The objective with the new national program to standardize cancer care pathways is to reduce these waiting times, increase patient satisfaction with cancer care and reduce regional inequalities. A new time-point for measuring the start of a care process is introduced called well-founded suspicion, which is individually designed for each cancer diagnosis. While medical guidelines are well established earlier, the standardisation is achieved by defining time boundaries for each step in the process. The cancer reform program is a collaborative effort initiated and incentivized by the central government while multi-professional groups develop the time-bound standardized care pathways, which the regional authorities are responsible for implementing. The broad stakeholder engagement and time-bound guidelines are interesting approaches to study for other countries that need to streamline care processes.
PubMed ID
27823827 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2012
Author
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
HUNT forskningssenter, Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norway. steinak@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Date
Oct-16-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Preventive Medicine
Public Health
PubMed ID
23076491 View in PubMed
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Feb;8(2):388-41021556193
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:327-4721219157
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Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Dec;5 Suppl 1:S101-1714668090
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2004 Jan-Feb;95(1):45-914768741
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
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Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011 Feb;35(1):47-5321299700
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:10222533609
PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
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Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284320
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Geary J1, Jardine CG, Guebert J, Bubela T.
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 912-920 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):912-920
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Access to Information/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/legislation & jurisprudence
Biomedical Research/organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations/legislation & jurisprudence
Culture
Financing, Government
Genetics, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
Genetics, Medical/organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Indians, North American/ethnology
Indians, North American/genetics
Indians, North American/legislation & jurisprudence
Documents
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Access to fertility services for lesbian women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112457
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Shannon L Corbett
Helena M Frecker
Heather M Shapiro
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Fertility Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: scorbett@conceive.ca.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Canada
Female
Fertility
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Sex Factors
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
To determine reproductive services offered to lesbian patients by Canadian fertility clinics, policies of practice, ease of access to these services, and sensitivity of clinics to this population of patients.
Survey sent to assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinic directors.
Academic medical center, university-based ethics institute.
None.
The percentage of Canadian fertility clinics that will provide reproductive services to lesbian patients; services offered; the presence of clinic policies on lesbian care; and the presence on web sites of heteronormative material.
Completed surveys were received from 71% (24/34) of clinics. All clinics surveyed provided reproductive services to lesbian patients, with the exception of one clinic. Five of 24 (21%) clinics have a written policy on care for lesbian patients; 29% (7/24) will provide services to lesbian patients without prior investigations. All clinics will offer IUI and cycle monitoring to lesbian patients. Twenty-three of 24 clinics (96%) will offer IVF services when required. Fourteen of 32 clinic web sites (44%) make mention of lesbian patients and 27% (8/30) have heteronormative information only.
Lesbians encounter several barriers to accessing reproductive services in Canada. Addressing these issues could improve experiences of lesbian women and couples seeking care at fertility clinics.
PubMed ID
23830154 View in PubMed
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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
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775 records – page 1 of 78.