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Behind closed doors: in-home workers' experience of sexual harassment and workplace violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193862
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2001 Jul;6(3):255-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
J. Barling
A G Rogers
E K Kelloway
Author Affiliation
School of Business, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. jbarling@business.queensu.ca
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2001 Jul;6(3):255-69
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allied Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Fear
Female
Home Care Services - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Morale
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Policy
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sexual Harassment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The authors developed and tested a structural model predicting personal and organizational consequences of workplace violence and sexual harassment for health care professionals who work inside their client's home. The model suggests that workplace violence and sexual harassment predict fear of their recurrence in the workplace, which in turn predicts negative mood (anxiety and anger) and perceptions of injustice. In turn, fear, negative mood, and perceived injustice predict lower affective commitment and enhanced withdrawal intentions, poor interpersonal job performance, greater neglect, and cognitive difficulties. The results supported the model and showed that the associations of workplace violence and sexual harassment with organizational and personal outcomes are indirect, mediated by fear and negative mood. Conceptual implications for understanding sexual harassment and workplace violence, and future research directions, are suggested.
PubMed ID
11482636 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about low back pain in the Norwegian general population: are they related to pain experiences and health professionals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83344
Source
Spine. 2005 Aug 1;30(15):1770-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2005
Author
Werner Erik L
Ihlebaek Camilla
Skouen Jan Sture
Laerum Even
Author Affiliation
Department of Research and Development, The Hospital of Rehabilitation, Stavern, Norway. loewern@online.no
Source
Spine. 2005 Aug 1;30(15):1770-6
Date
Aug-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Culture
Female
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Pain Measurement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A baseline study of the general population and the health care providers in 3 Norwegian counties. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if beliefs about low back pain (LBP) are related to personal experiences and profession sought for care. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Myths about LBP that are abandoned by health professionals are still alive in the public. Such myths represent pain avoidance beliefs and passive coping strategies that may hinder normal spontaneous recovery from an episode of LBP. METHODS: A sample of 1502 randomly selected people was interviewed by telephone, and all the 1105 physicians, physiotherapists, and chiropractors in the area were sent a questionnaire in April 2002. All respondents gave their responses in terms of degree of agreement to 6 statements reflecting beliefs about LBP. RESULTS: Personal back pain experiences were important for beliefs about LBP. People with a history of previous back pain had more faith in the 2 statements "Back pain recovers best by itself" (52.2%) and "In most cases back pain recovers by itself in a couple of weeks" (32.5%) than those with current pain (36.9% and 20.9%, respectively, P
PubMed ID
16094280 View in PubMed
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Clients' and therapists' views of the therapeutic alliance: similarities, differences and relationship to therapy outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129670
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2013 Mar-Apr;20(2):118-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexandra Bachelor
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. alexandra.bachelor@arul.ulaval.ca
Source
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2013 Mar-Apr;20(2):118-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Helping Behavior
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy - methods
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To better understand how clients' and therapists' views of the therapeutic alliance differ and overlap, this study investigated, first, the components of the alliance that are relevant to the therapy participants; second, their relationship to post-therapy outcome; and third, the relationships between participants' alliance constructs. To identify participants' views, exploratory factor analyses were performed on clients' (n = 176) and therapists' (n = 133 observations) ratings of the Working Alliance Inventory (short form), the Helping Alliance Questionnaire and the California Psychotherapy Alliance Scales and conducted both on each measure separately and on the three measures combined. The results of the separate analyses indicated in general poor correspondence between the participant-derived components and each measure's a priori constructs. Results of the joint analyses suggested that clients view the alliance in terms of six basic components (Collaborative Work Relationship, Productive Work, Active Commitment, Bond, Non-disagreement on Goals/Tasks and Confident Progress), five of which were found to predict client-rated and/or therapist-rated post-therapy outcome. Results for therapists suggested four basic components (Collaborative Work Relationship, Therapist Confidence & Dedication, Client Commitment & Confidence, Client Working Ability), of which three predicted post-therapy outcome. Findings of significant, but modest to low moderate, correlations between several client and therapist joint factors suggested that despite similarities, the therapy partners' views of the alliance differ in important ways. Compared with therapists, clients appear to place greater emphasis on helpfulness, joint participation in the work of therapy and negative signs of the alliance. Implications of these findings are discussed.
Therapists should not assume that their views of the therapeutic relationship and therapeutic work are shared by their clients and are encouraged to seek the client's feedback. Therapists may benefit from conveying that the client's perspective on problems and relevant work is valued and that they are working with the client as a team. Therapists may need to explicitly address how the therapeutic work is helpful and conducive to desired changes.
PubMed ID
22081490 View in PubMed
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Constructing a questionnaire for assessment of awareness and acceptance of diversity in healthcare institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114558
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Azita Emami
Jalal Safipour
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Aging Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:145
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To develop a healthcare environment that is congruent with diversity among care providers and care recipients and to eliminate ethnic discrimination, it's important to map out and assess caregivers' awareness and acceptance of diversity. Because of a lack of standardized questionnaires in the Swedish context, this study designed and standardized a questionnaire: the Assessment of Awareness and Acceptance of Diversity in Healthcare Institutions (AAAD, for short).
The questionnaire was developed in four phases: a comprehensive literature review, face and content validity, construct validity by factor analysis, and a reliability test by internal consistency and stability assessments.
Results of different validity and reliability analyses suggest high face, content, and construct validity as well as good reliability in internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.68 to 0.8) and stability (test-retest: Spearman rank correlation coefficient: 0.60 to 0.76). The result of the factor analysis identified six dimensions in the questionnaire: 1) Attitude toward discrimination, 2) Interaction between staff, 3) Stereotypic attitude toward working with a person with a Swedish background, 4) Attitude toward working with a patient with a different background, 5) Attitude toward communication with persons with different backgrounds, 6) Attitude toward interaction between patients and staff.
This study introduces a newly developed questionnaire with good reliability and validity values that can assess healthcare workers' awareness and acceptance of diversity in the healthcare environment and healthcare delivery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23607334 View in PubMed
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Continuing education training focused on the development of behavioral telehealth competencies in behavioral healthcare providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118107
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:2108
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
V. Gifford
B. Niles
I. Rivkin
C. Koverola
J. Polaha
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA. vmgifford@alaska.edu
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2012;12:2108
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cultural Competency - ethics
Education, Continuing - methods
Educational Measurement
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Health - education - manpower
Professional Role
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Program Development
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Rural Health Services - ethics - manpower - standards
Self Report
Specialization
Staff Development
Telemedicine - ethics
Abstract
Telehealth allows behavioral health care and specialty services to be extended to rural residents. Telehealth is an important resource for the Alaskan healthcare system, which is tasked with providing services to culturally diverse populations living in remote areas. Training competent providers to deliver telehealth services is vital for the implementation of successful telehealth programs. Yet, the literature is lacking in the area of provider behavioral telehealth competency training.
This study assessed the impact of a Behavioral Telehealth Ethical Competencies Training program on 16 behavioral health providers' development of behavioral telehealth competency. A total of 14 competencies were developed, which required participants to understand the roles and responsibilities of a behavioral telehealth coordinator working at the distal site as well as the roles and responsibilities of the therapist. Video vignettes evaluating the 14 competencies, self-reported competence surveys and follow-up surveys of progress on telehealth goals were utilized to assess effects of the training.
Results indicated participants' behavioral telehealth competencies increased following training. Participants reported positive perceptions regarding their competency, and achieved progress on the majority of behavioral telehealth goals set during the training.
This study provides a baseline for developing a best practice model for behavioral telehealth service delivery by identifying specific provider competencies for administering effective behavioral telehealth services. A unique continuing education training model, led by content experts including university professors and Alaska Native Elders, incorporating behavioral telehealth, rural ethics, cultural competency and vicarious trauma training is described. Lastly, this study details the use of an innovative video vignette assessment instrument for evaluating the effectiveness of continuing education training.
PubMed ID
23240871 View in PubMed
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Conventional and complementary cancer treatments: where do conventional and complementary providers seek information about these modalities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297461
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Nov 14; 18(1):854
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-14-2018
Author
Trine Stub
Sara A Quandt
Thomas A Arcury
Joanne C Sandberg
Agnete E Kristoffersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Sykehusveien 21, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. trine.stub@uit.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 Nov 14; 18(1):854
Date
Nov-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Male
Medical Informatics - statistics & numerical data
Medical Oncology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Norway
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Both conventional health care providers and complementary therapists treat cancer patients. To provide effective treatment, both types of providers should to be familiar with their own as well as alternative types of treatment. Our aim was to compare how conventional health care providers (oncology doctors, oncology nurses, family physicians) and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, reflexologists, massage therapists) seek information about conventional and complementary cancer treatments.
This analysis was conducted on the basis of feedback from 466 participants. We used self-administered questionnaires in a cross-sectional study.
The majority of the medical doctors (96%) searched for evidence-based information regarding conventional cancer treatments. They gathered this information mostly from guidelines, which is considered best practice and is expected from Norwegian health personnel. Eighty-one percent of the nurses gather this information from evidence based resources such as UpToDate. Colleagues were asked for information by 58% of the medical doctors and 64% of the nurses. Moreover, 50% of the medical doctors and 57% of the nurses searched for evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. The acupuncturists gathered evidence-based information for both conventional (79%) and complementary (77%) modalities, followed by the reflexologists (54 and 54%, respectively) and massage therapists (54 and 52%, respectively). Nearly half of the acupuncturist (49%) asked a colleague for information.
To provide safe cancer care, it is important that advice about complementary modalities is based on current and evidence-based evaluations. The majority of the medical doctors and nurses in this study sought information according to evidence-based medicine regarding conventional cancer treatments, and about half of them gathered evidence-based information about complementary cancer modalities. This was also true for the complementary therapists as they gathered information about complementary and conventional treatments from evidence-based evaluations. This demonstrates that since the term evidence-based medicine was first introduced in 1991, the approach has grown extensively and both conventional and complementary providers use this approach to seek information.
PubMed ID
30428878 View in PubMed
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Conversations about alcohol in healthcare - cross-sectional surveys in the Netherlands and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306694
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Mar 04; 20(1):283
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-04-2020
Author
Latifa Abidi
Per Nilsen
Nadine Karlsson
Janna Skagerström
Amy O'Donnell
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Limburg, Netherlands. Latifa.abidi@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Mar 04; 20(1):283
Date
Mar-04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluated and compared the extent, duration, contents, experiences and effects of alcohol conversations in healthcare in the Netherlands and Sweden in 2017.
Survey data in the Netherlands and Sweden were collected through an online web panel. Subjects were 2996 participants (response rate: 50.8%) in Sweden and 2173 (response rate: 82.2%) in the Netherlands. Data was collected on socio-demographics, alcohol consumption, healthcare visits in the past 12?months, number of alcohol conversations, and characteristics of alcohol conversations (duration, contents, experience, effects).
Results showed that Swedish respondents were more likely to have had alcohol conversations (OR?=?1.99; 95%CI?=?1.64-2.41; p?=?
PubMed ID
32131793 View in PubMed
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Cross-cultural validity of the demand-control questionnaire: Swedish and Brazilian workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264059
Source
Rev Saude Publica. 2014 Jun;48(3):486-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Yara Hahr Marques Hökerberg
Michael Eduardo Reichenheim
Eduardo Faerstein
Sonia Regina Lambert Passos
Johan Fritzell
Susanna Toivanen
Hugo Westerlund
Source
Rev Saude Publica. 2014 Jun;48(3):486-96
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brazil
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Sweden
Translations
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the cross-cultural validity of the Demand-Control Questionnaire, comparing the original Swedish questionnaire with the Brazilian version. METHODS We compared data from 362 Swedish and 399 Brazilian health workers. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were performed to test structural validity, using the robust weighted least squares mean and variance-adjusted (WLSMV) estimator. Construct validity, using hypotheses testing, was evaluated through the inspection of the mean score distribution of the scale dimensions according to sociodemographic and social support at work variables. RESULTS The confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses supported the instrument in three dimensions (for Swedish and Brazilians): psychological demands, skill discretion and decision authority. The best-fit model was achieved by including an error correlation between work fast and work intensely (psychological demands) and removing the item repetitive work (skill discretion). Hypotheses testing showed that workers with university degree had higher scores on skill discretion and decision authority and those with high levels of Social Support at Work had lower scores on psychological demands and higher scores on decision authority. CONCLUSIONS The results supported the equivalent dimensional structures across the two culturally different work contexts. Skill discretion and decision authority formed two distinct dimensions and the item repetitive work should be removed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25119944 View in PubMed
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Do psychosocial working conditions modify the effect of depressive symptoms on long-term sickness absence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107834
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2013 Nov;56(11):1329-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Pernille U Hjarsbech
Karl Bang Christensen
Rikke Voss Andersen
Vilhelm Borg
Birgit Aust
Reiner Rugulies
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2013 Nov;56(11):1329-40
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Depression - psychology
Female
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Home Health Aides - psychology
Homes for the Aged - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Middle Aged
Multilevel Analysis
Nurses - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workload - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate whether work unit-levels of psychosocial working conditions modify the effect of depressive symptoms on risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA).
A total of 5,416 Danish female eldercare workers from 309 work units were surveyed using questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and psychosocial working conditions. LTSA was derived from a national register. We aggregated scores of psychosocial working conditions to the work unit-level and conducted multi-level Poisson regression analyses.
Depressive symptoms, but not psychosocial working conditions, predicted LTSA. Psychosocial working conditions did not statistically significantly modify the effect of depressive symptoms on LTSA.
Psychosocial working conditions did not modify the effect of depressive symptoms on LTSA. The results, however, need to be interpreted with caution, as we cannot rule out lack of exposure contrast and non-differential misclassification of the exposure.
PubMed ID
23970474 View in PubMed
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Ethics rounds: An appreciated form of ethics support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280731
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2016 Mar;23(2):203-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Marit Silén
Mia Ramklint
Mats G Hansson
Kristina Haglund
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2016 Mar;23(2):203-13
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude of Health Personnel
Ethics Consultation
Ethics, Medical
Female
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Ethics rounds are one way to support healthcare personnel in handling ethically difficult situations. A previous study in the present project showed that ethics rounds did not result in significant changes in perceptions of how ethical issues were handled, that is, in the ethical climate. However, there was anecdotal evidence that the ethics rounds were viewed as a positive experience and that they stimulated ethical reflection.
The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how the ethics rounds were experienced and why the intervention in the form of ethics rounds did not succeed in improving the ethical climate for the staff.
An exploratory and descriptive design with a qualitative approach was adopted, using individual interviews.
A total of 11 healthcare personnel, working in two different psychiatry outpatient clinics and with experience of participating in ethics rounds, were interviewed.
The study was based on informed consent and was approved by one of the Swedish Regional Ethical Review Boards.
The participants were generally positive about the ethics rounds. They had experienced changes by participating in the ethics rounds in the form of being able to see things from different perspectives as well as by gaining insight into ethical issues. However, these changes had not affected daily work.
A crucial question is whether or not increased reflection ability among the participants is a good enough outcome of ethics rounds and whether this result could have been measured in patient-related outcomes. Ethics rounds might foster cooperation among the staff and this, in turn, could influence patient care.
By listening to others during ethics rounds, a person can learn to see things from a new angle. Participation in ethics rounds can also lead to better insight concerning ethical issues.
PubMed ID
25527354 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.