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294 records – page 1 of 30.

A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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Ability to solve problems, professionalism, management, empathy, and working capacity in occupational therapy--the professional self description form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73247
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M T Gullberg
H M Olsson
G. Alenfelt
A B Ivarsson
M. Nilsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
The majority of occupational therapists in Sweden previously worked on large occupational therapy wards. Health care policy has changed over the years and the system has been reorganized accordingly. The employment situation for occupational therapists has also changed. This paper focuses on the perception of professional self among occupational therapists. The objective was to explore the professional self and to suggest components important to the occupational therapist profession. The Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) was used for the exploration of self. The 19 items in the PSDF cover areas relevant to professional functioning and activity. Sixty-eight employed occupational therapists participated. The results of the PSDF were subjected to factor analysis and five factors were obtained; Ability to solve problems, Professionalism, Management, Empathy, and Working capacity. We believe that these five factors can function as improving domains of the role of the professional occupational therapist in Sweden.
PubMed ID
7724926 View in PubMed
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Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
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[A complex psychological assessment of health care quality of medical personnel and quality of life of four generation of Ukrainians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90408
Source
Lik Sprava. 2008 Apr-Jun;(3-4):123-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rozenbaum M D
Grechenkova L N
Kostenko L S
Grechenkov S V
Source
Lik Sprava. 2008 Apr-Jun;(3-4):123-35
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Clinical Competence
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Moscow
Psychological Tests
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quality of Life - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Ukraine
Young Adult
Abstract
The article presents experience of the assessment of labour quality and professionalism of medical personnel (physicians and nurses) after the study conducted in 20 medical institutions in Kiev and 20 in Moscow. Expert-points method of assessment was used, correlation analysis of finalized qualifying assessment and social status of staff in each department was the mechanism of check of obtained results. Quality of life of population depends a lot on professionalism of specialists (physicians, teachers, scientists and others). The article presents results of four year (2003-2006) study of quality of life of four generations of Ukrainians aged from 11 to 85 years. Regularity was revealed in different sides of life of four group of responders, including personal, behavioral and psychological aspects.
PubMed ID
19145833 View in PubMed
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Adherence to hand hygiene and risk factors for poor adherence in 13 Ontario acute care hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133791
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2011 Oct;39(8):693-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Dominik Mertz
Jennie Johnstone
Paul Krueger
Kevin Brazil
Stephen D Walter
Mark Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Infect Control. 2011 Oct;39(8):693-6
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohols - administration & dosage
Female
Guideline Adherence
Hand Disinfection - methods - standards
Health Personnel - psychology
Hospitals
Humans
Hygiene
Male
Observation - methods
Ontario
Risk factors
Abstract
Multicenter studies assessing hand hygiene adherence and risk factors for poor performance are scarce. In an observational study involving 13 hospitals across Ontario, Canada, we found a mean adherence rate of 31.2%, and that adherence was positively associated with nurses, single rooms, contact precautions, and the availability of alcohol hand rub dispensers.
PubMed ID
21664722 View in PubMed
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[American physicians "burnout" and Swedish physicians "exhaustion". Stress-related mental illness is increasing also among Swedish medical staff].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273236
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015

An exploratory study of factors influencing resuscitation skills retention and performance among health providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123106
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):126-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vernon Curran
Lisa Fleet
Melanie Greene
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):126-33
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Life Support Care - psychology
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Regional Health Planning
Resuscitation - education
Retention (Psychology)
Rural Health Services - manpower
Urban Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Resuscitation and life support skills training comprises a significant proportion of continuing education programming for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of certified resuscitation providers toward the retention of resuscitation skills, regular skills updating, and methods for enhancing retention.
A mixed-methods, explanatory study design was undertaken utilizing focus groups and an online survey-questionnaire of rural and urban health care providers.
Rural providers reported less experience with real codes and lower abilities across a variety of resuscitation areas. Mock codes, practice with an instructor and a team, self-practice with a mannequin, and e-learning were popular methods for skills updating. Aspects of team performance that were felt to influence resuscitation performance included: discrepancies in skill levels, lack of communication, and team leaders not up to date on their skills. Confidence in resuscitation abilities was greatest after one had recently practiced or participated in an update or an effective debriefing session. Lowest confidence was reported when team members did not work well together, there was no clear leader of the resuscitation code, or if team members did not communicate.
The study findings highlight the importance of access to update methods for improving providers' confidence and abilities, and the need for emphasis on teamwork training in resuscitation. An eclectic approach combining methods may be the best strategy for addressing the needs of health professionals across various clinical departments and geographic locales.
PubMed ID
22733640 View in PubMed
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Are clear boundaries a prerequisite for well-functioning collaboration in home health care? A mixed methods study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295080
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):128-137
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Ulla Beijer
Emme-Li Vingare
Hans G Eriksson
Õie Umb Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2018 Mar; 32(1):128-137
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Role - psychology
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether professional collaboration in home health care is associated with clear boundaries between principals' areas of responsibility and the professions areas of responsibility, respectively.
Data were derived from a web-based survey that was carried out in one county in the middle of Sweden during spring 2013. Participants were health professionals and managers from the county council and from all the municipalities in the county. Both structured and open-ended questions were utilised. A total of 421 individuals (90% women) answered the structured questions, and 91 individuals (22% of the 421) answered the open-ended questions. Quantitative data were analysed with descriptive statistics methods, tests of independence and of correlation strength. Qualitative data were analysed with content analysis.
The results from the structured questions showed that well-functioning collaboration was associated with clear boundaries between principals in the county overall, and for respondents in two of three parts of the county. Association between clear boundaries between professions and well-functioning collaboration was found in the county overall among the municipality population. However, in one part of the county, we did not find any correlations between well-functioning collaboration and clear boundaries between professions or principals, with the exception of home help services. The analysis of the open questions gave similar results as the quantitative analysis, illustrated within three themes: The significance of concepts, trust and interdependence, and collaboration as a means for well-being.
The results indicate that, recently after an organisational change, clear boundaries between the principals' areas of responsibility and professions' area of responsibility respectively are necessary for effective cooperation between professionals. If the organisation and professionals have previous positive experience of colocated activities, clear boundaries do not share the same importance.
PubMed ID
28524383 View in PubMed
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Are patient rights to information and self-determination in diagnostic genetic testing upheld? A comparison of patients' and providers' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154456
Source
J Genet Couns. 2009 Feb;18(1):72-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Tarja Nyrhinen
Marja Hietala
Pauli Puukka
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
TUCH LAB, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Turku University Hospital, PL 52, 20521, Turku, Finland. tarja.nyrhinen@utu.fi
Source
J Genet Couns. 2009 Feb;18(1):72-81
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Freedom
Genetic Testing - psychology
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Rights
Patients - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study assessed how the patient's right to receive information and the right to self-determination were followed during diagnostic testing, according to the perceptions of patients and parents of tested children (group 1, n = 106) and healthcare personnel (group 2, n = 162). Data were collected in three Finnish university hospitals using a questionnaire. Results revealed one between group difference: patients/parents agreed more strongly than did personnel that self-determination was followed before testing. Within groups included: patients/parents had stronger agreement that self-determination was followed before testing than after testing; personnel had stronger agreement about information received after testing than before testing, and they had weaker agreement about how well self-determination was followed before testing than after testing. Received information was experienced as similar both before and after testing and by patients/parents and by personnel. Providing adequate time to consider whether or not to be tested and giving more support to patients after testing would promote the rights of patients. Furthermore, assessment of personnel characteristics is needed to determine, for example, the kinds of value conflicts that exist between personnel's own values and patients' values.
PubMed ID
18979191 View in PubMed
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294 records – page 1 of 30.