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Academic administrators' attitudes towards interprofessional education in Canadian schools of health professional education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173370
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Vernon R Curran
Diana R Deacon
Lisa Fleet
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care
Questionnaires
Schools, Health Occupations
Abstract
Interprofessional education is an approach to educating and training students and practitioners from different health professions to work in a collaborative manner in providing client and/or patient-centred care. The introduction and successful implementation of this educational approach is dependent on a variety of factors, including the attitudes of students, faculty, senior academic administrators (e.g., deans and directors) and practitioners. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education amongst academic administrators of post-secondary health professional education programs in Canada. A web-based questionnaire in English and French was distributed via e-mail messaging during January 2004 to academic administrators in Canada representing medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, occupational therapy and physiotherapy post-secondary educational programs. Responses were sought on attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education, as well as opinions regarding barriers to interprofessional education and subject areas that lend themselves to interprofessional education. In general, academic administrators responding to the survey hold overall positive attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education practices, and the results indicate there were no significant differences between professions in relation to these attitudinal perspectives. The main barriers to interprofessional education were problems with scheduling/calendar, rigid curriculum, turf battles and lack of perceived value. The main pre-clinical subject areas which respondents believed would lend themselves to interprofessional education included community health/prevention, ethics, communications, critical appraisal, and epidemiology. The results of this study suggest that a favourable perception of both interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education exists amongst academic administrators of Canadian health professional education programs. If this is the case, the post-secondary system in Canada is primed for the introduction of interprofessional education initiatives which support the development of client and patient-centred collaborative practice competencies.
PubMed ID
16096147 View in PubMed
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Acceptance by Swedish users of a multimedia program for primary and secondary prevention of malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21301
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L H Lindholm
A. Isacsson
B. Slaug
T R Möller
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Dalby/Lund, Lund University, Helgeandsgatan, Sweden.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Occupations - education
Heliotherapy - adverse effects
Humans
Language
Male
Melanoma - prevention & control
Multimedia
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Sweden, the incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin is rapidly increasing, and the disease is now one of the ten most common tumor types. The objectives were to apply multimedia techniques to increase public knowledge about malignant melanoma and its risk factors, to increase awareness of preventive measures, and to make people more disposed to change their sunbathing habits. METHODS: A trilingual (Swedish, English, and German) multimedia program was developed for two target groups, health care personnel and the general public, with a total of >500 "pages" in each language. User reactions were studied on-site at a municipal pharmacy and library, where the program was available in a kiosk with touch-screen. RESULTS: Practically all 274 users interviewed found the program easy to use and understand. 92% identified one or more of the recommendations given. 66% found the program information "worrying," and 29%--mainly young women-instantly declared that they were going to change their sun-exposure behaviors. No correlation to skin type was found. CONCLUSIONS: A multimedia program of the present design seems to be a useful tool for health promotion.
PubMed ID
9883779 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and reliability of the Readiness for Inter professional Learning Scale in a Danish student and health professional setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278118
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2016
Author
Birgitte Nørgaard
Eva Draborg
Jan Sørensen
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2016 Feb 16;16:60
Date
Feb-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
Educational Measurement - methods
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Occupations - education - standards
Humans
Interdisciplinary Studies - standards - trends
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translations
Young Adult
Abstract
Shared learning activities aim to enhance the collaborative skills of health students and professionals in relation to both colleagues and patients. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale is used to assess such skills. The aim of this study was to validate a Danish four-subscale version of the RIPLS in a sample of 370 health-care students and 200 health professionals.
The questionnaire was translated following a two-step process, including forward and backward translations, and a pilot test. A test of internal consistency and a test-retest of reliability were performed using a web-based questionnaire.
The questionnaire was completed by 370 health care students and 200 health professionals (test) whereas the retest was completed by 203 health professionals. A full data set of first-time responses was generated from the 570 students and professionals at baseline (test). Good internal association was found between items in Positive Professional Identity (Q13-Q16), with factor loadings between 0.61 and 0.72. The confirmatory factor analyses revealed 11 items with factor loadings above 0.50, 18 below 0.50, and no items below 0.20. Weighted kappa values were between 0.20 and 0.40, 16 items with values between 0.40 and 0.60, and six items between 0.60 and 0.80; all showing p-values below 0.001.
Strong internal consistency was found for both populations. The Danish RIPLS proved a stable and reliable instrument for the Teamwork and Collaboration, Negative Professional Identity, and Positive Professional Identity subscales, while the Roles and Responsibility subscale showed some limitations. The reason behind these limitations is unclear.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26879933 View in PubMed
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Admission and optometry grade comparisons among students receiving different types of admission interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219228
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1994 Jan;71(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
M M Spafford
Author Affiliation
School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 1994 Jan;71(1):47-52
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Educational Measurement
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Optometry - education
Retrospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
This retrospective study examined the interview scores, admission grades, and optometry grades of students who received one of two types of admission interviews. The INDIV-BLIND group (N = 36) represented those students who had received an individual interview (i.e., one interviewer) for which the interviewer had no access to the candidate's file. The PANEL-ACCESS group (N = 21) was made up of those students who had received a panel interview (i.e., two interviewers) for which the interviewers had access to the candidate's file. The two groups were compared using two admission grades and seven optometry grades. Both t-test and Wilcoxon Score statistical procedures were used to test the null hypothesis (H0) that there were no significant grade differences (p
PubMed ID
8145998 View in PubMed
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Alaska native community health aide training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110033
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Jun;11(2):62-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1969
Author
D C Shook
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Jun;11(2):62-3
Date
Jun-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Health Services - education
Health Occupations - education
Humans
PubMed ID
5797253 View in PubMed
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[An experiment in interdisciplinary education].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240256
Source
Infirm Can. 1984 Aug;26(7):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984

An exploratory analysis of an interprofessional learning environment in two hospital clinical teaching units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169948
Source
J Interprof Care. 2006 Jan;20(1):29-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Lynn Russell
Joyce Nyhof-Young
Beverley Abosh
S. Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. l.russell@utoronto.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2006 Jan;20(1):29-39
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Occupations - education
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Nursing - methods
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Models, Educational
Ontario
Patient care team
Pilot Projects
Abstract
An analysis of a teaching environment with regard to interprofessional practice was done using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Medical, nursing and other health professional staff and students from two hospital units (medical and surgical) completed two surveys. The students were also interviewed. Staff differed in survey results among disciplines, with nurses and other health professionals having a more positive view of interprofessional collaboration than physicians. Student interviews supported our hypothesis that little formal or informal interprofessional education occurred during clinical rotations. Students had little understanding of the nature of collaborative behavior, and appeared to learn their discipline's attitudes and practices through tacit observation of staff behaviors. This appears to reinforce disciplinary stereotypes, and may be a significant barrier to the development of collaborative practice. These results have implications for the design of interprofessional curriculum in clinical practicums.
PubMed ID
16581637 View in PubMed
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An inter-institutional collaboration: transforming education through interprofessional simulations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113843
Source
J Interprof Care. 2013 Sep;27(5):429-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sharla King
Jane Drummond
Ellen Hughes
Sharon Bookhalter
Dan Huffman
Dawn Ansell
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Health Sciences Council, Alberta, Canada. sharla.king@ualberta.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2013 Sep;27(5):429-31
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Simulation
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
Universities
Abstract
An inter-institutional partnership of four post-secondary institutions and a health provider formed a learning community with the goal of developing, implementing and evaluating interprofessional learning experiences in simulation-based environments. The organization, education and educational research activities of the learning community align with the institutional and instructional reforms recommended by the Lancet Commission on Health Professional Education for the 21st century. This article provides an overview of the inter-institutional collaboration, including the interprofessional simulation learning experiences, instructor development activities and preliminary results from the evaluation.
PubMed ID
23679670 View in PubMed
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The career paths of MHSc graduates in health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216459
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Jan-Feb;86(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
K R Allison
D. McNally
D. DePape
M. Kelner
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education, University of Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Jan-Feb;86(1):10-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Health Occupations - education - statistics & numerical data
Health Promotion - manpower
Humans
Job Description
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
There is much support for health promotion in Canada, but not much is known about the various academic programs in this field or of their impact on the practice of community health. A census survey was conducted in 1991 to determine the career paths of graduates of the MHSc program in Health Promotion at the University of Toronto. Findings from the study indicate that the career paths of graduates change following completion of their degree. They are more likely to work in health organizations other than hospital or treatment settings, to have more responsibility and authority in their positions as reflected by changes in job titles and to utilize a wider range of health promotion strategies and methods in their work following graduation. The findings indicate that graduate training in health promotion has a positive effect on the planning, implementation and evaluation of community health programs.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 1995 Jan-Feb;86(1):7-97619127
PubMed ID
7728708 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.