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Determining Ontario's supply and requirements for ophthalmologists in 2000 and 2005: 1. Methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202170
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):74-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
D D Persaud
R. Cockerill
G. Pink
G. Trope
Author Affiliation
School of Health Services Administration, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):74-81
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data - trends
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Ophthalmology - manpower
Population Growth
Specialization
Abstract
We performed a study to determine the supply of and requirements for ophthalmologists in Ontario in 2000 and 2005. In this paper we describe our methods.
The future supply of ophthalmologists was estimated by means of iterative multiple regression analysis using the baseline number of ophthalmologists, the number of ophthalmology residents and the numbers of ophthalmologists entering and exiting the workforce between 1989 and 2004. Data were obtained from the Ontario Physician Human Resource Data Centre, Statistics Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Finance and residency program directors of Ontario universities. We calculated requirements using four models. The physician:population ratio method used an ophthalmologist:population ratio (1:29,650) proposed by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and Statistics Canada population projections for 2000 and 2005. The utilization-based, substitution and needs-based models used Ontario Health Insurance Plan data for 1995. The supply and requirements are expressed as full-time equivalents, defined as the average number of minutes worked by ophthalmologists in 1995. The 401 ophthalmologists practising in Ontario in 1995 accounted for 452 full-time equivalents.
Incorporating the results of several requirement models increases the reliability and acceptability of estimates of physician workforce requirements.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):59-6110321314
PubMed ID
10321317 View in PubMed
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Determining Ontario's supply and requirements for ophthalmologists in 2000 and 2005: 2. A comparison of projected supply and requirements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202169
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):82-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
D D Persaud
R. Cockerill
G. Pink
G. Trope
Author Affiliation
School of Health Services Administration, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):82-7
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Research
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data - trends
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Ophthalmology - manpower
Population Growth
Specialization
Abstract
To determine whether the projected supply of ophthalmologists in 2000 and 2005 in Ontario will be matched by the predicted requirements.
Described in the accompanying paper (page 74).
Multiple regression analysis predicted a supply of 485 +/- 15 full-time-equivalent (FTE) ophthalmologists in 2000 and 476 +/- 14 FTEs in 2005. Except for the needs-based method of determining requirements, which generated a figure of 524 +/- 16 to 533 +/- 16 FTEs, the requirement methods yielded estimates that were within the range of the projected supply for 2000 (physician:population ratio method 458, utilization-based method 500 +/- 15 and substitution method 470 +/- 14 to 490 +/- 15). For 2005, only the physician:population ratio method gave an FTE requirement estimate (489) that was in keeping with the projected supply. The other models gave FTE estimates that were higher than the projected supply (utilization-based model 559 +/- 17, substitution model 526 +/- 16 to 548 +/- 16, and needs-based model 585 +/- 18 to 596 +/- 18).
The reduction in the number of ophthalmology residents in Ontario that began in 1994 will not affect the short-term requirements for ophthalmologists but may result in fewer ophthalmologists than will be necessary to fulfil Ontario's requirements in 2005 and beyond. Possible solutions include doubling the number of residency positions beginning in 1999.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 1999 Apr;34(2):59-6110321314
PubMed ID
10321318 View in PubMed
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Number of health care workers lags behind population growth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197482
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):323
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2000
Author
L. Buske
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):323
Date
Aug-8-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Needs Assessment
Population Growth
PubMed ID
10951735 View in PubMed
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[The analysis of the state and the dynamics of the health manpower resources of the subjects of the Russian Federation in 1990 - 2004].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164325
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2007 Jan-Feb;(1):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V O Shchepin
I A Kupeeva
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2007 Jan-Feb;(1):3-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asia
Delivery of Health Care - manpower
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Moscow
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
The labor and manpower resources are among the major resources of public health system. The article presents the analysis of the provision of the population of the Russian Federation with the medical and paramedical personnel during the last fifteen years both on the national and regional level. The revealed territorial differences in resources provision and two- and three-fold abmodality of the indices of medical and paramedical personnel supply testify of the urgent need in the comprehensive systemic approach in resolving the problem of the availability of the high-quality medical care to the population.
PubMed ID
17402566 View in PubMed
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