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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health literacy, health protective measures, and health-related quality of life during the Covid-19 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304892
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Kirsti Riiser
Sølvi Helseth
Kristin Haraldstad
Astrid Torbjørnsen
Kåre Rønn Richardsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Disinfection
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Norway
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology
Quality of Life
SARS-CoV-2
Social Isolation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Television
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to describe adolescents' health information sources and knowledge, health literacy (HL), health protective measures, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic in Norway. Second, to investigate the association between HL and the knowledge and behavior relevant for preventing spread of the virus. Third, to explore variables associated with HRQoL in a pandemic environment.
This cross-sectional study includes survey data from 2,205 Norwegian adolescents 16-19 years of age. The participants reported on their health information sources, HL, handwashing knowledge and behavior, number of social interactions, and HRQoL. Associations between study variables and specified outcomes were explored using multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Television (TV) and family were indicated to be the main sources for pandemic-related health information. Handwashing, physical distancing, and limiting the number of social contacts were the most frequently reported measures. HL and handwashing knowledge and HL and handwashing behavior were significantly associated. For each unit increase on the HL scale, the participants were 5% more likely to socialize less with friends in comparison to normal. The mean HRQoL was very poor compared to European norms. Being quarantined or isolated and having confirmed or suspected Covid-19 were significantly negatively associated with HRQoL, but seeing less friends than normal was not associated. HL was significantly positively associated with HRQoL, albeit of minor clinical importance.
Adolescents follow the health authorities' guidelines and appear highly literate. However, high fidelity requires great sacrifice because the required measures seem to collide with certain aspects that are important for the adolescents' HRQoL.
PubMed ID
32857806 View in PubMed
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An app for supporting older people receiving home care - usage, aspects of health and health literacy: a quasi-experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304739
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2020 09 15; 20(1):226
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-15-2020
Author
Carina Göransson
Yvonne Wengström
Maria Hälleberg-Nyman
Ann Langius-Eklöf
Kristina Ziegert
Karin Blomberg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, 701 82, Örebro, Sweden. carina.goransson@hh.se.
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2020 09 15; 20(1):226
Date
09-15-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Health Literacy
Home Care Services
Humans
Mobile Applications
Smartphone
Sweden
Abstract
During the last decade, there has been an increase in studies describing use of mHealth, using smartphones with apps, in the healthcare system by a variety of populations. Despite this, few interventions including apps are targeting older people receiving home care. Developing mobile technology to its full potential of being interactive in real time remains a challenge. The current study is part of a larger project for identifying and managing health concerns via an app by using real-time data. The aim of the study was to describe older people's usage of an app and to evaluate the impact of usage on aspects of health and health literacy over time.
A quasi-experimental design was employed. Seventeen older people self-reported health concerns via Interaktor twice a week for 3-months and answered questionnaires at baseline, the end of the intervention and at a 6-month follow-up. Logged data on app usage and data on Sense of Coherence, Health Index, Nutrition Form for the Elderly, Geriatric Depression Scale-20, Swedish Communicative and Critical Health Literacy and Swedish Functional Health Literacy were collected and analysed using descriptive and non-parametric inferential statistics.
The median usage of the app as intended was 96%. Pain was one of the most reported health concerns and was also the health concern that triggered an alert (n?=?33). The older people's communicative and critical health literacy improved significantly over time. Regarding the scores of Sense of Coherence, Health Index, Nutritional Form for the Elderly, Geriatric Depression Scale-20 and Swedish Functional Health Literacy scale, there were no significant differences over time.
The high app usage showed that an app may be a suitable tool for some older people living alone and receiving home care. The results indicate that the usage of Interaktor can support older people by significantly improving their communicative and critical health literacy. Aspects of health were not shown to be affected by the usage of the app. Further research with larger sample is needed for evaluation the effect on health literacy, and which aspects of health of importance to support by an app.
PubMed ID
32933500 View in PubMed
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An Approach to Improve Dementia Health Literacy in Indigenous Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307620
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2020 Mar; 35(1):69-83
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Sharlene Webkamigad
Wayne Warry
Melissa Blind
Kristen Jacklin
Author Affiliation
School of Rural and Northern Health, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada.
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2020 Mar; 35(1):69-83
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Cultural Competency
Dementia - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - methods
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Indigenous peoples
Language
Abstract
This project aims to improve health literacy in Indigenous communities through the development of evidence-based culturally relevant health promotion materials on dementia that bridge the gap between Indigenous and Western perspectives of the illness. The research team worked in partnership with Health Canada's First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program (FNIHCC) and consulted with Indigenous elders to utilize a two-eyed seeing framework that draws upon Indigenous knowledge and Western biomedicine. A consolidated review of materials and research involving Indigenous perspectives of Alzheimer's and age-related dementias led to the development of two culturally appropriate fact sheets. Two Indigenous-specific fact sheets were developed "What is Dementia? Indigenous Perspectives and Cultural Understandings" and "Signs and Symptoms of Dementia: An Indigenous Guide." The fact sheets prioritize Indigenous knowledge and pay particular attention to Indigenous languages, diverse Indigenous cultures, and literacy levels. The content uses phrasing and words from Indigenous people involved in the research to share information. Biomedical concepts and words were included when necessary but language or presentation of these aspects were often modified to reflect Indigenous conceptualizations. This project provides a foundation for evidence-based knowledge translation in relation to cultural safety in dementia care. Specifically, the researchers outline how health care providers can develop culturally appropriate health promotion material, thus increasing Indigenous cultural understandings of dementia and health literacy.
PubMed ID
31853783 View in PubMed
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An international comparison of the association among literacy, education, and health across the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Italy, Norway, and Bermuda: implications for health disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264798
Source
J Health Commun. 2015 Apr;20(4):406-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Takashi Yamashita
Suzanne R Kunkel
Source
J Health Commun. 2015 Apr;20(4):406-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bermuda
Canada
Educational Status
Female
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Internationality
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Switzerland
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between education and health is well-established, but theoretical pathways are not fully understood. Economic resources, stress, and health behaviors partially explain how education influences health, but further study is needed. Previous studies show that health literacy mediates the education-health relationship, as do general literacy skills. However, little is known whether such mediation effects are consistent across different societies. This study analyzed data from the International Assessment of Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey conducted in Canada, the United States, Italy, Norway, Switzerland, and Bermuda to investigate the mediation effects of literacy on the education-health relationship and the degree of such mediation in different cultural contexts. Results showed that literacy skills mediated the effect of education on health in all study locations, but the degree of mediation varied. This mediation effect was particularly strong in Bermuda. This study also found that different types of literacy skills are more or less important in each study location. For example, numeracy skills in the United States and prose (reading) literacy skills in Italy were stronger predictors of health than were other literacy skills. These findings suggest a new direction for addressing health disparities: focusing on relevant types of literacy skills.
PubMed ID
25749096 View in PubMed
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Assessing adolescents' perceived proficiency in critically evaluating nutrition information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296858
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 28; 15(1):61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-28-2018
Author
Desire Alice Naigaga
Kjell Sverre Pettersen
Sigrun Henjum
Øystein Guttersrud
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Kunnskapsveien 55, 2007, KC228, Kjeller, Norway. dnaiga@oslomet.no.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 28; 15(1):61
Date
06-28-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Communication
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutritive Value
Perception
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Over the recent past, there has been an increase in nutrition information available to adolescents from various sources, which resulted into confusion and misinterpretation of the dietary advice. Results from international assessment frameworks such as PISA and TIMMS reflect the need for adolescents to critically appraise health information. While a number of scales measuring the critical health literacy of individuals exist; very few of these are devoted to critical nutrition literacy. More so, these scales target individuals with an advanced level of nutrition education, often gaging their proficiency in information appraisal in relation to principles of evidence-based medical research. The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of a newly developed critical nutrition literacy scale (CNL-E) measuring adolescents' perceived proficiency in 'critically evaluating nutrition information from various sources'.
During spring 2015, more than 1600 tenth graders aged 15-16 years from approximately 60 schools in Norway responded to the five-item questionnaire using an electronic survey system. Applying Rasch analysis approach, we examined the psychometric properties of the CNL-E scale employing the RUMM2030 statistical package. To further investigate the dimensionality of the scale and test the underlying structure, we applied multidimensional Rasch modelling using the ConQuest 4 software and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the Lisrel 9.30 software.
In our sample, the CNL-E stood out as a valid, reliable and well-targeted scale with good overall fit to the partial credit parameterization of the polytomous unidimensional Rasch model (PCM). All the items were sufficiently statistically independent, had ordered response categories and showed acceptable individual fit to the PCM. No item displayed within-item bias or differential item functioning (DIF).
From the observed CNL-E sum score, it is possible to draw plausible conclusions about how individuals critically evaluate nutrition information. Efforts to improve communication of nutrition information could benefit from applying validated measures such as the CNL-E scale. The CNL-E scale provides insight into how individuals without an advanced level of nutrition education, such as adolescents, determine the validity and reliability of nutrition information from various sources.
PubMed ID
29954397 View in PubMed
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Assessment of health literacy among older Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299832
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Johanna Eronen
Leena Paakkari
Erja Portegijs
Milla Saajanaho
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaskyla, Finland. johanna.eronen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Focus Groups
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the feasibility of the HLS-EU-Q16 (in Finnish) for use among older Finns and whether the health literacy score correlates with indicators of health and functioning.
To determine the feasibility of the instrument, we first conducted a focus group discussion with nine participants. For the quantitative analyses, we used data from the AGNES cohort study, collected between October 2017 and April 2018 at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. 292 75-year-old Finnish men and women were interviewed face-to-face in their homes. Health literacy was measured with the HLS-EU-Q16 and health literacy score, ranging from 0 to 50, computed. The reproducibility of the instrument was test-retested. Chi-square tests were used to compare health literacy scores between participants by different socioeconomic variables, and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to study the associations of health literacy with cognition, depressive symptoms, chronic conditions, life-space mobility and physical performance.
The mean health literacy score for all participants was 35.05 (SD 6.32). Participants who rated their financial situation and self-rated health as very good had the highest health literacy scores (38.85, SD 5.09 and 39.22, SD 6.77, respectively). Better health literacy was associated with better cognitive status, fewer depressive symptoms and chronic conditions, higher life-space mobility and better physical performance.
The HLS-EU-Q16 is a feasible measure for research purposes among older Finns. The associations between health literacy and indicators of health and functioning need to be more closely investigated in larger samples with a wider age-range.
PubMed ID
30578457 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about causes of colon cancer by English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132620
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Jennifer Elizabeth McWhirter
Laura E Todd
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Communication Barriers
Culture
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Language
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Risk factors
Abstract
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Canadians. Immigrants underutilize screening and may be at greater risk of late stage diagnosis and death from the disease. This mixed-methods study investigated the self-reported causes of colon cancer by 66 English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada after reading a fact sheet which listed two causes of colon cancer (polyps and cause unknown) and six ways to help prevent colon cancer (lifestyle, diet, weight, smoking, alcohol, and screening). Women correctly named or described both causes (6.1%) or one cause (22.7%), could not name or describe either cause (19.7%), or named or described causes not included on the fact sheet (54.5%). The most common causes reported by participants were "risk factors": diet (53.0%), family history (28.8%), and lifestyle (22.7%). Women confused cause with risk factor and infrequently mentioned screening. Possible reasons for their reported beliefs are discussed.
PubMed ID
21800045 View in PubMed
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"Bringing what's on the inside out": arts-based cancer education with Alaska Native Peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301038
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 9(1) 2011: p.1-22.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
-based research; adult education; cancer education; Alaska Native; indigenous research; health communication; health literacy Learning invites us to think, feel, or be in new ways, which often requires moving beyond cognitive ways of knowing to discover, explore, and in- ternalize messages through
  1 document  
Author
Cueva, Melany
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health System
Source
Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health 9(1) 2011: p.1-22.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
229839
Keywords
Expressive arts
Alaska Native
Arts-based research
Adult education
Cancer
Indigenous research
Health Communication
Health Literacy
Abstract
Alaska Native peoples have a strong tradition of learning and passing knowledge through stories, drummings, songs, and dances. This study explored the use of expressive arts as a culturally respectful pathway for cancer education. The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting were woven into seven cancer education workshops during September and October 2009, in which 98 (85%) participants completed a written evaluation. The majority (91%) of workshop participants were female. By ethnicity, 46% were Alaska Native, 13% American Indian, 33% Caucasian, and 2% Hispanic. As described by participants on written post-cancer-education evaluations, the use of expressive arts awakened possibilities, inspired creativity, and expanded perspectives; brought learners together; helped participants talk about cancer; supported holistic ways of knowing and remembering; empowered wellness ways and self-care; and energized learning with fun, laughter, and play. Examples of ways the expressive arts were integrated into cancer education curriculum and participant comments are shared in this article. The expressive arts nurtured heart, head, and body ways of knowing to provide culturally relevant, learner-centred cancer education which served as a catalyst for cancer conversations and deeper understandings.
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A Canadian exploratory study to define a measure of health literacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135897
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Deborah Leslie Begoray
Brenda Kwan
Author Affiliation
Curriculum & Instruction, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, Canada. dbegoray@uvic.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):23-32
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Comprehension
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - standards
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Abstract
This study undertook a qualitative exploration of an operational definition of health literacy and an examination of quantitative measures of health literacy skills. We interviewed 229 older Canadian adults. First we engaged them in open-ended discussions about their search for information on a self-selected health topic. Next we administered nine self-report items on health literacy skills, and then task-performance items. Task-performance questions were based on two published reading passages on five levels of difficulty to measure 'understanding' of health-related material. The Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) was also administered as the comparison for criterion-related validity. Our open-ended questions elicited responses about the processes that people undergo when they attempt to access, understand, appraise and communicate health information. Qualitative findings revealed complexities in participants' interpretation of the meaning of all four health literacy skills. These descriptive findings add new knowledge about health literacy as a construct. Participants agreed with most of the self-report statements, thus indicating high belief in their own health literacy. REALM scores ranged from 45 to 66 with an average of 65 and standard deviation of 2.5. Quantitative scores on the reading passages were modestly correlated with scores on the REALM. The sum scale of self-report items, however, did not correlate with task-performance items, suggesting that the different types of items may not be measuring the same construct. We suggest that self-report items need more development and validation. Our study makes a contribution in exploring the complexities of measuring health literacy skills for general health contexts.
PubMed ID
21436143 View in PubMed
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123 records – page 1 of 13.