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Active aging - resilience and external support as modifiers of the disablement outcome: AGNES cohort study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299192
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-02-2018
Author
Taina Rantanen
Milla Saajanaho
Laura Karavirta
Sini Siltanen
Merja Rantakokko
Anne Viljanen
Timo Rantalainen
Katja Pynnönen
Anu Karvonen
Inna Lisko
Lotta Palmberg
Johanna Eronen
Eeva-Maija Palonen
Timo Hinrichs
Markku Kauppinen
Katja Kokko
Erja Portegijs
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Univerisity of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35 (viv 149), 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. taina.rantanen@jyu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 05 02; 18(1):565
Date
05-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Resilience, Psychological
Social Support
Abstract
Population aging increases the need for knowledge on positive aspects of aging, and contributions of older people to their own wellbeing and that of others. We defined active aging as an individual's striving for elements of wellbeing with activities as per their goals, abilities and opportunities. This study examines associations of health, health behaviors, health literacy and functional abilities, environmental and social support with active aging and wellbeing. We will develop and validate assessment methods for physical activity and physical resilience suitable for research on older people, and examine their associations with active aging and wellbeing. We will examine cohort effects on functional phenotypes underlying active aging and disability.
For this population-based study, we plan to recruit 1000 participants aged 75, 80 or 85 years living in central Finland, by drawing personal details from the population register. Participants are interviewed on active aging, wellbeing, disability, environmental and social support, mobility, health behavior and health literacy. Physical activity and heart rate are monitored for 7 days with wearable sensors. Functional tests include hearing, vision, muscle strength, reaction time, exercise tolerance, mobility, and cognitive performance. Clinical examination by a nurse and physician includes an electrocardiogram, tests of blood pressure, orthostatic regulation, arterial stiffness, and lung function, as well as a review of chronic and acute conditions and prescribed medications. C-reactive protein, small blood count, cholesterol and vitamin D are analyzed from blood samples. Associations of factors potentially underlying active aging and wellbeing will be studied using multivariate methods. Cohort effects will be studied by comparing test results of physical and cognitive functioning with results of a cohort examined in 1989-90.
The current study will renew research on positive gerontology through the novel approach to active aging and by suggesting new biomarkers of resilience and active aging. Therefore, high interdisciplinary impact is expected. This cross-sectional study will not provide knowledge on temporal order of events or causality, but an innovative cross-sectional dataset provides opportunities for emergence of novel creative hypotheses and theories.
PubMed ID
29716566 View in PubMed
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An international comparison of the association among literacy, education, and health across the United States, Canada, Switzerland, Italy, Norway, and Bermuda: implications for health disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264798
Source
J Health Commun. 2015 Apr;20(4):406-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Takashi Yamashita
Suzanne R Kunkel
Source
J Health Commun. 2015 Apr;20(4):406-15
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bermuda
Canada
Educational Status
Female
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Internationality
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Switzerland
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between education and health is well-established, but theoretical pathways are not fully understood. Economic resources, stress, and health behaviors partially explain how education influences health, but further study is needed. Previous studies show that health literacy mediates the education-health relationship, as do general literacy skills. However, little is known whether such mediation effects are consistent across different societies. This study analyzed data from the International Assessment of Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey conducted in Canada, the United States, Italy, Norway, Switzerland, and Bermuda to investigate the mediation effects of literacy on the education-health relationship and the degree of such mediation in different cultural contexts. Results showed that literacy skills mediated the effect of education on health in all study locations, but the degree of mediation varied. This mediation effect was particularly strong in Bermuda. This study also found that different types of literacy skills are more or less important in each study location. For example, numeracy skills in the United States and prose (reading) literacy skills in Italy were stronger predictors of health than were other literacy skills. These findings suggest a new direction for addressing health disparities: focusing on relevant types of literacy skills.
PubMed ID
25749096 View in PubMed
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Assessing adolescents' perceived proficiency in critically evaluating nutrition information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296858
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 28; 15(1):61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-28-2018
Author
Desire Alice Naigaga
Kjell Sverre Pettersen
Sigrun Henjum
Øystein Guttersrud
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Kunnskapsveien 55, 2007, KC228, Kjeller, Norway. dnaiga@oslomet.no.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 28; 15(1):61
Date
06-28-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Communication
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutritive Value
Perception
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Over the recent past, there has been an increase in nutrition information available to adolescents from various sources, which resulted into confusion and misinterpretation of the dietary advice. Results from international assessment frameworks such as PISA and TIMMS reflect the need for adolescents to critically appraise health information. While a number of scales measuring the critical health literacy of individuals exist; very few of these are devoted to critical nutrition literacy. More so, these scales target individuals with an advanced level of nutrition education, often gaging their proficiency in information appraisal in relation to principles of evidence-based medical research. The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of a newly developed critical nutrition literacy scale (CNL-E) measuring adolescents' perceived proficiency in 'critically evaluating nutrition information from various sources'.
During spring 2015, more than 1600 tenth graders aged 15-16 years from approximately 60 schools in Norway responded to the five-item questionnaire using an electronic survey system. Applying Rasch analysis approach, we examined the psychometric properties of the CNL-E scale employing the RUMM2030 statistical package. To further investigate the dimensionality of the scale and test the underlying structure, we applied multidimensional Rasch modelling using the ConQuest 4 software and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the Lisrel 9.30 software.
In our sample, the CNL-E stood out as a valid, reliable and well-targeted scale with good overall fit to the partial credit parameterization of the polytomous unidimensional Rasch model (PCM). All the items were sufficiently statistically independent, had ordered response categories and showed acceptable individual fit to the PCM. No item displayed within-item bias or differential item functioning (DIF).
From the observed CNL-E sum score, it is possible to draw plausible conclusions about how individuals critically evaluate nutrition information. Efforts to improve communication of nutrition information could benefit from applying validated measures such as the CNL-E scale. The CNL-E scale provides insight into how individuals without an advanced level of nutrition education, such as adolescents, determine the validity and reliability of nutrition information from various sources.
PubMed ID
29954397 View in PubMed
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Assessment of health literacy among older Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299832
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Johanna Eronen
Leena Paakkari
Erja Portegijs
Milla Saajanaho
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014, Jyvaskyla, Finland. johanna.eronen@jyu.fi.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2019 Apr; 31(4):549-556
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Focus Groups
Health Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This study examined the feasibility of the HLS-EU-Q16 (in Finnish) for use among older Finns and whether the health literacy score correlates with indicators of health and functioning.
To determine the feasibility of the instrument, we first conducted a focus group discussion with nine participants. For the quantitative analyses, we used data from the AGNES cohort study, collected between October 2017 and April 2018 at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. 292 75-year-old Finnish men and women were interviewed face-to-face in their homes. Health literacy was measured with the HLS-EU-Q16 and health literacy score, ranging from 0 to 50, computed. The reproducibility of the instrument was test-retested. Chi-square tests were used to compare health literacy scores between participants by different socioeconomic variables, and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to study the associations of health literacy with cognition, depressive symptoms, chronic conditions, life-space mobility and physical performance.
The mean health literacy score for all participants was 35.05 (SD 6.32). Participants who rated their financial situation and self-rated health as very good had the highest health literacy scores (38.85, SD 5.09 and 39.22, SD 6.77, respectively). Better health literacy was associated with better cognitive status, fewer depressive symptoms and chronic conditions, higher life-space mobility and better physical performance.
The HLS-EU-Q16 is a feasible measure for research purposes among older Finns. The associations between health literacy and indicators of health and functioning need to be more closely investigated in larger samples with a wider age-range.
PubMed ID
30578457 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about causes of colon cancer by English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132620
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Jennifer Elizabeth McWhirter
Laura E Todd
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Communication Barriers
Culture
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Language
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Risk factors
Abstract
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Canadians. Immigrants underutilize screening and may be at greater risk of late stage diagnosis and death from the disease. This mixed-methods study investigated the self-reported causes of colon cancer by 66 English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada after reading a fact sheet which listed two causes of colon cancer (polyps and cause unknown) and six ways to help prevent colon cancer (lifestyle, diet, weight, smoking, alcohol, and screening). Women correctly named or described both causes (6.1%) or one cause (22.7%), could not name or describe either cause (19.7%), or named or described causes not included on the fact sheet (54.5%). The most common causes reported by participants were "risk factors": diet (53.0%), family history (28.8%), and lifestyle (22.7%). Women confused cause with risk factor and infrequently mentioned screening. Possible reasons for their reported beliefs are discussed.
PubMed ID
21800045 View in PubMed
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A Canadian exploratory study to define a measure of health literacy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135897
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Deborah Leslie Begoray
Brenda Kwan
Author Affiliation
Curriculum & Instruction, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, Canada. dbegoray@uvic.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Mar;27(1):23-32
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Comprehension
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - standards
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
Abstract
This study undertook a qualitative exploration of an operational definition of health literacy and an examination of quantitative measures of health literacy skills. We interviewed 229 older Canadian adults. First we engaged them in open-ended discussions about their search for information on a self-selected health topic. Next we administered nine self-report items on health literacy skills, and then task-performance items. Task-performance questions were based on two published reading passages on five levels of difficulty to measure 'understanding' of health-related material. The Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) was also administered as the comparison for criterion-related validity. Our open-ended questions elicited responses about the processes that people undergo when they attempt to access, understand, appraise and communicate health information. Qualitative findings revealed complexities in participants' interpretation of the meaning of all four health literacy skills. These descriptive findings add new knowledge about health literacy as a construct. Participants agreed with most of the self-report statements, thus indicating high belief in their own health literacy. REALM scores ranged from 45 to 66 with an average of 65 and standard deviation of 2.5. Quantitative scores on the reading passages were modestly correlated with scores on the REALM. The sum scale of self-report items, however, did not correlate with task-performance items, suggesting that the different types of items may not be measuring the same construct. We suggest that self-report items need more development and validation. Our study makes a contribution in exploring the complexities of measuring health literacy skills for general health contexts.
PubMed ID
21436143 View in PubMed
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Cancer information comprehension by English-as-a-second-language immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138957
Source
J Health Commun. 2011 Jan;16(1):17-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
M D Thomson
L. Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Health Commun. 2011 Jan;16(1):17-33
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis
Comprehension
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Ontario
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Limited acculturation and socioeconomic factors have been associated with lower participation in cancer screening. Limited comprehension of cancer prevention information may contribute to this association. The authors used a stepwise linear regression to model acculturation and socioeconomic factors as predictors of comprehension (colon cancer and general health information) and screening intention in a sample of 78 Spanish-speaking immigrant women in Canada. The authors used the McNemar test to look for changes in women's screening intention. They used the Bidimensional Acculturation Scale, a language-based scale, to assess acculturation. Among English-as-a-second-language immigrant women, acculturation, television and Internet use, age, and Spanish-language education predicted comprehension of cancer prevention information, F(3, 69) = 6.76, p 
PubMed ID
21120740 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer screening among immigrant women in Norway- The healthcare providers' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297703
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Dec; 36(4):415-422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Kathy Ainul Møen
Laura Terragni
Bernadette Kumar
Esperanza Diaz
Author Affiliation
a Department of Global Public Health and Primary care , University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2018 Dec; 36(4):415-422
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Culture
Early Detection of Cancer
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Women's health
Abstract
To explore health care providers' (HCPs) experiences regarding cervical cancer screening (CCS) among immigrant women, their strategies to facilitate these consultations and their need for further information.
Exploratory qualitative design.
HCPs who perform CCS: general practitioners, midwives and private gynaecologists, working in Oslo, Norway.
We interviewed 26 general practitioners, 3 midwives and 3 gynaecologists.
Both focus groups and personal in depth semi structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analysed using a thematic analysis approach.
Some of the HCPs' experiences related to CCS were common for all women regardless of their immigrant background, such as the understanding of routines and responsibilities for prevention. Aspects specific for immigrant women were mainly related to organization, language, health literacy levels, culture and gender. Several strategies targeting organizational (longer consultations), language (using interpreters), health literacy (using anatomy models to explain) and culture (dealing with the expression of pain) were reported. Most HCPs had not previously reflected upon specific challenges linked to CCS among immigrant women, thus the interviews were an eye-opener to some extent. HCPs acknowledged that they need more knowledge on immigrant women's' reproductive health.
HCPs' biases, stereotypes and assumptions could be a key provider-level barrier to low uptake of CCS test among immigrants if they remained unexplored and unchallenged. HCPs need more information on reproductive health of immigrant women in addition to cultural awareness. Key Points The participation rate of immigrant women to cervical cancer screening in Norway is low, compared to non-immigrants. This might be partly attributed to health care system and provider, and not only due to the women's preferences. Our focus groups and interviews among health care providers show, that in addition to cultural competence and awareness, they need knowledge on reproductive health of immigrants. We recommend an intervention targeting health care providers to close the gap in cervical cancer screening.
PubMed ID
30289317 View in PubMed
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Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107672
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
outcomes. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley and Sons; 2008. p. 58. 22. Nutbeam D. The evolving concept of health literacy. Soc Sci Med. 2008;67:2072-8. 23. Lipkus I, Samsa G, Rimer BK. General performance on a numeracy scale among highly educated samples. Med Decis Making. 2001;21:37-44. 24
  1 document  
Author
Amy Colquhoun
Janis Geary
Karen J Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Communication
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Health Literacy
Helicobacter Infections - prevention & control
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Public Health - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to illustrate, from a researcher's perspective, some of the challenges of conducting public health research in teams comprising members with varying backgrounds. The consequences of these challenges will be outlined, and potential solutions will be offered.
Notes
Cites: Med Decis Making. 2001 Jan-Feb;21(1):37-4411206945
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Mar;42(1):119-2720420096
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):374-8319024806
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Aug;98(8):1398-40618556605
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):24-3918714896
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Dec;67(12):2072-818952344
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Mar;22(3):289-9518354758
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Jan;98(1):22-718048800
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2006 May;61(2):173-9016122896
Cites: J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005 Oct;10(4):203-1116259686
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:139-4315736639
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2005 Feb;32(1):84-10115642756
PubMed ID
23986884 View in PubMed
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Changes in attitudes, intended behaviour, and mental health literacy in the Swedish population 2009-2014: an evaluation of a national antistigma programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285761
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2016 Aug;134 Suppl 446:71-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
L. Hansson
S. Stjernswärd
B. Svensson
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2016 Aug;134 Suppl 446:71-9
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - trends
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental Health - education
Social Stigma
Sweden
Abstract
Public stigma of mental illness is still a major problem where numerous population studies during the last decade have mainly shown no improvements. A Swedish national antistigma campaign has been running 2010-2014. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in public stigma during this period as compared to baseline in 2009.
Yearly population surveys were made between 2009 and 2014 including assessments of mental health literacy, attitudes, and intended future behaviour. Two surveys were made, one including a nationally representative sample and one including a representative sample from three original campaign regions. Multiple regression analyses, also including age, gender, education, and familiarity with mental illness were made to investigate yearly changes in public stigma compared to baseline.
Mental health literacy improved significantly in the campaign regions between 2009 and 2014, as did intended future behaviour. Attitudes toward mental illness also improved significantly. Improvements were also shown in the national population surveys, but the time pattern of these compared to that of the original campaign regions indicated that these changes took place mainly after the campaign had been extended to a further five Swedish regions.
The results of our surveys suggest that a campaign primarily based on social contact theory and involving people with lived experience of mental illness may, even in a rather short-term perspective, have a significant positive impact on mental health literacy, attitudes, and intentions of social contact with people with mental illness.
PubMed ID
27426648 View in PubMed
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102 records – page 1 of 11.