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The acceptability and feasibility of an intercultural birth center in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114720
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Kathryn Tucker
Hector Ochoa
Rosario Garcia
Kirsty Sievwright
Amy Chambliss
Margaret C Baker
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, NHS, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:94
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Birthing Centers - utilization
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Home Childbirth
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Mexico
Midwifery - education - standards
Patient Preference - ethnology
Pregnancy
Abstract
An intercultural birthing house was established in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, as an intervention to reduce maternal mortality among indigenous women. This birth center, known locally as the Casa Materna, is a place where women can come to give birth with their traditional birth attendant. However, three months after opening, no woman had used the birthing house.
This study reports on the knowledge, attitudes and practices related to childbirth and use of the Casa Materna from the perspective of the health workers, traditional birth attendants and the program's target population. Structured interviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with participants from each of these groups. Data was searched for emerging themes and coded.
Findings show that the potential success of this program is jeopardized by lack of transport and a strong cultural preference for home births. The paper highlights the importance of community participation in planning and implementing such an intervention and of establishing trust and mutual respect among key actors. Recommendations are provided for moving forward the maternal health agenda of indigenous women in Chiapas.
Notes
Cites: J Sex Res. 2002 Feb;39(1):58-6212476258
Cites: Midwifery. 2004 Sep;20(3):217-2515337277
Cites: Salud Publica Mex. 2004 Sep-Oct;46(5):388-9815521523
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(4):785-9515950091
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jun 3;367(9525):1859-6916753489
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Sep 30;368(9542):1189-20017011946
Cites: J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2007;3:3117803820
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Mar;66(5):1057-6918187246
Cites: Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2008 Aug;24(2):75-8419062598
Cites: Midwifery. 2009 Aug;25(4):411-2118053623
Cites: Health Policy Plan. 2011 Nov;26(6):496-50721278371
PubMed ID
23587122 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection: prospective cohort study in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115630
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
P W Colson
Y. Hirsch-Moverman
J. Bethel
P. Vempaty
K. Salcedo
K. Wall
W. Miranda
S. Collins
C R Horsburgh
Author Affiliation
Charles P Felton National Tuberculosis Center, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. pwc2@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Latent Tuberculosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Refusal
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An estimated 300?000 individuals are treated for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in the United States and Canada annually. Little is known about the proportion or characteristics of those who decline treatment.
To define the proportion of individuals in various groups who accept LTBI treatment and to identify factors associated with non-acceptance of treatment.
Persons offered LTBI treatment at 30 clinics in 12 Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium sites were prospectively enrolled. Multivariate regression models were constructed based on manual stepwise assessment of potential predictors.
Of 1692 participants enrolled from March 2007 to September 2008, 1515 (89.5%) accepted treatment and 177 (10.5%) declined. Predictors of acceptance included believing one could personally spread TB germs, having greater TB knowledge, finding clinic schedules convenient and having low acculturation. Predictors of non-acceptance included being a health care worker, being previously recommended for treatment and believing that taking medicines would be problematic.
This is the first prospective multisite study to examine predictors of LTBI treatment acceptance in general clinic populations. Greater efforts should be made to increase acceptance among health care workers, those previously recommended for treatment and those who expect problems with LTBI medicines. Ensuring convenient clinic schedules and TB education to increase knowledge could be important for ensuring acceptance.
PubMed ID
23485381 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native adolescent views on cervical cancer, the human papillomavirus (HPV), genital warts and the quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101622
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Melissa Kemberling
Kyla Hagan
Jessica Leston
Sassa Kitka
Ellen Provost
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center, Anchorage, Alaska, 99508, USA. mmkemberling@anthc.org.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):245-53
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines
Adolescent
Alaska
Alphapapillomavirus
Child
Condylomata Acuminata
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Papillomavirus Infections
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Abstract
Objectives. To understand the knowledge levels, attitudes and perceptions of Alaska Native adolescent girls about cervical cancer, HPV, genital warts and the HPV vaccine. Study design. A qualitative study. Methods. Seventy-nine in-depth interviews were conducted with adolescent females aged 11 through 18 years in 4 communities in Alaska. The convenience sample was recruited through word of mouth, posters and flyers distributed in community schools, medical clinics and stores. Results. Many of those surveyed didn't know the purpose of a vaccine and were not familiar with basic knowledge about HPV, genital warts and cervical cancer. After learning about cervical cancer and HPV, most teens felt that someone their age had an average likelihood of contracting the diseases and that having the disease would be quite bad. Most teens said they were interested in vaccination. When asked if they would get a vaccine, older teens most commonly cited concerns about side effects or doubts about vaccine efficacy, while younger teens were afraid the shot would hurt. Most teens stated that they preferred to learn about health topics such as these through television programming, followed by the Internet, brochures and posters. Conclusions. The findings provide valuable information on how to inform adolescents about the vaccine and alleviate their concerns. The design of an educational campaign should vary depending on the age of the adolescents. For younger teens, distribution of information should be at school using a brochure or curriculum, while for older teens a web page may be more appropriate.
PubMed ID
21703130 View in PubMed
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Anishinabe youth perceptions about community health: toward environmental repossession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263059
Source
Health Place. 2014 Mar;26:127-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Katie Big-Canoe
Chantelle A M Richmond
Source
Health Place. 2014 Mar;26:127-35
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Networks
Environmental health
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
This community-based research applied environmental dispossession as a theoretical framework for understanding Anishinabe youth perceptions about health, social relationships and contemporary Anishinabe way of life in Northern Ontario, Canada. Qualitative interviews with 19 youth reveal considerable worry about their community's health. Youth perceive changes in the Anishinabe way of life, including decreased access to their traditional lands, to be central to poor health at the community level. Youth emphasized the importance of social relationships for fostering healthy behaviours and developing community wide initiatives that will provide opportunities for reconnecting to land, and for learning and practicing Indigenous Knowledge. This study builds on the growing body of decolonizing research with Indigenous communities, and it concludes by offering the concept of environmental repossession as a way forward for studies on the Indigenous environment-health interface.
PubMed ID
24440804 View in PubMed
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Associations between pedagogues attitudes, praxis and policy in relation to physical activity of children in kindergarten--results from a cross sectional study of health behaviour amongst Danish pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131117
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Oct;6 Suppl 2:12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Bent Egberg Mikkelsen
Author Affiliation
Research Group for Meal Science & Public Health Nutrition, Department of Development and Planning, Aalborg University, Lautrupvang 1A, DK-2750 Ballerup, Denmark.
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Oct;6 Suppl 2:12-5
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Denmark
Environment
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Policy - trends
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Motor Activity
Questionnaires
Schools
Abstract
This paper reports on associations between physical activity, pedagogue's attitudes towards promoting physical activity and the physical activity policies (PAP) in kindergarten. The paper deals with data on physical activity of 3-6 year olds in kindergarten which originates from a cross-sectional study conducted in 2006 among all Danish kindergartens. A questionnaire of 48 questions based on pedagogues assessment regarding the health related polcies and praxis in kindergarten and the attitudes of pedagogues was mailed (n = 4200) to all institutions in the country. In total, 1149 kindergartens and 693 integrated institutions returned the survey. The results show a relation between pedagogue's attitudes towards promoting children's physical activity and the number of children having moderately intense physical activity for at least one hour a day. The study also shows a positive association between policies and pedagogue's attitudes towards promoting children's physical activity and the number of days that pedagogues initiated games that made the children physically active. The study suggests that the social and organizational environment in the kindergarten is an important determinant for the level of physical activity among children. This means that the individual norms and attitudes of pedagogues along with the collective intentions and values expressed in written and adopted organizational policies (a Physical Activity Policy--PAP) are important aspects to be worked upon if kindergarten should play an active role in the promotion of healthy lifestyle among kindergarten aged children. Strong municipal and institutional leadership as well as educational interventions in the curricula of pedagogues could be important ways to bring about such change.
PubMed ID
21923289 View in PubMed
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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards family formation in cohabiting and single childless women in their mid- to late thirties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281959
Source
Hum Fertil (Camb). 2016 Apr;19(1):48-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Kathrine Birch Petersen
Randi Sylvest
Anders Nyboe Andersen
Anja Pinborg
Helene Westring Hvidman
Lone Schmidt
Source
Hum Fertil (Camb). 2016 Apr;19(1):48-55
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Denmark
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Family Planning Services
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infertility, Female - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Parenting - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Behavior - ethnology
Self Report
Single Person
Single-Parent Family - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study aimed to explore attitudes towards family formation in single or cohabiting childless women of advanced age. The design comprised semi-structured qualitative interviews of 20 women aged 34-39 years attending the Fertility Assessment and Counselling Clinic, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. A sample of 10 single women and 10 cohabiting women was chosen with equal distribution of postgraduate education length. Data were analysed using content analysis following the method of Graneheim and Lundman and consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ). The general attitude towards family formation was characterized by a fear of the consequences of choosing motherhood on one hand, and a 'ticking biological clock' and a wish to establish a nuclear family on the other. The women idealized the perception of perfect mothering in terms of uncompromising expectations of child rearing and showed an increasing awareness of solo motherhood as a possible solution to advanced age, the wish of a child and single status compared to earlier studies. Our study contributes to knowledge and understanding of personal considerations related to childbearing in nullipara women in their mid- to late 30s and may be useful in a fertility assessment and counselling setting.
PubMed ID
27006139 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccination among Arab ethnic minority in Denmark: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265152
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lina Zeraiq
Dorthe Nielsen
Morten Sodemann
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arabs - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nuclear Family - ethnology - psychology
Papillomavirus Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Knowledge regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine uptake among ethnic minorities is poorly explored in Denmark. The objective of this study was to explore attitudes and knowledge towards HPV vaccination among Arab mothers and their daughters.
Five Arabic-speaking focus groups with mothers of vaccine-eligible girls and three focus groups with daughters were conducted. The participants were recruited through different social clubs. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate attitudes and knowledge of HPV vaccination. Meaning condensation inspired by Amedeo Giorgi was used to analyse the transcribed material.
A total of 23 women and 13 daughters were included in this study. The mothers' knowledge regarding HPV was limited to the fact that HPV can cause cervical cancer. Two focus groups mentioned that HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and none of the mothers knew that HPV also causes genital warts. Both mothers and daughters acknowledged that the daughters have deeper insight into health-related issues. A gap of knowledge between generations was identified, as mothers and daughters obtained health information from different sources: mothers used the Arabic TV channels as a source of knowledge and daughters had a range of sources, e.g. school, internet, and Western TV channels. The consequence of these differences in obtaining knowledge is that mothers and daughters lack a common language to discuss health issues. Mothers were influenced by Arabic society, while daughters had created a hybrid of Arabic and Danish. Each generation had its own reasons for accepting the vaccine. The level of HPV knowledge and awareness did not affect their uptake decision in that all the participating mothers had accepted the vaccine for their daughters.
Educational programs should target both mothers and daughters because mothers have an inadequate knowledge about HPV. This is likely to bridge the gap of knowledge between mothers and daughters, which constitutes a barrier between the generations.
PubMed ID
25754868 View in PubMed
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Awareness of palliative care and end-of-life options among African Canadians in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117004
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2013 Apr;24(2):144-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Victor Maddalena
Wanda Thomas Bernard
Sharon Davis-Murdoch
Donna Smith
Author Affiliation
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. victor.maddalena@med.mun.ca
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2013 Apr;24(2):144-52
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Palliative Care
Terminal Care
Abstract
To assess, using qualitative methods, the knowledge African Canadians living in Nova Scotia have regarding their options for palliative and end-of-life (EOL) care.
This project engaged caregivers in a Black community in Nova Scotia, Canada, in an exploration of palliative and EOL care. A group of six caregivers who cared for someone who had died were recruited through purposive sampling. The caregivers met three times to (1) discuss their experiences, (2) receive a presentation from the palliative care service, and (3) discuss whether those services would be beneficial. This was followed by a community meeting to discuss the findings.
Knowledge of options for palliative care services is limited. Family centered care may be a reason why "system" is generally not aware of the EOL experiences of African Nova Scotians.
Information about palliative care services is not filtering down to the community in a way that is meaningful to families. Families tend to self-select services that assist them in providing care in the home setting. There is a need to engage Black communities and palliative care services in developing culturally appropriate services.
PubMed ID
23341407 View in PubMed
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Bidi and hookah use among Canadian youth: findings from the 2010 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114027
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2013;10:E73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Christine D Czoli
Scott T Leatherdale
Vicki Rynard
Author Affiliation
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2013;10:E73
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - trends
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk-Taking
Smoking - epidemiology - trends
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tobacco Products - utilization
Abstract
Although cigarette use among Canadian youth has decreased significantly in recent years, alternative forms of tobacco use are becoming increasingly popular. Surveillance of youth tobacco use can help inform prevention programs by monitoring trends in risk behaviors. We examined the prevalence of bidi and hookah use and factors associated with their use among Canadian youth by using data from the 2010-2011 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS).
We analyzed YSS data from 28,416 students (2006-2007) and 31,396 students (2010-2011) in grades 9 through 12 to examine prevalence of bidi and hookah use. We conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses of 2010-2011 YSS data to examine factors associated with bidi and hookah use.
From 2006 through 2010, prevalence of hookah use among Canadian youth increased by 6% (P = .02). Marijuana use emerged as a consistent predictor of bidi and hookah use. Males, youth of black, Latin, or other descent, and youth of Asian descent were more likely to use bidis (odds ratio [OR], 1.5; OR, 15.6; OR, 14.9) or hookah (OR, 1.3; OR, 2.4; OR, 1.5). Current cigarette smokers were more likely than nonsmokers to be current users of bidis (OR, 6.7) and hookahs (OR, 3.0), and occasional and frequent alcohol drinkers were also more likely than nondrinkers to be current hookah users (OR, 2.8; OR, 3.6).
Although bidi use has not changed significantly among Canadian youth, the increase in hookah use warrants attention. Understanding the factors associated with use of bidis and hookahs can inform the development of tobacco use prevention programs to address emerging at-risk youth populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23660115 View in PubMed
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