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274 records – page 1 of 28.

Access and utilization: a continuum of health service environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211173
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
M W Rosenberg
N T Hanlon
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Income
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Birch and Abelson [1] argue that non-income based barriers might explain differences in utilization of health services within and between income groups. Databases which contain utilization data rarely allow for the modelling of geographic variation. In the Ontario Health Survey (OHS), individual observations are georeferenced at the Public Health Unit (PHU) scale, but PHUs cannot easily be used because of the large coefficients of variation. To overcome this problem, a cluster analysis is performed to create a service environment variable, which reflects differences in service availability, population size and rurality. Utilization of health services is then modelled as a logistic regression equation where the independent variables are age, sex, service environment and income to test the Birch and Abelson argument. This argument is then extended by controlling for age, health and income status. Based on the modelling results, the importance of geography to access and utilization is assessed.
PubMed ID
8888467 View in PubMed
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[Ackis, seen through a social scientist's eyes. A working place with order, competence and a dismal environment. Interview by Charlotte Terner.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51365
Source
Vardfacket. 1987 Nov 26;11(21):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1987
Author
K. Berg
Source
Vardfacket. 1987 Nov 26;11(21):14-5
Date
Nov-26-1987
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Health facilities
Health Facility Environment
Hospital Administration
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
3439305 View in PubMed
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Addressing the turnover issue among new nurses from a generational viewpoint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155071
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
Linda O'Brien-Pallas
Céline Gélinas
Nicole Desforges
Caroline Marchionni
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, QC, Canada. melanie.lavoie-tremblay@mcgill.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2008 Sep;16(6):724-33
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Intergenerational Relations
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Professional Autonomy
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the relationship between dimensions of the psychosocial work environment and the intent to quit among a new generation of nurses.
As a new generation of nurses enters the workforce, we know little about their perception of their current work environment and its impact on their intent to stay.
A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1002 nurses.
The nurses who intended to quit their positions perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance as well as a lack of social support. The nurses who intended to quit the profession perceived a significant effort/reward imbalance, high psychological demands and elevated job strain.
The balance between the level of effort expended and reward received plays an important role in young nurses' intent to leave.
Nurse Managers must offer Nexters, from the beginning of their career, a meaningful work and supportive environment. Without the efforts of the organization to improve the work environment and support nurses, this generation may not feel valued and move to another organization that will support them or another career that will offer fulfilment.
PubMed ID
18808467 View in PubMed
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Advice concerning breastfeeding from mothers of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit: the Roy adaptation model as a conceptual structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59542
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):54-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
K H Nyqvist
P O Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 95F, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):54-63
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding
Counseling - methods - standards
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Models, Nursing
Mothers - education - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Data were collected by telephone interviews with 178 mothers of full-term patients in a NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) concerning advice on facilitation of the initiation of breastfeeding. The main advice to the first author as a nurse in the NICU concerned the environment, advice on breastfeeding, distance between units, work organization and nurse behaviour. The advice to other mothers of patients centred on persistence, physical contact with the infant, and not to let nurses take over maternal role functions. The data were structured into themes and categories, classified by one author and two research assistants according to Roy's adaptation theory, and analysed for degree of interrater agreement. The overall agreement of classification was high, reaching 92.5%. It was easily applied by nurses after a brief introduction and proved useful for structuring interview data. It also contributed to clarification of nurse behaviour and division of roles between nurses and mothers. As the four adaptation modes showed considerable overlap, this kind of classification seems inadvisable for application to the assessment of patient/parent situations in the nursing process. For use in a clinical setting, the theory needs the addition of the interactive aspect of nurse and patient/family role functions, and may then be used as a framework for the development of assessment tools.
PubMed ID
8429168 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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An Elder-Friendly Hospital: translating a dream into reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177768
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Belinda Parke
Penny Brand
Author Affiliation
Older Adult Health, Chilliwack Health Services, Chilliwack, BC. bparke@shaw.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Geriatric Assessment
Health Facility Environment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Mass Screening
Needs Assessment
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Program Development
Risk assessment
Abstract
The complex health profile of an older adult entering a hospital presents staff and administrators with a new challenge. This paper documents the Vancouver Island Health Authority's (VIHA) move towards an Elder-Friendly Hospital (EFH). A new approach to hospital care is described, one that takes account not only of an acute healthcare crisis, but also the developmental phenomena associated with aging, with the likelihood of chronic illnesses compounding both diagnosis and treatment. Customized strategies and suggestions for implementation that may be useful to other healthcare agencies are explained.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):76-715503918
PubMed ID
15503917 View in PubMed
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An exploration of environmental variables and patient falls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244453
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jun;58(6):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1981

274 records – page 1 of 28.