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[5-day work week in antitubercular dispensaries in the Ukrainian SSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70111
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1970;48(6):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
N A Maslenkova
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1970;48(6):14-7
Date
1970
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Health Facilities - utilization
Humans
Time Factors
Tuberculosis - therapy
Ukraine
PubMed ID
5447926 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of efficiency of the region's health facilities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185684
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):43-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
T V Chernova
M V Koletova
A B Blokhin
E V Polzik
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Jan-Feb;(1):43-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Care Reform
Health Facilities - utilization
Health Facility Administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Regional Health Planning
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A comprehensive study of the efficiency of activities of 5 principle therapeutic-and-preventive institutions (TPI) was conducted in a typical Ural industrial region by using the traditional and newly developed approaches. Both the medical and economic efficiency of their activities was found to be not high in a majority of them. The analysis results were used to work out a scientifically substantiated program for reforming the health care system of the region.
PubMed ID
12712566 View in PubMed
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[Community care. The meaning of 24-hour continuous home nursing in a community].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233195
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 Apr 21;76(8):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1988

Effects of municipality factors on care transitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114573
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Aug;41(6):604-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Mari Aaltonen
Leena Forma
Pekka Rissanen
Jani Raitanen
Marja Jylhä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. mari.s.aaltonen@uta.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Aug;41(6):604-15
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cities
Continuity of Patient Care - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Facilities - utilization
Home Care Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Registries
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To analyse whether transitions between care settings differ between municipalities in the last 2 years of life among older people in Finland.
Data were derived from Finnish national registers, and include all those who died in 2002 and 2003 at the age of 70 or older except those living in very small municipalities (n=67,027). Data include admissions and discharges from health and social care facilities (university hospitals, general hospitals, health centres, residential care facilities) and time spent outside care facilities for 730 days prior to death. Three-level negative binomial regression analyses were performed to study the effect of municipal factors on (1) the total number of all care transitions, (2) the number of transitions between home and different care facilities, and (3) transitions between different care facilities.
The municipality of residence had only a minor effect on the total number of care transitions, but greater variation between municipalities was found when different types of care transition were examined separately. Largest differences were found in care transitions involving specialised care. Age structure, urbanity, and economic situation of the municipality had an impact on several different care transitions.
The total number of care transitions in 2 final years of life was approximately similar irrespective of the municipality of residence, but the findings imply differences in transitioning specialised care. Potentially, this may suggest inequality between the municipalities, but more detailed studies are needed to confirm the factors underlying these differences.
PubMed ID
23604036 View in PubMed
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Health status and health care of immigrants in Canada: a longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175246
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005 Apr;10(2):77-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Bruce Newbold
Author Affiliation
School of Geography and Geology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. newbold@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Health Serv Res Policy. 2005 Apr;10(2):77-83
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Facilities - utilization
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
This paper focuses upon health status, need for care, and use of health care from 1994/95 to 2000/01 in the Canadian foreign-born population.
Using Statistics Canada's longitudinal National Population Health Survey, descriptive and survival analyses are used to explore immigrant health status and health care.
The health status of immigrants quickly declines after arrival, with a concomitant increase in use of health care services. However, survival analysis of the risk of a change to poor health indicates no difference between immigrants and the native-born. Similarly, there is no difference in the risk of hospital use between the two populations.
The health status of recent immigrant arrivals is observed to decline towards that of the native-born population, while health care utilization increases. However, increased use may not be sufficient to offset declines in health, meaning that need for health care within the immigrant population may be unmet.
PubMed ID
15831190 View in PubMed
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Health status, needs, and health care barriers among the homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6112
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 1998 May;9(2):140-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Wojtusik
M C White
Author Affiliation
HIV Services, Holyoke Health Center, Inc., MA 01040, USA.
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 1998 May;9(2):140-52
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Facilities - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
San Francisco
Sex Factors
Abstract
Perceived health status, health conditions, and access and barriers to care are important predictors of mortality and the use of services among the homeless. This study assesses these issues by structured interview of 128 homeless adults from San Francisco. Of these adults, 21.1 percent were women (mean age 37 compared to 42 for men). In terms of ethnicity, 38 percent were white; 30 percent were African American; 17 percent were Latino; and 15 percent were Asian/Pacific Islander, Native American/Alaskan, or of mixed ethnicity. Of these adults, 49 percent rated health as poor or fair. Men were four times as likely as women to report their health status as excellent or good. Persons of color were more likely to report unmet needs for shelter, regular meals, employment, and job skills/training. These findings add information on those homeless not often included in research and indicate that these marginalized individuals may be in the poorest health.
PubMed ID
10073199 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(2):127-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J L Menic
Source
Health Rep. 1990;2(2):127-39
Date
1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Factors
Health Facilities - utilization
Health Resources
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Microcomputers
Software
Abstract
A new database developed by the Canadian Centre for Health Information (CCHI) contains 40 key health indicators and lets users select a range of disaggregations, categories and variables. The database can be accessed through CANSIM, Statistics Canada's electronic database and retrieval system, or through a package for personal computers. This package includes the database on diskettes, as well as software for retrieving and manipulating data and for producing graphics. A data dictionary, a user's guide and tables and graphs that highlight aspects of each indicator are also included.
PubMed ID
2101278 View in PubMed
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Optimizing the two-step floating catchment area method for measuring spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133050
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:166
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
André Ngamini Ngui
Philippe Apparicio
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 6875 Bld, Lasalle, Verdun, Montréal (Québec), H4H 1R3, Canada. andre.ngui@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:166
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Facilities - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Primary Health Care
Quebec
Young Adult
Abstract
Reducing spatial access disparities to healthcare services is a growing priority for healthcare planners especially among developed countries with aging populations. There is thus a pressing need to determine which populations do not enjoy access to healthcare, yet efforts to quantify such disparities in spatial accessibility have been hampered by a lack of satisfactory measurements and methods. This study compares an optimised and the conventional version of the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method to assess spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal.
We first computed catchments around existing medical clinics of Montreal Island based on the shortest network distance. Population nested in dissemination areas were used to determine potential users of a given medical clinic. To optimize the method, medical clinics (supply) were weighted by the number of physicians working in each clinic, while the previous year's medical clinic users were computed by ten years age group was used as weighting coefficient for potential users of each medical clinic (demand).
The spatial accessibility score (SA) increased considerably with the optimisation method. Within a distance of 1 Km, for instance, the maximum clinic accessible for 1,000 persons is 2.4 when the conventional method is used, compared with 27.7 for the optimized method. The t-test indicates a significant difference between the conventional and the optimized 2SFCA methods. Also, results of the differences between the two methods reveal a clustering of residuals when distance increases. In other words, a low threshold would be associated with a lack of precision.
Results of this study suggest that a greater effort must be made ameliorate spatial accessibility to medical clinics in Montreal. To ensure that health resources are allocated in the interest of the population, health planners and the government should consider a strategy in the sitting of future clinics which would provide spatial access to the greatest number of people.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21745402 View in PubMed
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Physician visits and prescribed drugs among young children and their mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38754
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1987 Nov;5(4):225-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987
Author
F. Rasmussen
B. Smedby
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1987 Nov;5(4):225-31
Date
Nov-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child, Preschool
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Facilities - utilization
Humans
Infant
Maternal Age
Maternal-Child Health Centers - utilization
Middle Aged
Prescriptions, Drug
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The extent to which use of medical services by young children could be predicted by mothers' use of medical services and by certain family characteristics has been studied. The study population comprised 591 children two to four years of age in a Swedish rural municipality. Register data on physician visits and prescription drug purchases during 1979 constituted main sources of information. Statistically significant positive associations were found between number of physician visits made by the children and by their mothers and between number of prescription drug purchases made for the children and for the mothers. More physician visits and prescription drug purchases were made for the children of younger mothers than for those of older mothers. Six to eight per cent of the variation in the use of medical services by the young children was explained in multiple regression models including mainly mothers' use of medical care, mothers' age and children's age.
PubMed ID
3423493 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.