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Analysis of primary health care utilisation in south-western Finland--a tool for management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182681
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Dec;66(3):229-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
P T Ovaskainen
P T Rautava
A. Ojanlatva
J K Päkkilä
R M Päivärinta
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 1, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland. paivi.ovaskainen@utu.fi
Source
Health Policy. 2003 Dec;66(3):229-38
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases as Topic
Decision Support Systems, Management
Finland
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
International Classification of Diseases
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - utilization
Needs Assessment
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - economics - utilization
Social Class
Abstract
Long-term health care planning is presently not based on the needs of the population at the local level in Finland but rather, it is based on retroactive economic values and already realised budget in hospital and primary health care. The existing health care structure and its health care practices continue to guide the supply of services. While we have the most extensive databases on primary health care and hospital services, such tools are not used in the broadest possible sense in the present health care planning at the local level. Simple and informative indicators available to health care planners and decision-makers from databases at the local level were used to appraise the use of health care services. Statistical profiles of health care clients were classified by age groups within the health authority area (population of 13,000) of Paimio-Sauvo in south-western Finland with the intent to explain utilisation of primary health care services, their coverage, and repeat visits as well as groups not using those services. Physicians recorded reasons for each patient visit with the ICD-10 categories. In the case municipalities, primary health care services provided 100% coverage to children of 0-6 years of age and more than 70% coverage to other groups. Most primary health care expenditures were assessed for people 65 years or older in 2000. As an example of a municipality, hospital and primary health care expenditures within Paimio varied from 24 to 30.4% of the total obligations for the last 10 years.
PubMed ID
14637008 View in PubMed
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Booming prescription drug expenditure: a population-based analysis of age dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172853
Source
Med Care. 2005 Oct;43(10):996-1008
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Steven G Morgan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. morgan@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Med Care. 2005 Oct;43(10):996-1008
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug Utilization - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Population Dynamics
Prescription Fees - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Prescription drug expenditures in North America have nearly doubled in the past 5 years, creating intense pressure for all public and private benefits managers and policymakers.
The objective of this study was to describe age-specific drug expenditure trends from 1996 to 2002 for the Canadian province of British Columbia.
This study shows changes in expenditures per capita quantified for 5 age categories: residents aged 0 to 19, 20 to 44, 45 to 64, 65 to 84, and 85 and older. The cost impacts of 7 determinants of prescription drug expenditures are quantified.
This study describes population-based, patient-specific pharmaceutical data showing the type, quantity, and cost of every prescription drug purchased by virtually all residents of British Columbia.
Population-wide expenditures per capita grew at a rate of 11.6% per annum. Growth was primarily driven by the selection of more costly drugs per course of treatment and increases in the number concomitant treatments received per patient. Population aging did not have a major impact on expenditures. However, expenditure per capita grew most rapid among residents aged 45 to 64, the cohort that expended most over the period. The aging of this demographic cohort may threaten the financial viability of age-based drug benefit programs.
PubMed ID
16166869 View in PubMed
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The determinants of the public-private mix in Canadian health care expenditures: 1975-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198710
Source
Health Policy. 2000 Jun;52(2):87-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
L. Di Matteo
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Canada. livio.dimatteo@lakeheadu.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2000 Jun;52(2):87-112
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Models, Econometric
Private Sector - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Privatization - economics
Public Sector - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The health care policy issue regarding the balance between public and private health spending is examined. An empirical model of the determinants of the public-private mix in Canadian health care expenditures over the period 1975-1996 is estimated for total health care expenditures as well as separate expenditure categories such as hospitals, physicians and drugs. The results find that the key determinants of the split are per capita income, government transfer variables and the share of individual income held by the top quintile of the income distribution. Much of the public-private split is determined by long term economic forces. However, the importance of the federal health transfer variables and the variables representing shifts in fiscal transfer regimes suggest the increase in the private share of health spending since 1975 is also partly the result of the policy choice to reduce federal health transfers.
PubMed ID
10794839 View in PubMed
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Drug spending in Canada: recent trends and causes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179516
Source
Med Care. 2004 Jul;42(7):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Steve Morgan
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. morgan@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Med Care. 2004 Jul;42(7):635-42
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug Costs - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data - trends
Drug Prescriptions - economics
Drug Utilization - economics
Drug and Narcotic Control - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Models, Econometric
Abstract
Canadians spent almost dollars 15 billion, over dollars 460 per capita, on prescription drugs in 2002, yet there is little published evidence regarding the nature and causes of these expenditures.
: The objective of this study was to describe the nature and determinants of prescription drug expenditures in Canada during a recent period of rapid expenditure inflation, 1998 to 2002.
: Trends in overall expenditures and investment in specific therapeutic categories are decomposed using nonstochastic index-theoretical methods.
Changes in per capita expenditures on oral solid prescription drugs are attributed to the cost-impact of changes in the 6 determinants that fall into 3 broad categories: volume effects, price effects, and therapeutic choices.
A majority of spending was concentrated among only 5 therapeutic classes. After adjusting for generic drug use, prices for unchanged drugs declined over the period of analysis. Increased utilization of prescription drugs explained over half of the overall increase in per capita spending. Changes in therapeutic choice also contributed to cost increases.
Findings suggest that the combined affect of federal price regulations, provincial price freezes, and generic substitution policies are controlling price-related determinants of drug spending in Canada. However, the cost-impact of increased drug utilization and changes in therapeutic choices illustrate the potential pitfalls of cost-management strategies that focus primarily on prices.
PubMed ID
15213487 View in PubMed
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The effects of drug subsidies on out-of-pocket prescription drug expenditures by seniors: regional evidence from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188396
Source
J Health Econ. 2002 Sep;21(5):805-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Sule Alan
Thomas F Crossley
Paul Grootendorst
Michael R Veall
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, York University, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Health Econ. 2002 Sep;21(5):805-26
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cost Sharing
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deductibles and Coinsurance
Drug Costs
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Humans
Income - classification
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - economics - utilization
Male
Models, Econometric
National Health Programs - economics - utilization
Prescription Fees
Abstract
Between 1970 and 1986, all Canadian provinces introduced some version of a prescription drug subsidy for those aged 65 years or over and since 1986, all the provinces have increased copayments or deductibles to some degree. Employing a first-order approximation to the welfare gains from a subsidy, we find evidence that these subsidies have been less redistributive than an absolute per household cash transfer but slightly more redistributive than a transfer that would increase each household's income by the same percentage. Such evidence may have relevance for predicting the redistributive effects of a potential national prescription drug plan for seniors in the US.
PubMed ID
12349883 View in PubMed
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Estimating the cost of epilepsy in Europe: a review with economic modeling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85178
Source
Epilepsia. 2007 Dec;48(12):2224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Pugliatti Maura
Beghi Ettore
Forsgren Lars
Ekman Mattias
Sobocki Patrik
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Neurology, Medical School, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy. maurap@uniss.it
Source
Epilepsia. 2007 Dec;48(12):2224-33
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticonvulsants - economics - therapeutic use
Cost of Illness
Drug Costs
Epilepsy - economics - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Prevalence
Abstract
PURPOSE: Based on available epidemiologic, health economic, and international population statistics literature, the cost of epilepsy in Europe was estimated. METHODS: Europe was defined as the 25 European Union member countries, Iceland, Norway, and Switzerland. Guidelines for epidemiological studies on epilepsy were used for a case definition. A bottom-up prevalence-based cost-of-illness approach, the societal perspective for including the cost items, and the human capital approach as valuation principle for indirect costs were used. The cost estimates were based on selected studies with common methodology and valuation principles. RESULTS: The estimated prevalence of epilepsy in Europe in 2004 was 4.3-7.8 per 1,000. The estimated total cost of the disease in Europe was euro15.5 billion in 2004, indirect cost being the single most dominant cost category (euro8.6 billion). Direct health care costs were euro2.8 billion, outpatient care comprising the largest part (euro1.3 billion). Direct nonmedical cost was euro4.2 billion. That of antiepileptic drugs was euro400 million. The total cost per case was euro2,000-11,500 and the estimated cost per European inhabitant was euro33. CONCLUSIONS: Epilepsy is a relevant socioeconomic burden at individual, family, health services, and societal level in Europe. The greater proportion of such burden is outside the formal health care sector, antiepileptic drugs representing a smaller proportion. Lack of economic data from several European countries and other methodological limitations make this report an initial estimate of the cost of epilepsy in Europe. Prospective incidence cost-of-illness studies from well-defined populations and common methodology are encouraged.
PubMed ID
18088267 View in PubMed
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Evidence on the determinants of Canadian provincial government health expenditures: 1965-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206379
Source
J Health Econ. 1998 Apr;17(2):211-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
L. Di Matteo
R. Di Matteo
Author Affiliation
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. livio.dimatteo@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Health Econ. 1998 Apr;17(2):211-28
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Financing, Government - trends
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Policy
Humans
Income
Models, Statistical
Newfoundland and Labrador
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Real per capital provincial government expenditures on health care over the period 1965-1991 are examined using pooled time-series cross-section regression analysis: Key determinants of real per capita provincial government expenditures on health care over the period 1965-1991 are real provincial per capita income, the proportion of the provincial population over age 65 and real provincial per capita federal transfer revenues. Established program financing had a negative and significant impact on real per capita provincial government health expenditures in Newfoundland and Quebec. An income elasticity of 0.77 implies that health care is not a luxury good.
PubMed ID
10180916 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.