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565 records – page 1 of 57.

28-Joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137343
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Eva Hallert
Magnus Husberg
Thomas Skogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To explore possible association between disease activity at 3-month follow-up after RA diagnosis and costs over the following 4 years.
Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (= 1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates.
Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of = 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 = 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28
PubMed ID
21292734 View in PubMed
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The 2003 Canadian recommendations for dyslipidemia management: revisions are needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175311
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2005
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Peter Tanuseputro
Cameron A Mustard
Susan E Schultz
Geoffrey M Anderson
Sten Ardal
David A Alter
Andreas Laupacis
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ont. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-31
Date
Apr-12-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Expenditures
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Sep;24(17):1601-1012964575
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Jun 24;168(13):1644-5; author reply 1645-612821610
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Nov;19(12):1359-6614631469
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Dec;19(13):1499-50214760440
Cites: Am J Med. 2004 Apr 15;116(8):540-515063816
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Apr 21;291(15):1864-7015100205
Cites: Am Heart J. 1991 Jan;121(1 Pt 2):293-81985385
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Nov 5;339(19):1349-579841303
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Apr;15(4):445-5110322254
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Oct 28;169(9):921-414581310
Cites: Fam Pract. 2003 Feb;20(1):16-2112509365
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jul 24-31;288(4):462-712132976
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jul 24-31;288(4):455-6112132975
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Dec 22-29;282(24):2340-610612322
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 May 16;162(10):1441-710834048
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 22;163(4):403-810976255
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jul 6;360(9326):7-2212114036
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1210; author reply 121016275979
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Nov 8;173(10):1207; author reply 121016275976
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1033-4; discussion 103715824410
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2005 Jul 19;173(2):133
PubMed ID
15824409 View in PubMed
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The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
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2020 healthcare management in Canada: a new model home next door.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184152
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
D Wayne Taylor
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Date
2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Sharing
Efficiency
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Reform
Health Expenditures - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Models, organizational
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration - trends
Politics
Population Dynamics
Social Change
Social Values
Taxes - trends
Abstract
The Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada asked whether Medicare is sustainable in its present form. Well, Medicare is not sustainable for at least six reasons. Given a long list of factors, such as Canada's changing dependency ratio, the phenomenon of diminishing returns from increased taxation, competing provincial expenditure needs, low labour and technological productivity in government-funded healthcare, the expectations held by baby boomers, and the evolving value sets of Canadians--Medicare will impoverish Canada within the next couple of decades if not seriously recast. As distasteful as parallel private-pay, private-choice healthcare may be to some policy makers and providers who grew up in the 1960s, the reality of the 2020s will dictate its necessity as a pragmatic solution to a systemic problem.
PubMed ID
12908160 View in PubMed
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Achievements and challenges of medicare in Canada: Are we there yet? Are we on course?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173211
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2005;35(3):443-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Stephen Birch
Amiram Gafni
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. birch@mcmaster.ca
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2005;35(3):443-63
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Expenditures - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - utilization
Needs Assessment
Policy Making
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Universal Coverage
Abstract
Health care policy in Canada is based on providing public funding for medically necessary physician and hospital-based services free at the point of delivery ("first-dollar public funding"). Studies consistently show that the introduction of public funding to support the provision of health care services free at the point of delivery is associated with increases in the proportionate share of services used by the poor and in population distributions of services that are independent of income. Claims about the success of Canada's health care policy tend to be based on these findings, without reference to medical necessity. This article adopts a needs-based perspective to reviewing the distribution of health care services. Despite the removal of user prices, significant barriers remain to services being distributed in accordance with need-the objective of needs-based access to services remains elusive. The increased fiscal pressures imposed on health care in the 1990s, together with the failure of health care policy to encompass the changing nature of health care delivery, seem to represent further departures from policy objectives. In addition, there is evidence of increasing public dissatisfaction with the performance of the system. A return to modest increases in public funding in the new millennium has not been sufficient to arrest these trends. Widespread support for first-dollar public funding needs to be accompanied by greater attention to the scope of the legislation and the adoption of a needs-based focus among health care policymakers.
PubMed ID
16119569 View in PubMed
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[A comparative clinico-economic study of 2 models of organizational forms of psychiatric care exemplified in schizophrenia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225077
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1992;92(3):85-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
Iu V Ushakov
E D Bogdanova
S V Shipin
M G Mirzoian
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1992;92(3):85-9
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - economics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Moscow - epidemiology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors describe part of the results of a comparative clinico-economic analysis of the functioning of two models of organizational forms of psychiatric services with special reference to Moscow and Kaluga. The purpose of the given research fragment was to make a comparative analysis of expenditures on schizophrenic patients depending on the system of psychiatric services organization on the whole and between different types of services; to specify approaches to optimization of their functioning with the use of a clinico-economic approach. Based on a comparative investigation of the representative groups of schizophrenic patients (386 patients of a mental health center in Moscow and 531 patients of the Kaluga regional psychiatric hospital No. 1), it has been established that as a result of the proper organization and financing of psychiatric services in Kaluga, the "direct" expenditures on one schizophrenic patient per year could be 20% as reduced and the losses of the national income could be lowered more than 2-fold. It should necessarily be mentioned that the financing of extra hospital services in Kaluga exceeded that in Moscow more than 3-fold, reaching about 20.3% of all the expenditures on schizophrenic patients. Apparently, the organizational and financial experience gained in Kaluga with the design of the common complex and many-staged system of psychiatric services may turn fairly instrumental in elaborating approaches to optimization of the functioning of psychiatric services.
PubMed ID
1332339 View in PubMed
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[Acute myelogenous leukemia. When the choice is between a good and a bad death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26417
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Jan 24;73(2):23-5, 29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1986

Adding up provincial expenditures on health care for Manitobans: a POPULIS project. Population Health Information System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201448
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
M. Shanahan
C. Steinbach
C. Burchill
D. Friesen
C. Black
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW, Australia.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS60-82
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health Status Indicators
Home Care Services - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Infant
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - economics
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - economics
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Using the POPULIS framework, this project estimated health care expenditures across the entire population of Manitoba for inpatient and outpatient hospital utilization, physician visits, mental health inpatient, and nursing home utilization.
This estimated expenditure information was then used to compare per capita expenditures relative to premature mortality rates across the various areas of Manitoba.
Considerable variation in health care expenditures was found, with those areas having high premature mortality rates also having higher health care expenditures.
PubMed ID
10409018 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 May 23;139(21):1230-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-1977
Author
P. Ankjaer
H Y Jorgensen
O. Svendsen
A W Sorensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 May 23;139(21):1230-1
Date
May-23-1977
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Expenditures
Health facilities
Hemodialysis, Home
Humans
PubMed ID
405782 View in PubMed
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Adolescent Gambling, Gambling Expenditure and Gambling-Related Harms in Finland, 2011-2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309010
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2020 Jun; 36(2):597-610
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Susanna Raisamo
Jaana M Kinnunen
Lasse Pere
Pirjo Lindfors
Arja Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Solutions, Alcohol, Drugs and Addictions Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. susanna.raisamo@thl.fi.
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2020 Jun; 36(2):597-610
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gambling - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Primary Prevention - economics - statistics & numerical data
Self Report
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Existing literature on recent trends in adolescent gambling is scarce. The rapidly changing landscape of gambling, together with the generally applied legal age limits, calls for the continuous monitoring of gambling also among the adolescent population. In Finland, the legal gambling age is 18. We examined changes in adolescents' gambling, gambling expenditure and gambling-related harms from 2011 to 2017. Comparable cross-sectional biennial survey data were collected in 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017 among 12-18-year-olds (N?=?18,857). The main measures were self-reported six-month gambling, average weekly gambling expenditure (€) and harms due to gambling. Data were analyzed using cross-tabulations, ?2-tests and linear regression analysis. A significant decline in gambling among minors (aged 12-16-year-olds) was found (ß?=?-?0.253), while no significant changes were observed among 18-year-olds (who are not targeted by the law). The mean gambling expenditure also declined from 2011 to 2017. Adolescent gamblers experienced significantly less (p?=?.003) gambling-related harms in 2017 (7.4%) compared to 2011 (13.5%). Adolescent gambling and its related negative consequences have become less prevalent in Finland between 2011 and 2017. Further monitoring is necessary to ascertain whether the positive direction will continue. Also, empirical analyses providing evidence of reasons for the observed trend are warranted.
PubMed ID
31520272 View in PubMed
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565 records – page 1 of 57.