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[100,000 Goteburgers will learn how to save lives. Interview by Jan Thomasson.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55687
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-1985
Author
M. Blohm
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Date
Mar-7-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - organization & administration
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Resuscitation - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
3849220 View in PubMed
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The 2004 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Kelly B Zarnke
Norman R C Campbell
Ross D Feldman
Donald W McKay
Finlay A McAlister
Nadia Khan
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Martin G Myers
Peter Bolli
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Mitchell Levine
Raj Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):31-40
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory - standards
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of the diagnosis, cardiovascular risk and identifiable causes for adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of concomitant vascular risk factors, target organ damage and established atherosclerotic diseases should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, defining overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of concomitant vascular risk factors, including laboratory testing, a search for target organ damage and an assessment for modifiable causes of hypertension. Home and ambulatory blood pressure assessment and echocardiography are options for selected patients.
The identification of persons at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the quantification of overall cardiovascular risk; and the identification of persons with potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
Medline searches were conducted from November 2001, one year before the period of the last revision of the Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension, to October 2003. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of subgroup members and authors were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content experts and methodological experts.
A high value was placed on the identification of persons at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and persons with identifiable and potentially modifiable causes of hypertension.
The identification of persons at higher risk of cardiovascular disease will permit counselling for lifestyle maneuvers and introduction of antihypertensive drugs to reduce blood pressure for patients with sustained hypertension. The identification of specific causes of hypertension may permit the use of cause-specific interventions. For certain subgroups of patients and specific classes of drugs, blood pressure lowering has been associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and/or mortality.
The document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Only the recommendations that achieved high levels of consensus are reported. These guidelines will be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968141 View in PubMed
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Action Schools! BC: a socioecological approach to modifying chronic disease risk factors in elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170244
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Patti-Jean Naylor
Heather M Macdonald
Katharine E Reed
Heather A McKay
Author Affiliation
School of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria, Box 3015, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2P1. pjnaylor@uvic.ca
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Apr;3(2):A60
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Diet
Health Education - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Physical Education and Training - organization & administration - standards
Risk factors
Schools - organization & administration - standards
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children's health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach.
Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits.
Action Schools! BC, a socioecological model, was developed to create 1) an elementary school environment where students are provided with more opportunities to make healthy choices and 2) a supportive community and provincial environment to facilitate change at the school and individual levels.
The environment in British Columbia for school- and provincial-level action on health behaviors improved. Focus group and project tracking results indicated that the Action Schools! BC model enhanced the conceptual use of knowledge and was an influencing factor. Political will and public interest were also cited as influential factors.
The Action Schools! BC model required substantial and demanding changes in the approach of the researchers, policy makers, and support team toward health promotion. Despite challenges, Action Schools! BC provides a good example of how to enhance knowledge exchange and multilevel intersectoral action in chronic disease prevention.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Nov 28;163(11):1429-3311192647
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Aug;21(2):101-911457629
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Mar;26(3):425-3611896500
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Jan;47(1):6-221539925
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Feb;56(3):449-6412570966
Cites: Health Educ Q. 1988 Winter;15(4):351-773068205
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2002 Aug;23(2 Suppl):15-2512133734
PubMed ID
16539801 View in PubMed
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The adaptive nature of implementation practice: case study of a school-based nutrition education intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115493
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2013 Aug;39:10-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Sherri Bisset
Louise Potvin
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Centre de recherche Léa-Roback sur les inégalités sociales de santé de Montréal & IRSPUM, Université de Montréal Public Health Research Institute, Québec, Canada. Sherri.Bisset@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2013 Aug;39:10-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cooking
Food Habits
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Psychological
Organizational Case Studies
Poverty
Psychology, Social
Quebec
Schools
Abstract
To describe how and why nutritionists implement and strategize particular program operations across school contexts.
Instrumental case study with empirical propositions from Actor-Network Theory (ANT). Data derived from interviews with interventionists and observations of their practices.
Seven primary schools from disadvantaged Montreal neighborhoods.
Six nutritionists implementing the nutrition intervention in grades 4 and 5. From 133 nutrition workshops held in 2005/06, 31 workshops were observed with audio-recordings.
Little Cooks--Parental Networks aims to promote healthy eating behaviors through engagement in food preparation and promotion of nutrition knowledge.
The program-context interface where interventionists' practices form interactively within a given social context.
Coding inspired by ANT. Interview analysis involved construction of collective implementation strategies. Observations and audio-recordings were used to qualify and quantify nutritionists' practices against variations in implementation.
Nutritionists privileged intervention strategies according to particularities of the setting. Some such variation was accounted for by school-level social conditions, individual preferences and nutritionists' past experiences.
Implementation practices are strategic and aim to engage educational actors to achieve intervention goals. These results challenge implementation frameworks centered on purely technical considerations that exclude the social and interpretive nature of practice.
PubMed ID
23501242 View in PubMed
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AIDS and Danish adolescents--knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour relevant to the prevention of HIV-infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8370
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1990 Jun;37(3):275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Krasnik
M. Wangel
Author Affiliation
Institut for Social Medicin, Panum Institutet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1990 Jun;37(3):275-9
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Contraceptive Devices, Male - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
School Health Services - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of previous AIDS education on AIDS knowledge and sex behaviour among Danish adolescents, a survey was carried out in April-May 1988 amongst 15-16 year-old school children of 9th grade elementary school. Through a cluster-sampling procedure, 45 school classes in nine geographical areas around the country were selected representing various degrees of urbanisation. A questionnaire was handed out and collected by the local school physician during a class session. The 728 pupils responding corresponded to a response rate of 89% of the pupils enlisted and 99% of the pupils present. The results demonstrate that AIDS education has been widely introduced in Danish schools and is well accepted. However, school health services have only rarely been involved. The educational activities seem to have a positive effect on knowledge about HIV-transmission and AIDS, attitudes towards the use of condoms and actual sexual behaviour, although risk-behaviour is still prevalent. The respondents express positive attitudes towards more AIDS education--especially among those with very little or no previous educational experiences.
PubMed ID
2357908 View in PubMed
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220 records – page 1 of 22.