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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
J. Rozmus
D. Benton
F A Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Children - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oral Hygiene - education - methods
School Health Services
Tooth Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.
This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.
Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health learning in the forest and cultivated gardens: building a nutritious and sustainable food system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151012
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mirella L Stroink
Connie H Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. mstroink@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):263-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Food Supply
Forestry
Gardening - education - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Personal Satisfaction
Seafood
Abstract
Sustainable food systems are those in which diverse foods are produced in close proximity to a market. A dynamic, adaptive knowledge base that is grounded in local culture and geography and connected to outside knowledge resources is essential for such food systems to thrive. Sustainable food systems are particularly important to remote and Aboriginal communities, where extensive transportation makes food expensive and of poorer nutritional value. The Learning Garden program was developed and run with two First Nation communities in northwestern Ontario. With this program, the team adopted a holistic and experiential model of learning to begin rebuilding a knowledge base that would support a sustainable local food system. The program involved a series of workshops held in each community and facilitated by a community-based coordinator. Topics included cultivated gardening and forest foods. Results of survey data collected from 20 Aboriginal workshop participants are presented, revealing a moderate to low level of baseline knowledge of the traditional food system, and a reliance on the mainstream food system that is supported by food values that place convenience, ease, and price above the localness or cultural connectedness of the food. Preliminary findings from qualitative data are also presented on the process of learning that occurred in the program and some of the insights we have gained that are relevant to future adaptations of this program.
PubMed ID
19437287 View in PubMed
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Acceptance by Swedish users of a multimedia program for primary and secondary prevention of malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21301
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
L H Lindholm
A. Isacsson
B. Slaug
T R Möller
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Dalby/Lund, Lund University, Helgeandsgatan, Sweden.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 1998;13(4):207-12
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Occupations - education
Heliotherapy - adverse effects
Humans
Language
Male
Melanoma - prevention & control
Multimedia
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In Sweden, the incidence of malignant melanoma of the skin is rapidly increasing, and the disease is now one of the ten most common tumor types. The objectives were to apply multimedia techniques to increase public knowledge about malignant melanoma and its risk factors, to increase awareness of preventive measures, and to make people more disposed to change their sunbathing habits. METHODS: A trilingual (Swedish, English, and German) multimedia program was developed for two target groups, health care personnel and the general public, with a total of >500 "pages" in each language. User reactions were studied on-site at a municipal pharmacy and library, where the program was available in a kiosk with touch-screen. RESULTS: Practically all 274 users interviewed found the program easy to use and understand. 92% identified one or more of the recommendations given. 66% found the program information "worrying," and 29%--mainly young women-instantly declared that they were going to change their sun-exposure behaviors. No correlation to skin type was found. CONCLUSIONS: A multimedia program of the present design seems to be a useful tool for health promotion.
PubMed ID
9883779 View in PubMed
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Activism for medical geographers: American, British and Canadian viewpoints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103469
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M R Greenberg
M W Rosenberg
D R Phillips
D. Schneider
Author Affiliation
Department of Urban Studies and Community Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Consumer Advocacy
Educational Status
Great Britain
Health Education - methods
Health planning
Health Policy
Humans
Minority Groups
Research
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This paper describes some of our personal efforts to launch research projects that address public health issues of interest to geographers in the United States, Canada and Britain. In pressing these agendas we have found through our experiences that there are personal and disciplinary costs associated with activism. We describe the loss of identity with geography; the frustration of trying to persuade bench scientists, corporate representatives, and government officials of the importance of our work; the loss of research time and contact with both our academic colleagues and students.
PubMed ID
2305280 View in PubMed
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Adaptability and sustainability of an Indigenous Australian family wellbeing initiative in the context of Papua New Guinea: a follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131544
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Russel Kitau
Komla Tsey
Janya McCalman
Mary Whiteside
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Papua New Guinea, Port Moresby, PNG. rkitau@hotmail.com
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;19 Suppl 1:S80-3
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Papua New Guinea
Personal Satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This paper describes the follow-up phase of a pilot collaborative initiative between the University of Papua New Guinea and James Cook University aimed at determining the relevance of an Indigenous Australian Family Wellbeing (FWB) empowerment program in the context of Papua New Guinea (PNG). It describes opportunities and challenges involved in adapting and sustaining the FWB approach to the PNG context. Two evaluation questionnaires were administered to 60 course participants.
Findings revealed that the course was relevant, adaptable and could readily be integrated with other health programs. In the context of PNG's target to meet its United Nations Millennium Development Goals by 2015, the Family Wellbeing approach offers an innovative approach to enhance existing health and community development initiatives.
PubMed ID
21878028 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of a smoking cessation and prevention website for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98333
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Maile Taualii
Nigel Bush
Deborah J Bowen
Ralph Forquera
Author Affiliation
Seattle Indian Health Board and the Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2010 Mar;25(1):23-31
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Alaska
Child
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Male
Pilot Projects
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods
Urban Population
Abstract
Tobacco use among American Indian youth is a disproportionately significant problem. We adapted and modified an existing web-based and youth-focused tobacco control program to make it appropriate for young urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). The results of the focus group indicate that AI/AN youth were very receptive to the use of a web-based Zine-style intervention tool. They wanted the look and feel of the website to be more oriented toward their cultural images. Future research should examine if successful programs for reducing non-ceremonial tobacco use among urban AI/AN youth can keep young irregular smokers from becoming adult smokers.
PubMed ID
20082169 View in PubMed
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The added value of a brief self-efficacy coaching on the effectiveness of a 12-week physical activity program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117957
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jan Seghers
Ann-Sophie Van Hoecke
Astrid Schotte
Joke Opdenacker
Filip Boen
Author Affiliation
Dept of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):18-29
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Health Education - methods
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Metabolic Equivalent - physiology
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-efficacy has been found to be an important precondition for behavioral change in sedentary people. The current study examined the effectiveness and added value of including a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a 12-week lifestyle physical activity (PA) program.
Participants were randomly assigned to a standard-intervention group (without additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 116) or extra-intervention group (with additional self-efficacy coaching, N = 111). Body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular fitness, self-reported PA, and self-efficacy beliefs were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention period. Perceived adherence to the PA program was assessed postintervention.
At posttest, a significant increase in cardiovascular fitness and decrease in BMI were found in both groups. Significant intervention effects emerged on PA behavior, self-efficacy, and program adherence, in favor of the extra-intervention group. Self-efficacy mediated the intervention effect on program adherence whereas no evidence was found for its role as mediator of PA change.
Adding a 15-minute self-efficacy coaching at the start of a lifestyle PA program is a promising strategy to enhance the intervention effects on PA behavior, self-efficacy beliefs, and program adherence. However, the role of self-efficacy as mediator of the intervention effect on in PA was not fully supported.
PubMed ID
23249643 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Jun;98(6):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Source
Can Nurse. 2002 Jun;98(6):4
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Mental health
Nursing Assessment
Notes
Comment On: Can Nurse. 2002 Mar;98(3):8-911928294
PubMed ID
12098854 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking: effect of school and community characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139245
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Chris Y Lovato
Cornelia Zeisser
H Sharon Campbell
Allison W Watts
Peter Halpin
Mary Thompson
John Eyles
Edward Adlaf
K Stephen Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. chris.lovato@ubc.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Organizational Policy
Residence Characteristics
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A substantial challenge in addressing adolescent tobacco use is that smoking behaviors occur in complex environments that involve the school setting and larger community context.
This study provides an integrated description of factors from the school and community environment that affect youth smoking and explains variation in individual smoking behaviors both within and across schools/communities.
Data were collected from 82 randomly sampled secondary schools in five Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, and Labrador) during the 2003-2004 school year. Cross-sectional data were obtained from students; school administrators (school-based tobacco control policies and programs); and from observations in the community. In 2009, hierarchic logistic regression was used to model the role of individual, school, and community variables in predicting student smoking outcomes.
Students who attended a school with a focus on tobacco prevention (OR=0.87, 95% CI=0.81, 0.94) and stronger policies prohibiting tobacco use (OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.88, 0.97) were less likely to smoke than students who attended a school without these characteristics. A student was more likely to smoke if a greater number of students smoked on the school periphery (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.07, 1.47). Within the community, price per cigarette (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.84, 0.99) and immigrants (OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.98, 0.99) were inversely related to students' smoking status.
The results suggest that school and community characteristics account for variation in smoking levels across schools. Based on the current findings, the ideal school setting that supports low student smoking levels is located in a neighborhood where the cost of cigarettes is high, provides tobacco prevention education, and has a policy prohibiting smoking.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):609-1021084083
PubMed ID
21084070 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of a social contract smoking prevention program among children in Qu├ębec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148588
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
S. Kairouz
J. O'Loughlin
J. Laguë
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. skairouz@alcor.concordia.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Competitive Behavior
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Quebec - epidemiology
School Health Services
Self Efficacy
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of a smoke-free class competition in elementary schools in Québec, Canada before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
In a quasiexperimental study design, 843 students in 27 schools exposed to "Mission TNT.06" were compared to 1213 students in 57 matched comparison schools. Baseline data were collected in grade 6 prior to implementation of the program. Follow-up data were collected in grade 7 after students had transitioned to secondary school.
The program improved knowledge about the harmful effects of second-hand smoke, but had no impact on knowledge about the harmful effects of smoking, attitudes about the acceptability of cigarettes, beliefs about the tobacco industry, or self-efficacy to resist peer pressure to smoke. After exposure to the program, intervention students were more likely to misreport their smoking status and to report unfavourable attitudes about classmates who smoke.
Mission TNT.06 may encourage young smokers to misreport their smoking status and to marginalise classmates who smoke. These findings prompted recommendations to conduct more in-depth evaluation of the smoke-free class competition before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
PubMed ID
19748883 View in PubMed
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403 records – page 1 of 41.