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1962 records – page 1 of 197.

Variations in Canadian rates of hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153815
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(4):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Happy doctors? Satisfaction with professional life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169858
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):1079
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-2006
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):1079
Date
Apr-11-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Medicine
Physicians
Specialization
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 Jun 6;174(12):174616754909
PubMed ID
16606952 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impact of information services in a regionalized health-care organization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160319
Source
Health Info Libr J. 2007 Dec;24 Suppl 1:46-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Carolyn Medernach
Joanne Franko
Author Affiliation
SHIPS, Saskatoon Health Region, SK, Canada. carolyn.medernach@saskatoonhealthregion.ca
Source
Health Info Libr J. 2007 Dec;24 Suppl 1:46-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Surveys
Health facilities
Humans
Libraries, Medical - utilization
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Assessment of the usage of medical library services before and after the implementation of several new services, as well as assessment of the clinical impact of the information provided by the medical library.
A sample of employees, residents and physicians were surveyed using a stratified, random selection process in two surveys 4 years apart. The response rate for the first survey was 52% and the response rate for the second survey was 35.2%.
Differences in usage included increased overall use of the librarians and library services, decreased use of the Internet as a source of information, and direct and indirect impacts upon patient care. Information needs of respondents also increased to where 65% of employees and 94% of physicians require information at least once a week. Patient management was the main reason for needing information. The top two specific uses were to find out about a condition and determine a treatment plan.
These findings parallel some of the findings of other researchers, and contradict the findings of others. Possible explanations for these findings and implications for future research are discussed.
PubMed ID
18005294 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2006 Jun 6;174(12):1746
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2006
Author
David B Hogan
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Jun 6;174(12):1746
Date
Jun-6-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Geriatrics
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Stereotyping
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Jul 22;162(14):1577-8412123400
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):107916606952
Comment On: CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):107916606952
PubMed ID
16754909 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1999;5(1):32-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
S B Uldal
Author Affiliation
Department of Telemedicine, University Hospital of Tromsø, Norway. tmasbu@rito.no
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 1999;5(1):32-7
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Norway
Questionnaires
Research
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
To get an overview of Norwegian telemedicine, a questionnaire was sent to the contact persons of telemedicine programmes. There was an 83% response rate from 102 telemedicine programmes; there were 66 active research projects. Several larger networks had recently started operation, probably as a result of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs' plan of action on information and communication technology in health care. Twenty-one programmes involved primary care or home care. Few programmes were using telemedicine to bridge established divisions of service responsibility or to make connections to institutions abroad. There were three large national research programmes in which telemedicine played an important role. Research projects were evaluating the economic, organizational and sociological aspects of telemedicine, as well as the medical. The oldest telemedicine activities were in northern Norway.
PubMed ID
10505367 View in PubMed
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Vaccination coverage of 2-year-old children and immunization practices--Canada, 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210263
Source
Vaccine. 1997 Jan;15(1):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
P. Duclos
Author Affiliation
Division of Immunization, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Vaccine. 1997 Jan;15(1):20-4
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Infant
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess vaccination coverage of 2-year-olds and estimate immunization practices in Canada using a postal survey with a panel of 862 households. RIM weighting was used to provide national estimates. 95% CIs were calculated using the binomial method. Completed questionnaires were received for 534 children born between February 1991 and January 1992. Thirty nine percent of children had received all/most of their vaccinations at a public health clinic. Overall 5.6% parents indicated they had their child immunized because it was mandatory and 7.4% because of requirements for school, pre-school, nursery or day care attendance. A total of 78.7% of parents remembered receiving information on benefits of immunizations and 97% on the risks/side-effects. By their second birthday, 83.7% (95% CI 80.3-86.7) of 2-year-olds had received complete immunization against poliomyelitis; 97.2% (95% CI 95.4-98.4), at least one dose of a measles containing vaccine; 86.5% (95% CI 83.3-89.3), at least one dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine; and 81.6% (95% CI 78.1-84.8), at least, four doses of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine.
PubMed ID
9041662 View in PubMed
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Effect of a monetary incentive on chiropractors' response rate and time to respond to a mail survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183218
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2003 Oct;56(10):1027-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003

CIHI survey: bariatric surgery in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144555
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Janine Arkinson
Hong Ji
Shafagh Fallah
José Pérez
Heather Dawson
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute for Health Information (Toronto office).
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):14-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - methods
Canada
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Abstract
Bariatric surgery is a treatment option for obese patients when weight-reduction strategies such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy fail. To date, bariatric surgery has resulted in sustained weight loss; the resolution of diabetes for some patients has also been observed. The objective of this study was to explore changes in-patient bariatric surgery delivery in Canada between 2004-2005 and 2008-2009.
PubMed ID
20357538 View in PubMed
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Current use of intraosseous infusion in Danish emergency departments: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142476
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Rune Molin
Peter Hallas
Mikkel Brabrand
Thomas Andersen Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Holbaek Sygehus, Holbaek, Denmark. molin@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:37
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Infusions, Intraosseous - utilization
Abstract
Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is recommended when intravenous access cannot be readily established in both pediatric and adult resuscitation. We evaluated the current use of IOI in Danish emergency departments (EDs).
An online questionnaire was e-mailed to the Heads of Department of the twenty EDs currently established in Denmark. The questionnaire focused on the use of IOI in the EDs and included questions on frequency of use, training, equipment and attitudes towards IOI.
We received a total of 19 responses (response rate of 95%). Of the responding 19 Danish EDs 74% (n = 14) reported having intraosseous devices available. The median number of IOI procedures performed in these departments over the preceding 12 months was 5.0 (range: 0-45). In 47% (n = 9) of the departments, prior training sessions in the use of intraosseous devices had not been provided, and 42% (n = 8) did not have local guidelines on IOI. The indication for IOI use was often not clearly defined and only 11% (n = 2) consistently used IOI on relevant indication. This is surprising as 95% (n = 18) of responders were aware that IOI can be utilized in both pediatric and adult resuscitation.
The study shows considerable variations in IOI usage in Danish EDs despite the fact that IOI devices were available in the majority of EDs. In addition, in many EDs there were no local guidelines on IOI and no training in the procedure. We recommend more extensive training of medical staff in IOI techniques in Danish EDs.
Notes
Cites: J Accid Emerg Med. 2000 Jan;17(1):29-3210658988
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 May 31;172(22):1662-620525463
Cites: Eur J Emerg Med. 2009 Dec;16(6):301-419373097
PubMed ID
20594298 View in PubMed
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Health care in Canada 2000: a first annual report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194647
Source
Aust Health Rev. 2001;24(1):116-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
D. Hindle
Author Affiliation
University of New South Wales.
Source
Aust Health Rev. 2001;24(1):116-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Annual Reports as Topic
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
National Health Programs
PubMed ID
11357725 View in PubMed
Less detail

1962 records – page 1 of 197.