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18 records – page 1 of 2.

Abuse: an integrated and coordinated health sector response is needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187512
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
W E Thurston
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonic Diseases, Functional - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Risk factors
Sex Offenses
Notes
Comment On: Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):801-512464974
PubMed ID
12464978 View in PubMed
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Challenges and practices in promoting (ageing) employees working career in the health care sector - case studies from Germany, Finland and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307929
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-29-2019
Author
Sebastian Merkel
Mervi Ruokolainen
Daniel Holman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work and Technology, Westfälische Hochschule, Munscheidstr. 14, 45886, Gelsenkirchen, Germany. merkel@iat.eu.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Date
Nov-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Germany
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - trends
Personnel Turnover - trends
Qualitative Research
Retirement - statistics & numerical data - trends
United Kingdom
Workforce - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
The health and social care sector (HCS) is currently facing multiple challenges across Europe: against the background of ageing societies, more people are in need of care. Simultaneously, several countries report a lack of skilled personnel. Due to its structural characteristics, including a high share of part-time workers, an ageing workforce, and challenging working conditions, the HCS requires measures and strategies to deal with these challenges.
This qualitative study analyses if and how organisations in three countries (Germany, Finland, and the UK) report similar challenges and how they support longer working careers in the HCS. Therefore, we conducted multiple case studies in care organisations. Altogether 54 semi-structured interviews with employees and representatives of management were carried out and analysed thematically.
Analysis of the interviews revealed that there are similar challenges reported across the countries. Multiple organisational measures and strategies to improve the work ability and working life participation of (ageing) workers were identified. We identified similar challenges across our cases but different strategies in responding to them. With respect to the organisational measures, our results showed that the studied organisations did not implement any age-specific management strategies but realised different reactive and proactive human relation measures aiming at maintaining and improving employees' work ability (i.e., health, competence and motivation) and longer working careers.
Organisations within the HCS tend to focus on the recruitment of younger workers and/or migrant workers to address the current lack of skilled personnel. The idea of explicitly focusing on ageing workers and the concept of age management as a possible solution seems to lack awareness and/or popularity among organisations in the sector. The concept of age management offers a broad range of measures, which could be beneficial for both, employees and employers/organisations. Employees could benefit from a better occupational well-being and more meaningful careers, while employers could benefit from more committed employees with enhanced productivity, work ability and possibly a longer career.
PubMed ID
31783852 View in PubMed
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Determinants of integrated health care development: chains of care in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162536
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 2007 Apr-Jun;22(2):145-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bengt Ahgren
Runo Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg, Sweden. bengt.ahgren@bs.se
Source
Int J Health Plann Manage. 2007 Apr-Jun;22(2):145-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Making, Organizational
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Forecasting
Geography
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Local Government
Models, organizational
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Sweden
Abstract
Local health care in Sweden is an emerging form of integrated care, linked together by chains of care. Experiences show, however, that the development of chains of care is making slow progress. In order to study the factors behind this development, an embedded multiple-case study design was chosen. The study compared six health authorities in Sweden, three with successful and three with unsuccessful chain of care development. Three major determinants of integrated health care development were identified: professional dedication, legitimacy and confidence. In more detail, space for prime movers and trust between participants were crucial success factors, while top-down approaches targeting at the same time a change of management systems were negative for the development of chains of care. Resistance from the body of physicians was a serious obstacle to such a development. Local health care depends on developed chains of care, but it seems that health care managers do not have the management systems necessary to run these clinical networks, mainly due to a lack of acceptance from the medical profession. This is an impossible situation in the long run, since the number of chains of care is likely to increase as a result of the emerging local health care.
PubMed ID
17623356 View in PubMed
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Disability management practices in education, hotel/motel, and health care workplaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176177
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 Mar;47(3):217-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Renee M Williams
Muriel G Westmorland
Harry S Shannon
Farah Rasheed
Benjamin C Amick
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. rwilliam@mcmaster.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2005 Mar;47(3):217-26
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Case Management
Chi-Square Distribution
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Health facilities
Human Engineering
Humans
Occupational Health
Ontario
Organizational Policy
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Schools - organization & administration
Wounds and Injuries - rehabilitation
Abstract
The high costs and the impact of work disability have become a growing concern for workplaces. As a result, workplace disability management approaches have been developed to lower disability costs, protect the employability of workers, and promote early return to work.
A stratified random sample of 455 employers in education (n = 157), hotel/motel (n = 110), and health care (n = 188) sectors who completed a mailed Organizational Policies and Practices (OPP) questionnaire is reported. The OPP questionnaire asked questions about eight workplace disability management practices. The article examined the multi-dimensionality, internal consistency, and discriminant validity of the OPP and compares disability management practices across the three sectors.
The OPP questionnaire showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.95) and discriminant validity. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each of the eight subscales demonstrated that there were statistically significant differences between the sectors in ergonomic practices (F (2,452) = 15.8, P
PubMed ID
15712255 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in Canada: examining differing perceptions of stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139854
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2011 Jun;21(2):179-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Karin Maiwald
Angelique de Rijk
Jaime Guzman
Eva Schonstein
Annalee Yassi
Author Affiliation
Care and Public Health Research Institute, Department of Social Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. K.Maiwald@maastrichtuniversity.nl
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2011 Jun;21(2):179-89
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Health Personnel
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Research Personnel
Sick Leave
Workplace
Abstract
INTRODUCTION Workplace disability prevention is important, but stakeholders can differ in their appreciation of such interventions. We present a responsive evaluation of a workplace disability prevention intervention in a Canadian healthcare organization. Three groups of stakeholders were included: designers of the intervention, deliverers, and workers. The aim was to examine the appreciation of this intervention by analyzing the discrepancies with respect to what these various stakeholders see as the causes of work disability, what the intervention should aim at to address this problem, and to what extent the intervention works in practice. METHODS A qualitative research method was used, including data-triangulation: (a) documentary materials; (b) semi-structured interviews with the deliverers and workers (n = 14); (c) participatory observations of group meetings (n = 6); (d) member-checking meetings (n = 3); (e) focus-group meetings (n = 2). A grounded theory approach, including some ethnographic methodology, was used for the data-analysis. RESULTS Stakeholders' perceptions of causes for work disability differ, as do preferred strategies for prevention. Designers proposed work-directed measures to change the workplace and work organizations, and individual-directed measures to change workers' behaviour. Deliverers targeted individual-directed measures, however, workers were mostly seeking work-directed measures. To assess how the intervention was working, designers sought a wide range of outcome measures. Deliverers focused on measurable outcomes targeted at reducing work time-loss. Workers perceived that this intervention offered short-term benefits yet fell short in ensuring sustainable return-to-work. CONCLUSION This study provides understanding of where discrepancies between stakeholders' perceptions about interventions come from. Our findings have implications for workplace disability prevention intervention development, implementation and evaluation criteria.
Notes
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Cites: J Occup Rehabil. 2010 Mar;20(1):41-819826930
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Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2003 Dec;57(11):2101-1414512241
Cites: Work. 2004;23(1):31-4115328461
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Cites: Sociol Health Illn. 2007 May;29(4):497-51417498165
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2007 Oct;17(8):1103-1617928482
Cites: Health Care Anal. 2008 Jun;16(2):114-2618449805
Cites: Work. 2008;30(3):229-3918525147
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(2):CD00695519370664
Cites: J Occup Rehabil. 2009 Sep;19(3):264-7319488838
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2001 Oct;28(5):591-60711575688
PubMed ID
20972703 View in PubMed
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Facilitating health and education sector collaboration in support of comprehensive school health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138848
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101 Suppl 2:S18-9
Publication Type
Article
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jul-Aug;101 Suppl 2:S18-9
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Cooperative Behavior
Government Agencies
Health Care Sector - organization & administration - standards
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
School Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Comprehensive school health (CSH) is embraced internationally as the most effective way of promoting the health of students and the school community. It is a framework for supporting improvements in students' educational outcomes while addressing their well-being in a planned, holistic way. While many successful CSH initiatives are brought about by passionate individuals at the grassroots level, these initiatives benefit greatly from effective cross-sector collaborations within and among governments to coordinate policy and funding from the health and education sectors. Governments represent just one group of professionals within the myriad of players involved in implementing CSH in Canada. To be effective contributors to the model, all levels of government need to work together to reduce duplication while at the same time minimizing gaps in the policies and practices that support school health promotion. Collaboration between the health and education sectors within and across governmental boundaries is proving to be an effective mechanism for achieving this. In its first five-year mandate, the Pan Canadian Joint Consortium for School Health has broken new ground in horizontal integration and, as a result, has identified a set of key factors necessary for successful cross-sector collaboration.
PubMed ID
21133197 View in PubMed
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The impact of market oriented reforms on choice and information: a case study of cataract surgery in outer London and Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72363
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 May;48(10):1415-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M. Fotaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Policy and Administration, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, UK. m.fotaki@lse.ac.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 May;48(10):1415-32
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cataract Extraction - economics - standards
Comparative Study
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Economic Competition
Female
Health Care Reform
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
London
Male
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Advocacy
Patient satisfaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sweden
Abstract
In the early 1990s, a set of market-oriented reforms was introduced into health care systems of the UK and Sweden, two exemplary cases of reliance on planned budgeting and integrated provision of services. In the pursuit of increased efficiency, several County Councils in Sweden have followed the public competition model, while in the UK internal market reforms were introduced. It was expected that the separation of functions of planners and purchasers from those of providers, which were to be freely chosen by the former, would achieve higher allocative efficiency but also enhance users' satisfaction with care. This paper uses cataract surgery as a case study to trace the impact of competition among providers on choice and information. Qualitative research methods were employed to record the perception of changes in their type and amount as it was given to both purchasers and patients. A set of open ended and standardised questionnaires was designed to elicit the views of all actors involved and to measure the likely transformations. Four study sites from Outer London were selected representing the diversity of responses, and the only existing large provider of eye services to Stockholm County Council was used. The analysis of the data showed that the quasi-market reforms have resulted in a change of attitude of providers. Some improvements in the amount and type of information given to purchasers and patients could also be detected, although as far as direct users were concerned, the demand has not been fully satisfied. However, the impact on choice available to patients and purchasers alike seemed to be adverse, an effect that was particularly strong in the UK case.
PubMed ID
10369441 View in PubMed
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The implementation of business process reengineering in American and Canadian hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201874
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1999;24(2):19-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
S J Ho
L. Chan
R E Kidwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Accounting, College of Business, Niagara University, NY, USA.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1999;24(2):19-31
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Commerce - organization & administration
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Affiliation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
This study of more than 215 U.S. and Canadian hospital executives indicates that improved service quality to patients and enhanced financial performance are the driving forces for hospitals that undertake business process reengineering (BPR) activities. Despite reporting moderate success in achieving organizational objectives through BPR, these executives identified lack of staff cooperation, buy-in, and skill as important factors that derail BPR implementation efforts.
PubMed ID
10358804 View in PubMed
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[Industrial production of the LDRD "Siberia-N" digital radiographic devices]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69325
Source
Med Tekh. 2004 Jan-Feb;(1):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S E Baru
Iu G Ukraintsev
Source
Med Tekh. 2004 Jan-Feb;(1):38-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Fluoroscopy - instrumentation - utilization
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Mass Chest X-Ray - instrumentation - utilization
Siberia
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - radiography
Abstract
It is envisaged, as a key task, in the Federal Program on Tuberculosis Monitoring, that preventive measures and early TB detection is a priority. Fluorography, which is important for the recognition of pulmonary tuberculosis at its early stages, has been used in the diagnostics of pulmonary pathologies. However, according to the statistics provided by the Russian Ministry of Healthcare, around 80% of available medical equipment is now worn and obsolete. Owing to a fruitful research activity related with designing a digital low-dose X-Ray unit (Siberia-N) carried out by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Novosibirsk), a certain progress can be stated in perfecting the fluorography equipment in Russia. The above unit incorporates all advanced achievements in the field of digital X-Ray diagnostics.
PubMed ID
15080006 View in PubMed
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Internal market systems in Sweden: seven years after the Stockholm model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192105
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):380-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
R K Quaye
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691, USA. rquaye@acs.wooster.edu
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):380-5
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Choice Behavior
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Family Practice - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Hospital Administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Satisfaction
Models, organizational
Physician's Role
Politics
Privatization
Reimbursement, Incentive
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden, like other European countries in the 1990s introduced internal market reforms in the delivery of health care. Specifically, in Stockholm county, the Stockholm model was introduced to strengthen the position of patients in their choice of care. Other reform measures introduced included the family doctor's legislation, care guarantee and the adel reform. This paper reports interviews with Swedish physicians, politicians and health economists seven years after the introduction of these reforms. The broader goals of this paper are to explore the extent to which these changes have overtime affected the views of physicians as they reflect on their working conditions and experiences with the use of the diagnostic-related groups (DRG) system.
Data was obtained from in-depth interviews of 15 primary care physicians, 4 heads of hospital departments (surgery), 5 county council members and 4 health economists (N = 28). A content analysis was performed on major themes on the interview transcripts.
The majority of our respondents reported that the financial incentives introduced through performance-based reimbursements do exist in Stockholm county and that productivity and efficiency have increased over the period of investigation. Primary physicians voiced support for the privatization process in health care delivery. Most physicians reported that they were generally satisfied with their work. Over half of the general physicians complained about their working conditions but felt they have a unique way to play as 'gatekeepers' in the overall Swedish health care delivery system.
Our findings suggest that physicians are generally satisfied with their working conditions. Over 90% of our respondents support the use of a diagnostic-related group. What is clear though is that the primary care physician's role due to its potential benefit as an agent of cost control is important, but it is not clear that the primary care physicians have made a major contribution to the Swedish health care delivery system as they should be.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Public Health. 2003 Mar;13(1):90-1; author reply 9112678323
PubMed ID
11766477 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.