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An integrative discourse perspective on positive leadership in public health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289955
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2017 Feb 06; 30(1):44-58
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-06-2017
Author
Ville Pietiläinen
Ilkka Salmi
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland , Rovaniemi, Finland.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2017 Feb 06; 30(1):44-58
Date
Feb-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Care Sector
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Professional Role
Public Health Administration
Abstract
Purpose This study aims to take a discursive view on positive leadership (PL). A positive approach has gained momentum in recent years as appropriate leadership practices are implemented in organizations. Despite the turn toward discursive approaches in organization studies, there is insufficient evidence supporting PL as a socially constructed experience. Design/methodology/approach The present study addresses an integrative discourse perspective for capturing the PL concept as a social process within the public health-care context. Findings Four meanings of PL are highlighted: role-taking, servicing, balancing and deciphering. Research limitations/implications The meanings shift the emphasis of certain PL definitions to a contextual interpretation. For scholars, the perspective demonstrates a multidimensional process approach in the desired organizational context as a counterbalance to one unanimously agreed-upon PL definition. Practical implications For leaders, an integrative discourse perspective offers tools for comprehending PL as a process: how to identify, negotiate and reconcile various PL meanings. Originality/value An integrative discourse perspective provides a novel perspective capturing the PL concept within the public health-care field.
PubMed ID
28128049 View in PubMed
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Health care reform in Russia: a survey of head doctors and insurance administrators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187943
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Dec;55(12):2253-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Judyth L Twigg
Author Affiliation
Department of Political Science and Public Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University, Box 842028, 923 West Franklin Street, Richmond, VA 23284-2028, USA. jtwigg@vcu.edu
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Dec;55(12):2253-65
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Data Collection
Economic Competition
Health Care Reform - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Sector
Humans
Middle Aged
Organizational Innovation
Physician Executives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Russia
Social Change
State Medicine - organization & administration
Abstract
In keeping with the introduction of market-oriented reforms since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia's health care system has undergone a series of sweeping changes since 1992. These reforms, intended to overhaul socialized methods of health care financing and delivery and to replace them with a structure of competitive incentives to improve efficiency and quality of care, have met with mixed levels of implementation and results. This article probes some of the sources of support for and resistance to change in Russia's system of health care financing and delivery. It does so through a national survey of two key groups of participants in that system: head doctors in Russian clinics and hospitals, and the heads of the regional-level quasi-governmental medical insurance Funds. The survey results demonstrate that, on the whole, both head doctors and health insurance Fund directors claim to support the recent health care system reforms, although the latter's support is consistently statistically significantly stronger than that of the former. In addition, the insurance Fund directors' responses to the survey questions tend consistently to fall in the shape of a standard bell curve around the average responses, with a small number of respondents more in agreement with the survey statements than average, and a similarly small number of respondents less so. By contrast, the head doctors, along a wide variety of reform measures, split into two camps: one that strongly favors the marketization of health care, and one that would prefer a return to Soviet-style socialized medicine. The survey results show remarkable national consistency, with no variance according to the respondents' geographic location, regional population levels or other demographic or health characteristics, age of respondents, or size of health facility represented. These findings demonstrate the emergence of well-defined bureaucratic and political constituencies, their composition mixed depending on the particular element of reform under discussion, for and against specific avenues of continuity and change in Russia's health policy. As Russia struggles to devise policy strategies and tactics that balance access, equity, quality, and efficiency, it confronts not only policy choices but also political challenges that look not dissimilar to those faced by health reformers elsewhere in the world.
PubMed ID
12409138 View in PubMed
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Internal market systems in Sweden: seven years after the Stockholm model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192105
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):380-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
R K Quaye
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio 44691, USA. rquaye@acs.wooster.edu
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):380-5
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Choice Behavior
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Family Practice - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Hospital Administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Satisfaction
Models, organizational
Physician's Role
Politics
Privatization
Reimbursement, Incentive
State Medicine
Sweden
Abstract
Sweden, like other European countries in the 1990s introduced internal market reforms in the delivery of health care. Specifically, in Stockholm county, the Stockholm model was introduced to strengthen the position of patients in their choice of care. Other reform measures introduced included the family doctor's legislation, care guarantee and the adel reform. This paper reports interviews with Swedish physicians, politicians and health economists seven years after the introduction of these reforms. The broader goals of this paper are to explore the extent to which these changes have overtime affected the views of physicians as they reflect on their working conditions and experiences with the use of the diagnostic-related groups (DRG) system.
Data was obtained from in-depth interviews of 15 primary care physicians, 4 heads of hospital departments (surgery), 5 county council members and 4 health economists (N = 28). A content analysis was performed on major themes on the interview transcripts.
The majority of our respondents reported that the financial incentives introduced through performance-based reimbursements do exist in Stockholm county and that productivity and efficiency have increased over the period of investigation. Primary physicians voiced support for the privatization process in health care delivery. Most physicians reported that they were generally satisfied with their work. Over half of the general physicians complained about their working conditions but felt they have a unique way to play as 'gatekeepers' in the overall Swedish health care delivery system.
Our findings suggest that physicians are generally satisfied with their working conditions. Over 90% of our respondents support the use of a diagnostic-related group. What is clear though is that the primary care physician's role due to its potential benefit as an agent of cost control is important, but it is not clear that the primary care physicians have made a major contribution to the Swedish health care delivery system as they should be.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Public Health. 2003 Mar;13(1):90-1; author reply 9112678323
PubMed ID
11766477 View in PubMed
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Legal and regulatory education and training needs in the healthcare industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171680
Source
JONAS Healthc Law Ethics Regul. 2005 Oct-Dec;7(4):114-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steve W Henson
Debra Burke
Stephen M Crow
Sandra J Hartman
Author Affiliation
Department of Marketing and Business Law, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC 28723, USA. shenson@email.wcu.edu
Source
JONAS Healthc Law Ethics Regul. 2005 Oct-Dec;7(4):114-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antitrust Laws - ethics
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Criminal Law - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Education, Continuing - standards
Employment - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Facility Regulation and Control - ethics - organization & administration
Health Care Sector - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Facility Administrators - education - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Liability, Legal
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Professional Competence - standards
Professional Role
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
As in any other industry, laws and regulations significantly impact the functioning of the healthcare industry. Some laws, such as those relating to malpractice and social insurance systems, affect the manner in which the industry operates. Other laws, such as those regulating antitrust and employment practices, affect the organization and the environment in which the industry operates. It is increasingly important that practitioners and managers be cognizant of this complex and dynamic legal minefield. This study examined healthcare managers and executives' knowledge of 9 key issues in the legal and regulatory environment of the healthcare industry. Specifically, the study focused on knowledge concerning tort and contract liability, insurance law, labor and employment regulation, criminal and ethical responsibility, antitrust regulation, the law governing business associations and recent developments. Findings suggest that the levels of knowledge required to manage legal and regulatory issues are much greater than the existing levels of knowledge.
PubMed ID
16331074 View in PubMed
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Mental health promotion competencies in the health sector in Finland: a qualitative study of the views of professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299224
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):115-120
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Nina Tamminen
Pia Solin
Eija Stengård
Lasse Kannas
Tarja Kettunen
Author Affiliation
1 WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Promotion, Prevention and Policy, Mental Health unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Mar; 47(2):115-120
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Care Sector
Health Personnel - psychology
Health promotion
Humans
Mental health
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to investigate what competencies are needed for mental health promotion in health sector practice in Finland.
A qualitative study was carried out to seek the views of mental health professionals regarding mental health promotion-related competencies. The data were collected via two focus groups and a questionnaire survey of professionals working in the health sector in Finland. The focus groups consisted of a total of 13 professionals. Further, 20 questionnaires were received from the questionnaire survey. The data were analysed using the qualitative data analysis software ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin. A content analysis was carried out.
In total, 23 competencies were identified and clustered under the categories of theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and personal attitudes and values. In order to promote mental health, it is necessary to have a knowledge of the principles and concepts of mental health promotion, including methods and tools for effective practices. Furthermore, a variety of skills-based competencies such as communication and collaboration skills were described. Personal attitudes and values included a holistic approach and respect for human rights, among others.
The study provides new information on what competencies are needed to plan, implement and evaluate mental health promotion in health sector practice, with the aim of contributing to a more effective workforce. The competencies provide aid in planning training programmes and qualifications, as well as job descriptions and roles in health sector workplaces related to mental health promotion.
PubMed ID
28699393 View in PubMed
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Teachers' experiences of English-language-taught degree programs within health care sector of Finnish polytechnics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139126
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2011 Aug;31(6):553-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Marianne Pitkajarvi
Elina Eriksson
Pertti Kekki
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Faculty of Medicine, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Korpimaa 6 b 11, 02300 Espoo, Finland. mzpitkaj@mappi.helsinki.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2011 Aug;31(6):553-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Care Sector
Humans
Language
Nursing Evaluation Research
Qualitative Research
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to research teachers' experiences of the English-Language-Taught Degree Programs in the health care sector of Finnish polytechnics. More specifically, the focus was on teachers' experiences of teaching methods and clinical practice. The data were collected from eighteen teachers in six polytechnics through focus group interviews. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The results suggested that despite the positive interaction between students and teachers, choosing appropriate teaching methods provided a challenge for teachers, due to cultural diversity of students as well as to the use of a foreign language in tuition. Due to students' language-related difficulties, clinical practice was found to be the biggest challenge in the educational process. Staffs' attitudes were perceived to be significant for students' clinical experience. Further research using stronger designs is needed.
PubMed ID
21095046 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.