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Abuse: an integrated and coordinated health sector response is needed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187512
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
W E Thurston
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):815-6
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colonic Diseases, Functional - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Risk factors
Sex Offenses
Notes
Comment On: Can J Gastroenterol. 2002 Nov;16(11):801-512464974
PubMed ID
12464978 View in PubMed
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An integrative discourse perspective on positive leadership in public health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289955
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2017 Feb 06; 30(1):44-58
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-06-2017
Author
Ville Pietiläinen
Ilkka Salmi
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Lapland , Rovaniemi, Finland.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl). 2017 Feb 06; 30(1):44-58
Date
Feb-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Health Care Sector
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Professional Role
Public Health Administration
Abstract
Purpose This study aims to take a discursive view on positive leadership (PL). A positive approach has gained momentum in recent years as appropriate leadership practices are implemented in organizations. Despite the turn toward discursive approaches in organization studies, there is insufficient evidence supporting PL as a socially constructed experience. Design/methodology/approach The present study addresses an integrative discourse perspective for capturing the PL concept as a social process within the public health-care context. Findings Four meanings of PL are highlighted: role-taking, servicing, balancing and deciphering. Research limitations/implications The meanings shift the emphasis of certain PL definitions to a contextual interpretation. For scholars, the perspective demonstrates a multidimensional process approach in the desired organizational context as a counterbalance to one unanimously agreed-upon PL definition. Practical implications For leaders, an integrative discourse perspective offers tools for comprehending PL as a process: how to identify, negotiate and reconcile various PL meanings. Originality/value An integrative discourse perspective provides a novel perspective capturing the PL concept within the public health-care field.
PubMed ID
28128049 View in PubMed
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Applications of economic models in healthcare: the introduction of pioglitazone in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47539
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 1:43-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Freddie Henriksson
Author Affiliation
Stockholm School of Economics and Stockholm Health Economics Consulting AB, Stockholm, Sweden. Freddie.Henriksson@hhs.se
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2002;20 Suppl 1:43-53
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Economics, Pharmaceutical
Health Care Sector - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Models, Economic
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Thiazoles - economics - therapeutic use
Thiazolidinediones
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a common disorder that is estimated to affect approximately 100 million people worldwide. Forecasts have suggested a substantial increase in incidence, mainly in Asia, Africa and North America. Thus, an increasing number of people with diabetes-related complications will have to be cared for in the future. This development will be a major health problem for the people affected, as well as a major health economic challenge for many countries. Thiazolidinediones represent a new class of drugs with a novel mechanism of action that addresses the root cause of T2DM. Their mode of action targets the core defect of T2DM, namely, insulin resistance. One of these drugs, pioglitazone, was recently approved by the Swedish authorities. To evaluate the cost effectiveness of this new drug, a published mathematical simulation model was used. This model was adapted to Swedish conditions, and local Swedish unit costs were put into the model. Modelling is necessary when performing economic evaluations in diabetes because of the complexity of the disease and its long time horizon. The cost-effectiveness analyses showed that the cost per life-year gained with pioglitazone combination therapy compared with current treatment ranged from 37,000 Swedish kronor (SEK) to SEK149,000. Although there is no threshold value for cost effectiveness in Sweden, the values presented would normally be regarded as cost effective in the Swedish healthcare system. Modelling studies are a good starting point, but long-term naturalistic studies are needed to establish the cost effectiveness of these new drugs.
PubMed ID
12036383 View in PubMed
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[Are fitness centres part of the health care sector?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92234
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Sep 1;170(36):2790-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2008
Author
Stidsen Laerke
Jensen Jan
Kvorning Thue
Hartvigsen Jan
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universitet, Institut for Idraet, Odense M.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Sep 1;170(36):2790-4
Date
Sep-1-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Female
Fitness Centers
Health Care Sector
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - rehabilitation - therapy
Questionnaires
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Disease in the musculoskeletal system accounts for the largest proportion of chronic disease in Denmark, and the associated costs amount to billions of kroner every year. Prevention and treatment have focussed on exercise and training. Training in fitness centres is one of the most popular forms of exercise in Denmark and the number of users is increasing rapidly. We suspect that musculoskeletal problems are common among members of fitness centres, and that good communication between the centres and the health care sector would optimize treatment. The purpose of the present study is to describe the extent of musculoskeletal problems among members of fitness centres and the degree of communication between the centres and the health care sector. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Information regarding age, sex, musculoskeletal complaints, possible treatment, and whether there had been any communication between health care providers and the fitness centres before or during the period of training was collected among members of five fitness centres in Denmark. RESULTS: 485 (94%) out of a total of 516 members participated in the study. 56% reported that they had one or more musculoskeletal problem when joining the centre. Out of these, 77% stated that musculoskeletal problems were the main or a contributing reason for joining the centre. More than half the participants with musculoskeletal complaints had received some kind of treatment within the previous year. However, communication between health care providers and fitness centres was uncommon. CONCLUSION: The fitness sector is growing rapidly and more than 50% of members suffer from musculoskeletal problems. Most of these also receive treatment for their problems but there is very little and almost no formal communication between the health care sector and the fitness centres.
PubMed ID
18761875 View in PubMed
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Carbon footprint of telemedicine solutions--unexplored opportunity for reducing carbon emissions in the health sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262422
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Asa Holmner
Kristie L Ebi
Lutfan Lazuardi
Maria Nilsson
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Footprint - economics - statistics & numerical data
Climate Change - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Health Care Sector - economics
Hospitals, University
Humans
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics
Travel - economics
Videoconferencing - economics
Abstract
The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers.
To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector.
A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases.
Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40-70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car.
Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints.
Notes
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Aug;75(8):565-7616298545
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2007;13(6):303-917785027
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(6):427-4718720118
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2009;15(3):137-819364897
Cites: Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz. 2009 Mar;52(3):270-819259634
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 2009 Dec;34(6):1011-3420018989
Cites: N S W Public Health Bull. 2009 Nov-Dec;20(11-12):173-620132739
Cites: Telemed J E Health. 2010 Mar;16(2):229-3220156125
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2010;16(4):215-2020511579
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2011;17(1):1-621097560
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:18521824388
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2012 Jan;18(1):1-622101609
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2012 Mar 6;46(5):2557-6322283799
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2012;5. doi: 10.3402/gha.v5i0.1842822679398
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:3323360332
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2013 Mar;82(3):141-5823332922
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2013 Apr 4;368(14):1335-4323550671
Cites: Telemed J E Health. 2013 Jun;19(6):444-5423697504
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Apr 5;383(9924):1185-924703554
PubMed ID
25188322 View in PubMed
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Challenges and practices in promoting (ageing) employees working career in the health care sector - case studies from Germany, Finland and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307929
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-29-2019
Author
Sebastian Merkel
Mervi Ruokolainen
Daniel Holman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work and Technology, Westfälische Hochschule, Munscheidstr. 14, 45886, Gelsenkirchen, Germany. merkel@iat.eu.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Date
Nov-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Germany
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - trends
Personnel Turnover - trends
Qualitative Research
Retirement - statistics & numerical data - trends
United Kingdom
Workforce - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
The health and social care sector (HCS) is currently facing multiple challenges across Europe: against the background of ageing societies, more people are in need of care. Simultaneously, several countries report a lack of skilled personnel. Due to its structural characteristics, including a high share of part-time workers, an ageing workforce, and challenging working conditions, the HCS requires measures and strategies to deal with these challenges.
This qualitative study analyses if and how organisations in three countries (Germany, Finland, and the UK) report similar challenges and how they support longer working careers in the HCS. Therefore, we conducted multiple case studies in care organisations. Altogether 54 semi-structured interviews with employees and representatives of management were carried out and analysed thematically.
Analysis of the interviews revealed that there are similar challenges reported across the countries. Multiple organisational measures and strategies to improve the work ability and working life participation of (ageing) workers were identified. We identified similar challenges across our cases but different strategies in responding to them. With respect to the organisational measures, our results showed that the studied organisations did not implement any age-specific management strategies but realised different reactive and proactive human relation measures aiming at maintaining and improving employees' work ability (i.e., health, competence and motivation) and longer working careers.
Organisations within the HCS tend to focus on the recruitment of younger workers and/or migrant workers to address the current lack of skilled personnel. The idea of explicitly focusing on ageing workers and the concept of age management as a possible solution seems to lack awareness and/or popularity among organisations in the sector. The concept of age management offers a broad range of measures, which could be beneficial for both, employees and employers/organisations. Employees could benefit from a better occupational well-being and more meaningful careers, while employers could benefit from more committed employees with enhanced productivity, work ability and possibly a longer career.
PubMed ID
31783852 View in PubMed
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Characterizing violence in health care in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150574
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Rakel N Kling
Annalee Yassi
Elizabeth Smailes
Chris Y Lovato
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. rkling@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Sector - statistics & numerical data
Health Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk Management - statistics & numerical data
Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The high rate of violence in the healthcare sector supports the need for greater surveillance efforts.
The purpose of this study was to use a province-wide workplace incident reporting system to calculate rates and identify risk factors for violence in the British Columbia healthcare industry by occupational groups, including nursing.
Data were extracted for a 1-year period (2004-2005) from the Workplace Health Indicator Tracking and Evaluation database for all employee reports of violence incidents for four of the six British Columbia health authorities. Risk factors for violence were identified through comparisons of incident rates (number of incidents/100,000 worked hours) by work characteristics, including nursing occupations and work units, and by regression models adjusted for demographic factors.
Across health authorities, three groups at particularly high risk for violence were identified: very small healthcare facilities [rate ratios (RR) = 6.58, 95% CI =3.49, 12.41], the care aide occupation (RR = 10.05, 95% CI = 6.72, 15.05), and paediatric departments in acute care hospitals (RR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.05, 4.67).
The three high-risk groups warrant targeted prevention or intervention efforts be implemented. The identification of high-risk groups supports the importance of a province-wide surveillance system for public health planning.
PubMed ID
19493143 View in PubMed
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Circle of healing: traditional storytelling, part one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187205
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
LouAnn Benson
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):9-13
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology - education - history
Complementary Therapies - history
Delivery of Health Care - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
Foundations - history
Health Care Sector - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Medicine, Traditional - history
Abstract
The session began with three presenters - LouAnn Benson, Walter Porter, and Lisa Dolchok - all of whom are or have been affiliated with the Circle of Healing Program at Southcentral Foundation in Anchorage, Alaska. The Southcentral Foundation is a Native Health Corporation that administers what used to be the Indian Health Service Hospital and Medical Center. In the Circle of Healing Program, the Southcentral Foundation has designed and implemented an approach to health care that allows its patients simultaneously to access Western medicine, traditional Native healing, and other alternative approaches to health care, such as acupuncture. An important figure in this effort is Dr. Robert Morgan, a psychologist who has worked with the program for several years, and who helped suggest presenters for this part of the program. Originally, Bob planned to be present in Quebec City, but family priorities meant a change in plans. Bob's absence had a silver lining, however, because in his stead he sent LouAnn Benson, one of his able colleagues, who talked about the program from the perspective of an insider.
PubMed ID
21755638 View in PubMed
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Clinical laboratory test menu changes in the Pacific Northwest: 1994 to 1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205914
Source
Clin Chem. 1998 Apr;44(4):833-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
K M LaBeau
M. Simon
S J Steindel
Author Affiliation
Office of Laboratory Quality Assurance, Washington State Department of Health, Seattle 98155, USA.
Source
Clin Chem. 1998 Apr;44(4):833-8
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Family Practice - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Sector
Humans
Idaho
Laboratories - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Oregon
Physicians' Offices
Questionnaires
Washington
Abstract
Laboratory testing services are presently undergoing dynamic changes in response to a wide range of external factors. Government regulations, reimbursement, and managed care are only a few of the influences affecting the availability of testing services and on-site testing capabilities in hospital, independent, and physician office laboratories. Medical practice changes, marketplace influences, test technologies, and costs also play a role in determining where testing is being performed. To better understand the factors influencing clinical laboratory test volumes and menus and to identify on-site testing deemed essential in physician office laboratories, we gathered information from a network of clinical laboratories in the Pacific Northwest. Questionnaires were sent to 257 Laboratory Medicine Sentinel Monitoring Network participants in March 1996. In the past 2 years, changes in on-site test volumes and test menus have been primarily due to medical practice changes and marketplace influences. When laboratories had a decrease in test volumes or test menu choices, the size of the patient workload and the volumes of test orders have had the greatest impact. Laboratory regulations and managed care contracts have played a role in shifting on-site testing to outside sources; however, these factors did not appear to be primary influences. Only 5% of physician office laboratories identified tests that they believed were essential for optimal patient care but did not perform on-site.
PubMed ID
9554496 View in PubMed
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120 records – page 1 of 12.