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Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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Alcohol advice in primary health care--is it a wise use of resources?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10882
Source
Health Policy. 1998 Jul;45(1):47-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
L. Lindholm
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. Lars.Lindholm@epih.umu.se
Source
Health Policy. 1998 Jul;45(1):47-56
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - mortality - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - economics
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Many attempts to calculate costs caused by the use of alcohol in accordance with the cost-of-illness method have been reported in the literature. However, in a decision-making perspective and with a focus on what possible interventions to undertake, cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness studies are more useful. In this study the cost-effectiveness of advice aimed at reducing 'heavy' drinking to 'moderate' drinking is calculated. Results from controlled trials, showing the short-range effects of advice, are combined with observations from long-term epidemiological studies showing the association between alcohol consumption and total mortality. This study shows that advice from primary health care staff has a potential to be a very cost-effective means of intervention. The crucial point seems to be the number of people that makes durable changes in consumption. If about 1% make lasting changes a brief intervention is relatively cost-effective (20,000 ECU/YLS), and if about 10% change resources will be saved in health care. Important effects such as increased quality of life and decreasing production losses are not taken into account.
PubMed ID
10183012 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards priority-setting and rationing in healthcare -- an exploratory survey of Swedish medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90452
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):122-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Omar Faisal
Tinghög Gustav
Tinghög Petter
Carlsson Per
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. faisal.omar@liu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):122-30
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Education, Medical
Female
Health Care Rationing - economics - ethics
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities - economics - ethics
Humans
Male
Primary Health Care - economics - ethics
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Healthcare priority-setting is inextricably linked to the challenge of providing publicly funded healthcare within a limited budget, which may result in difficult and potentially controversial rationing decisions. Despite priority-setting's increasing prominence in policy and academic discussion, it is still unclear what the level of understanding and acceptance of priority-setting is at different levels of health care. AIMS: The aim of this study is threefold. First we wish to explore the level of familiarity with different aspects of priority-setting among graduating medical students. Secondly, to gauge their acceptance of both established and proposed Swedish priority-setting principles. Finally to elucidate their attitudes towards healthcare rationing and the role of different actors in decision making, with a particular interest in comparing the attitudes of medical students with data from the literature examining the attitudes among primary care patients in Sweden. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey containing 14 multiple choice items about priority-setting in healthcare was distributed to the graduating medical class at Linkoöping University. The response rate was 92% (43/47). RESULTS: Less than half of respondents have encountered the notion of open priority-setting, and the majority believed it to be somewhat or very unclear. There is a high degree of awareness and agreement with the established ethical principles for priority-setting in Swedish health care; however respondents are inconsistent in their application of the cost-effectiveness principle. A larger proportion of respondents were more favourable to physicians and other health personnel being responsible for rationing decisions as opposed to politicians. CONCLUSIONS: Future discussion about priority-setting in medical education should be contextualized within an explicit and open process. There is a need to adequately clarify the role of the cost-effectiveness principle in priority-setting. Medical students seem to acknowledge the need for rationing in healthcare to a greater extent when compared with previous results from Swedish primary care patients.
PubMed ID
19141543 View in PubMed
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Bedside rationing by general practitioners: a postal survey in the Danish public healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91926
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:192
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lauridsen Sigurd M R
Norup Michael
Rossel Peter
Author Affiliation
Unit of Medical Philosophy and Clinical Theory, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark. s.lauridsen@medphil.ku.dk
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:192
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Denmark
Ethics, Clinical
Female
Health Care Costs
Health care rationing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - drug therapy
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is ethically controversial whether medical doctors are morally permitted to ration the care of their patients at the bedside. To explore whether general practitioners in fact do ration in this manner we conducted a study within primary care in the Danish public healthcare system. The purpose of the study was to measure the extent to which general practitioners (GPs) would be willing to factor in cost-quality trade-offs when prescribing medicine, and to discover whether, and if so to what extent, they believe that patients should be informed about this. METHODS: Postal survey of 600 randomly selected Danish GPs, of which 330 responded to the questionnaire. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 14.0) was used to produce general descriptive statistics. Significance was calculated with the McNemar and the chi-square test. The main outcome measures of the study were twofold: an assessment of the proportion of GPs who, in a mainly hypothetical setting, would consider cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given their economic impact on the healthcare system; and a measure of the extent to which they would disclose this information to patients. RESULTS: In the hypothetical setting 95% of GPs considered cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given the economic impact of such trade-offs on the healthcare system. In all 90% stated that this consideration had been relevant in clinical decision-making within the last month. In the hypothetical setting 55% would inform their patients that they considered a cost-quality trade-off relevant to their clinical decisions given the economic impact of such trade-offs on the healthcare system. The most common reason (68%) given for not wanting to inform patients about this matter was the belief that the information would not prove useful to patients. In the hypothetical setting cost-quality trade-offs were considered relevant significantly more often in connection with concerns about costs to the patient (86%) than they were in connection with concerns about costs to the healthcare system (55%; p
PubMed ID
18808694 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Surg. 2000 Aug;43(4):244-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J L Meakins
Source
Can J Surg. 2000 Aug;43(4):244-6
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Budgets
Canada
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Humans
National Health Programs - economics
Surgical Procedures, Elective - economics
Notes
Comment In: Can J Surg. 2000 Dec;43(6):404-511129823
Comment In: Can J Surg. 2000 Oct;43(5):39011045101
Comment On: Can J Surg. 2000 Jun;43(3):164-510851404
PubMed ID
10948678 View in PubMed
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Child psychiatry and early intervention: I. The aggregate burden of suffering.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223832
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):230-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
J H Beitchman
A. Inglis
D. Schachter
Author Affiliation
Child and Family Studies Centre, Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1992 May;37(4):230-3
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - economics
Cost Control - trends
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Priorities - economics
Health Resources - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - economics - psychology
United States
Abstract
This paper discusses the need to estimate the costs of an illness to properly allocate intervention resources for the various psychiatric disorders of childhood. Disorders that require the most community resources should be given the highest priority for early intervention programs. Factors to consider for estimating disorders which are most costly are discussed here: the incidence of the disorder, its severity, whether it is episodic or stable, and its impact on the individual family and the community. These factors contribute to the aggregate burden of suffering caused by a disorder.
PubMed ID
1611583 View in PubMed
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Coping with obligations towards patient and society: an empirical study of attitudes and practice among Norwegian physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73030
Source
J Med Ethics. 1995 Jun;21(3):158-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
T. Arnesen
S. Fredriksen
Author Affiliation
Autonama University, Madrid.
Source
J Med Ethics. 1995 Jun;21(3):158-61
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Conflict of Interest
Female
Health Care Rationing - economics - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moral Obligations
Norway
Patient Advocacy
Patient Selection
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Resource Allocation
Social Responsibility
Abstract
A questionnaire relating to attitudes towards setting economic priorities within the health care system was sent to all 151 general practitioners in Northern Norway. Of these, 109 (72 per cent) responded. Ninety-six per cent of the respondents agreed or partly agreed that the setting of economic priorities within the health care system was necessary. Ninety-three per cent had experienced a conflict between their responsibility towards the individual patient and the requirement for them to manage the health budget. The responses suggest that doctors act more in the interests of their patient than the interests of society. However, 68 per cent reported having refrained from giving the best treatment to patients because it was too expensive. As many as 60 per cent of the respondents wanted more public guidelines. Only 10 per cent wanted doctors to have more influence in difficult questions arising from setting priorities.
PubMed ID
7674280 View in PubMed
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Cost containment: the Americas. Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217563
Source
New Horiz. 1994 Aug;2(3):332-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
R. Barnett
A. Shustack
Author Affiliation
Division of Critical Care, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
New Horiz. 1994 Aug;2(3):332-5
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Control - methods
Critical Care - economics - utilization
Forecasting
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Expenditures
Hospital Costs
Humans
Intensive Care Units - utilization
Length of Stay - economics
Patient Admission - economics
Abstract
Resources allocated for health care in Canada are about to be decreased. In recent years, the Canadian healthcare system has been consuming a progressively greater share of the country's gross domestic product. Due to recession, less revenue is available for health care. The need to contain and limit national healthcare spending has begun to affect resource allocation in Canadian ICUs. Increasing efficiency and reducing inappropriate use may not be enough to contain costs. More difficult decisions need to be made.
PubMed ID
8087592 View in PubMed
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[Cost control for intensive care units].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226383
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 May;68(4):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
P. Jacobs
T. Noseworthy
Author Affiliation
Services de santé et en médecine communautaire à l'université de l'Alberta.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1991 May;68(4):13-5
Date
May-1991
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Control
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Facility Administrators - methods
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Intensive Care Units - economics - trends
PubMed ID
2060730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness in ambulatory care: alternative approaches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216710
Source
J Ambul Care Manage. 1995 Jan;18(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
D E Angus
L. Auer
J E Cloutier
T. Albert
Author Affiliation
Queen's-University of Ottawa Economic Projects, Canada.
Source
J Ambul Care Manage. 1995 Jan;18(1):29-38
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Cost Control
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Health Care Rationing - economics
Health Expenditures
Health Services Research
Humans
Models, Econometric
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
By relating health care resources and their use to health outcomes, through a coherent macro resource allocation framework, one can examine the health care system for allocative efficiencies. In this article, costs and outcomes are analyzed in such a framework, scenarios for optimizing the use of health care resources--while still maintaining existing health outcomes--are explored, and the implications for ambulatory care are discussed. The research clearly shows that much can be done to make health care systems more efficient without jeopardizing health outcomes.
PubMed ID
10139344 View in PubMed
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68 records – page 1 of 7.