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Chances of late surgery in relation to length of wait lists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172732
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005;5:63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Boris G Sobolev
Adrian R Levy
Lisa Kuramoto
Robert Hayden
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. bsobolev@shaw.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2005;5:63
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Coronary Disease - radiography - surgery
Female
Health Care Rationing - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multi-Institutional Systems - standards
Needs Assessment
Odds Ratio
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Registries
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The proportion of patients who undergo surgery within a clinically safe time is an important performance indicator in health systems that use wait lists to manage access to care. However, little is known about chances of on-time surgery according to variations in existing demand. We sought to determine what proportion of patients have had late coronary bypass surgery after registration on wait lists of different size in a network of hospitals with uniform standards for timing of surgery.
Using records from a population-based registry, we studied wait-list times prospectively collected in a cohort of patients registered on wait lists for coronary artery bypass grafting procedures. We compared the number of weeks from registration to surgery against target access times established for three urgency groups. The chances of undergoing surgery within target time have been evaluated in relation to wait-list size at registration and the number of surgeries performed without registration on a wait list.
In 1991-2001, two in three patients were at risk of late surgery when registered on wait lists for isolated coronary bypass procedures in British Columbia, Canada. Although urgent patients had never seen a wait list with clearance time exceeding one week, the odds of on-time surgery were reduced by 25%, odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-0.87) for every additional operation performed without registration on a list. When the wait list at registration required a clearance time of over one month, semi-urgent patients had 51% lower odds of on-time surgery as compared to lists with clearance time less than one week, OR = 0.49 (95%CI 0.41-0.60), after adjustment for age, sex, comorbidity, calendar period, hospital and week on the list. In the non-urgent group, the odds were 69% lower, OR = 0.31 (95%CI 0.20-0.47). Every time an operation in the same hospital was performed without registration on a wait list, the odds of on-time surgery for listed patients were reduced by 7%, OR = 0.93 (95%CI 0.91-0.95) in the semi-urgent group, and by 10%, OR = 0.90 (95%CI 0.87-0.94), in the non-urgent group.
Chances of late surgery increase with the wait-list size for semi-urgent and non-urgent patients needing coronary bypass surgery. The weekly number of patients who move immediately from angiography to the operation without registration on a wait list reduced chances of surgery within target time in all urgency groups of listed patients. When advising patients who will be placed on the wait list about the expected time to treatment, hospital managers should take into account the current list size as well as the weekly number of patients who require CABG immediately after undergoing coronary angiography.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16185357 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do longer delays for coronary artery bypass surgery contribute to preoperative mortality in less urgent patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168658
Source
Med Care. 2006 Jul;44(7):680-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Boris G Sobolev
Adrian R Levy
Lisa Kuramoto
Robert Hayden
J Mark FitzGerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, The University of British Columbia, 828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada. sobolev@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Med Care. 2006 Jul;44(7):680-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia - epidemiology
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Health Care Rationing - statistics & numerical data
Health Priorities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Priority wait lists are common for managing access to cardiac surgery in publicly funded health systems. We evaluated whether longer delays contribute to the probability of death before surgery among patients prioritized into the less urgent category.
We studied records of 9233 patients registered for isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in British Columbia, Canada. The primary outcome was death before surgery. We estimated the probability that a patient, who could be removed from the list as a result of surgery, death, or other competing events, dies on or before a certain wait-list week.
Despite similar death rates in semiurgent and nonurgent groups, 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.80) versus 0.58 (0.36-0.80) per 1000 patient-weeks, nonurgent patients were remaining on the list longer, which contributed to higher cumulative incidence of all-cause death than in semiurgent group (adjusted odds ratio = 1.66; 1.03-2.68). By 52 weeks on the wait list, 0.9% (0.6-1.1) and 1.3% (0.8-1.8) of patients died in semiurgent and nonurgent groups, respectively (P
PubMed ID
16799363 View in PubMed
Less detail