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Achieving cardiovascular health through continuing interprofessional development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190531
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D M Kaufman
J. McClaran
M. Toombs
S. Beardall
I. Levy
A. Chockalingam
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy - education
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing
Health Behavior
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Life Style
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Public Health
Abstract
In order to achieve cardiovascular health for all Canadians, the ACHIC (Achieving Cardiovascular Health in Canada) partnership advocates that health promotion for healthy lifestyles be incorporated into practice, and that the consistent messages and professional skills required to motivate patients and the public be acquired through interprofessional education and development. Professional education specialists are essential members of health care promotion teams with expertise to develop educational interventions that impact behaviours of health professionals and subsequent patient outcomes. Continuing medical education (CME) is in evolution to continuing professional development (CPD), and then to continuing inter-professional development (CID). Providers of health promotion, public health, and health care can work with health educators to complete the cascade of learning, change in practice, and improvement in patient outcomes. The Canadian health care system can empower Canadians to achieve cardiovascular health, the most important health challenge in the 21st century.
PubMed ID
11962121 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1997 Nov;27(11):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
N. Creason
Author Affiliation
East Tennessee State University, College of Nursing, Johnson City, USA.
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1997 Nov;27(11):9-11
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Data Collection
Goals
Health Care Coalitions
Humans
Nursing - manpower
Questionnaires
Regional Health Planning
PubMed ID
9372801 View in PubMed
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Autonomy of the volunteer sector in the evaluation of public health programs: an exploration from the perspective of an HIV/AIDS coalition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133816
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Mar;43(1):42-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Hélène Laperriêre
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Mar;43(1):42-58
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Conflict (Psychology)
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Care Coalitions - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Program Evaluation
Volunteers - organization & administration
Abstract
As recommended in the Ottawa Charter, Canadian government agencies are counting on the involvement of grassroots organizations to implement federal public health programs at the local level. At issue is the forced acceptance by community organizations of the predefined role of suppliers of services. Because of the top-down issues of health promotion practice, the problem is crucial for public health nursing.The author uses reflexive analysis, grounded in the internal colonization framework, to explore the case of a Canadian public health program and its relations with a provincial coalition of volunteer organizations working on AIDS issues. Implementing the Ottawa Charter highlights the challenges of the meanings and actions inherent in the notion of partnership between public agencies and community organizations of volunteers. Participation suggests more democratic and egalitarian social organizations, with hierarchical structures in a broader image of a modern society.
PubMed ID
21661615 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for heart health promotion: results of a 5-year experience in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186929
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
David R MacLean
Jane Farquharson
Stephanie Heath
Kari Barkhouse
Celeste Latter
Christine Joffres
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, 5849 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4H7 Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Education
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Nova Scotia
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
To present the outcomes of a capacity-building initiative for heart health promotion.
Follow-up study combining quantitative and qualitative methods.
The Western Health Region of Nova Scotia, Canada.
Twenty organizations, including provincial and municipal agencies and community groups engaged in health, education, and recreation activities.
Two strategies were used for this study: partnership development and organizational development. Partnership development included the creation of multilevel partnerships in diverse sectors. Organizational development included the provision of technical support, action research, community activation, and organizational consultation.
Quantitative data included number and type of partnerships, learning opportunities, community activation initiatives, and organizational changes. Qualitative data included information on the effectiveness of partnerships, organizational consultation, and organizational changes.
Results included the development of 204 intersectoral partnerships, creation of a health promotion clearinghouse, 47 workshops attended by approximately 1400 participants, diverse research products, implementation of 18 community heart health promotion initiatives, and increased organizational capacity for heart health promotion via varied organizational changes, including policy changes, fund reallocations, and enhanced knowledge and practices.
Partnership and organizational development were effective mechanisms for building capacity in heart health promotion. This intervention may have implications for large-scale, community-based, chronic-disease prevention projects.
PubMed ID
12545589 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Consortium for Health Promotion Research: a network that adds value to governments and universities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184697
Source
Promot Educ. 2003;10(1):16-9, 45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Suzanne F Jackson
Author Affiliation
Canadian Consortium for Health Promotion Research, C/o Centre for Health Promotion, University of Toronto, 100 College St., Suite 207, Toronto, ON M5G 1L5. suzanne.jackson@utoronto.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2003;10(1):16-9, 45
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making, Organizational
Financing, Government
Government Agencies
Health Care Coalitions
Health promotion
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Universities - organization & administration
PubMed ID
12838715 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Heart Health Initiative: dissemination perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210680
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87 Suppl 2:S57-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Stachenko
Author Affiliation
Disease Prevention Division, Health Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Nov-Dec;87 Suppl 2:S57-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Community Networks
Health Care Coalitions
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Abstract
The Canadian Heart Health Initiative is a country-wide strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Initiated with a 15-year horizon, it has resulted in extensive networks and coalitions involving Health Canada, the 10 provincial departments of health and over 1,000 organizations. There are five phases: policy development through country-wide consultations (1986-88); provincial heart health surveys (1986-91); research demonstration programs (1989-97); and evaluation (1994-97). The dissemination research phase studies the adoption of interventions by communities and health systems. As a paradigm for dissemination of health policy, some key features of the Initiative are translation of the science base in prevention into community programs; consensual policy development; federal and provincial co-funding arrangements; key role played by the public health system; capacity building; organization and management model linking activities at the national, provincial and community levels. The methodologies and capacities developed are applicable to other health promotion and disease prevention areas.
PubMed ID
9002346 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic disease prevention and the politics of scale: lessons from Canadian health reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119054
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2012;27(7):639-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jeffrey R Masuda
Kerry Robinson
Susan J Elliott
John Eyles
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. jeff_masuda@umanitoba.ca
Source
Soc Work Public Health. 2012;27(7):639-57
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity building
Checklist
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Health Care Coalitions
Health Care Reform
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Promotion - methods
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors examine the politics of health-promotion dissemination in health policy using provincial cases from the Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI)-Dissemination Phase, a nationwide chronic disease prevention initiative that took place between 1994 and 2005. Drawing on an analysis of health policy documents and key informant interviews from three provincial CHHI projects, the authors highlight the challenges to incorporate health-promotion strategies oriented toward collective approaches to health within variably "individual" oriented policy climates during a time of health reform. In doing this, the authors uncover a "politics of scale" where researchers developed very different strategies to advance chronic disease prevention within a contested political terrain. What emerged were strategies unique to provincial context. Understanding the politics of scale within health policy development provides insight into how health-promotion strategies should be shaped to achieve maximum effect.
PubMed ID
23145549 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.