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25-year trends and socio-demographic differences in response rates: Finnish adult health behaviour survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168616
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hanna Tolonen
Satu Helakorpi
Kirsi Talala
Ville Helasoja
Tuija Martelin
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. hanna.tolonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(6):409-15
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Education - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
When estimating population level changes in health indicators, the declining response rate, especially if also the characteristics of non-respondents are changing may bias the outcome. There is evidence that survey response rates are declining in many countries. It is also known that respondents and non-respondents differ in their socio-economic and demographic status as well as in their health and health behaviours. There is no information about the changes in the differences between respondents and non-respondents over time. Our purpose was to investigate the changes over time in the differences between respondents and non-respondents in respect to their sex, age, marital status and educational level. The data from the Finnish Adult Health Behaviour Survey (1978-2002) was used. The response rate declined over the past 25 years for both men and women in all age groups. The decline was faster among men than women, and also faster in younger age groups than older age groups. There is a marked difference in the response rate between married and non-married persons but it did not change over time. Also the response rate between different educational levels differed for both men and women, and this difference increased over the years. The declining response rate and at the same time occurring change in the non-respondent characteristics will decrease the representativeness of the results, limit the comparability of the results with other surveys, increase the bias of the trend estimates and limit the comparability of the results between population groups.
PubMed ID
16804763 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking and family structure in Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31283
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Dawn Griesbach
Amanda Amos
Candace Currie
Author Affiliation
Child and Adolescent Health Research Unit (CAHRU), Department of PE, Sport and Leisure Studies, University of Edinburgh, St. Leonard's Land, Holyrood Road, EH8 8AQ, Edinburgh, UK. dawn.griesbach@isd.csa.scot.nhs.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2003 Jan;56(1):41-52
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Austria - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - epidemiology
Europe - epidemiology
Family - ethnology
Finland - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Humans
Income
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Smoking - ethnology
Social Change
Social Class
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between family structure and smoking among 15-year-old adolescents in seven European countries. It also investigates the association between family structure and a number of known smoking risk factors including family socio-economic status, the adolescent's disposable income, parental smoking and the presence of other smokers in the adolescent's home. Findings are based on 1998 survey data from a cross-national study of health behaviours among children and adolescents. Family structure was found to be significantly associated with smoking among 15-year-olds in all countries, with smoking prevalence lowest among adolescents in intact families and highest among adolescents in stepfamilies. Multivariate analysis showed that several risk factors were associated with higher smoking prevalences in all countries, but that even after these other factors were taken into account, there was an increased likelihood of smoking among adolescents in stepfamilies. Further research is needed to determine the possible reasons for this association.
PubMed ID
12435550 View in PubMed
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Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native health behavior: findings from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 1992-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3490
Source
Ethn Dis. 1999;9(3):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
C H Denny
T L Taylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3717, USA. cfd3@cdc.gov
Source
Ethn Dis. 1999;9(3):403-9
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk-Taking
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences between American Indian and white adults in behavioral risk factors for chronic disease and injury. METHODS: Data were drawn from the 1992-1995 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an ongoing telephone survey of health behaviors of adults. Prevalence estimates by sex were calculated for American Indian and white respondents in 15 states and the significance of their differences evaluated by chi-square tests. RESULTS: American Indians were found to be at significantly higher risk than whites for fair to poor general health status, medical cost difficulties, binge drinking, cigarette smoking, not always using safety belts, being diagnosed as diabetic, and obesity. CONCLUSIONS: To reduce the gap in behavioral risk factors between American Indians and whites, more resources need to be dedicated to American Indian health. Note. The term "American Indian" henceforth refers to those who identify themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native.
PubMed ID
10600063 View in PubMed
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American Indians and Alaska Natives in California: women's cancer screening and results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3869
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Delight E Satter
Brenda F Seals
Y Jenny Chia
Melissa Gatchell
Linda Burhansstipanov
Author Affiliation
UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA. delight@ucla.edu
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):58-64
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
California
Comparative Study
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mammography - utilization
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND METHODS: The purpose of this article was to examine differences in demographics, general health status, and utilization of breast and cervical cancer screening for subgroups of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey. RESULTS: The statewide distribution of California American Indians, non-California AIANs, and unknown AIANs are 10%, 51%, and 39%, respectively. Significant differences exist among the 3 tribal subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, AIAN women aged 40+ years are close to the Healthy People 2010 goals for receipt of a mammogram in the past 2 years and for receipt of a Pap test ever and in the past 3 years. Less than 5% of AIAN in California report Indian Health Service coverage.
PubMed ID
15916523 View in PubMed
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An examination of the difference in performance of self-care behaviours between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery: a secondary analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138747
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Suzanne Fredericks
Joyce Lo
Sarah Ibrahim
Jennifer Leung
Author Affiliation
Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON. sfrederi@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
China - ethnology
Coronary Artery Bypass - nursing - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Compliance - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The demographic profile of the patient receiving coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Canada has changed significantly over the past 20 years from mainly white (i.e., English, Irish, Scottish) to non-white (i.e., Indian or Chinese). To support individuals who have recently undergone a CABG procedure, patient education is provided to guide performance of self-care behaviours in the home environment. The relevance of this education, when applied to the current CABG surgery population, is questionable, as it was designed and tested using a white, homogenous sample. Thus, the number and type of self-care behaviours performed by persons of Indian and Chinese origin has not been investigated. These individuals may have varying self-care needs that are not reflected in the current self-care patient education materials.
The intent of this study was to examine the difference in the type and number of self-care behaviours performed between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery.
This study is a sub-study of a descriptive, exploratory design that included a convenience sample. Ninety-nine patients were recruited, representing three cultural groups (White, Indian, and Chinese). Descriptive data were used to describe the sample and identify specific self-care behaviours performed in the home environment.
Results indicate statistically significant differences between white and non-white individuals related to use of incentive spirometer (p = 0.04), deep breathing and coughing exercises (p = 0.04), and activity modification (p
PubMed ID
21141231 View in PubMed
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An overview of factors influencing the health of Canadian Inuit infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3454
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):17-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Alison L Jenkins
Theresa W Gyorkos
Kate N Culman
Brian J Ward
Gary S Pekeles
Elaine L Mills
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):17-39
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Environment
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant Nutrition Disorders - epidemiology
Infant Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Inuit infants throughout the Arctic experience higher mortality and poorer health than their non-Inuit counterparts, and suffer disproportionately from bacterial and viral infections. STUDY DESIGN:This review examines the health status of these infants, with a focus on Canadian Inuit communities and reference to other circumpolar regions, as appropriate. It is based on a Medline search (1965 to present), special analyses of the 1996 Canadian Census and various national surveys, and selected government reports and documents. RESULTS: A wide range of inter-related factors affect the health of Inuit infants: their demographic, social, economic and physical environment, as well as personal health practices and the availability of high quality, culturally appropriate health services. Some of these factors may influence the susceptibility of Inuit infants to infection. Smoking is highly prevalent in Inuit communities, and its indisputable negative effects on health, including increased risk of respiratory tract infection in infants, represent an urgent public health challenge. CONCLUSION: Locally driven, focused and methodologically sound epidemiological research that addresses key gaps in knowledge could lead to more appropriate and effective preventive strategies to improve health in northern communities.
PubMed ID
12725339 View in PubMed
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The Arctic Human Health Initiative: a legacy of the International Polar Year 2007-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107822
Source
Pages 69-86 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):69-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. ajp1@cdc.gov
Source
Pages 69-86 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):69-86
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Awareness
Communicable diseases - ethnology
Cooperative Behavior
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Mental Health - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Research
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
World Health
Abstract
The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions. The Arctic Human Health Initiative (AHHI) was a US-led Arctic Council IPY coordinating project that aimed to build and expand on existing International Union for Circumpolar Health (IUCH) and Arctic Council human health interests. The project aimed to link researchers with potential international collaborators and to serve as a focal point for human health research, education, outreach and communication activities during the IPY. The progress of projects conducted as part of this initiative up until the end of the Arctic Council Swedish chairmanship in May 2013 is summarized in this report.
The overall goals of the AHHI was to increase awareness and visibility of human health concerns of Arctic peoples, foster human health research, and promote health strategies that will improve health and well-being of all Arctic residents. Proposed activities to be recognized through the initiative included: expanding research networks that will enhance surveillance and monitoring of health issues of concern to Arctic peoples, and increase collaboration and coordination of human health research; fostering research that will examine the health impact of anthropogenic pollution, rapid modernization and economic development, climate variability, infectious and chronic diseases, intentional and unintentional injuries, promoting education, outreach and communication that will focus public and political attention on Arctic health issues, using a variety of publications, printed and electronic reports from scientific conferences, symposia and workshops targeting researchers, students, communities and policy makers; promoting the translation of research into health policy and community action including implementation of prevention strategies and health promotion; and promoting synergy and strategic direction of Arctic human health research and health promotion.
As of 31 March, 2009, the official end of the IPY, AHHI represented a total of 38 proposals, including 21 individual Expressions of Intent (EoI), and 9 full proposals (FP), submitted to the IPY Joint Committee for review and approval from lead investigators from the US, Canada, Greenland, Norway, Finland, Sweden and the Russian Federation. In addition, there were 10 National Initiatives (NI-projects undertaken during IPY beyond the IPY Joint Committee review process). Individual project details can be viewed at www.arctichealth.org. The AHHI currently monitors the progress of 28 individual active human health projects in the following thematic areas: health network expansion (5 projects), infectious disease research (7 projects), environmental health research (7 projects), behavioral and mental health research (4 projects), and outreach education and communication (5 projects).
While some projects have been completed, others will continue well beyond the IPY. The IPY 2007-2008 represented a unique opportunity to further stimulate cooperation and coordination on Arctic health research and increase the awareness and visibility of Arctic regions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23971017 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessing health-related quality of life in Northern Plains American Indians: prominence of physical activity as a health behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100501
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dmitri Poltavski
Jeffrey Holm
Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm
Leander McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of North DakotaGrand Forks, ND 58202-8380, USA. dpoltavski@medicine.nodak.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2010;17(1):25-48
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.) - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Motor Activity - physiology
New Mexico - epidemiology - ethnology
North Dakota - epidemiology - ethnology
Quality of Life - psychology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Rural Population
United States - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly associated with better self-reported overall health, fewer mentally unhealthy and activity limitation days in the past 30 days, and with a greater number of good health days.
PubMed ID
20683822 View in PubMed
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176 records – page 1 of 18.