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2519 records – page 1 of 252.

Identifying risk factors for disease no guarantee patients will modify behavior, conference told.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218446
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Apr 1;150(7):1145-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Apr-1-1994
Author
A. Silversides
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Apr 1;150(7):1145-6
Date
Apr-1-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Health Behavior
Humans
Ontario
Risk factors
PubMed ID
8137200 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Apr;113(4):136
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
J. Dørup
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Apr;113(4):136
Date
Apr-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Denmark
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Nord Med. 1997 Dec;112(10):3709441278
PubMed ID
9579097 View in PubMed
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Economic shocks and health resilience: lessons from the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295332
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2016 12 02; 38(4):e409-e418
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-02-2016
Author
Vladimir S Gordeev
Yevgeniy Goryakin
Martin McKee
David Stuckler
Bayard Roberts
Author Affiliation
Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK.
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2016 12 02; 38(4):e409-e418
Date
12-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Economic Recession
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Russia
Notes
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PubMed ID
28158731 View in PubMed
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Tinnitus Stages of Change Questionnaire: psychometric development and validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166345
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2006 Nov;11(4):483-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Viktor Kaldo
Jeff Richards
Gerhard Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. viktor.kaldo@psyk.uu.se
Source
Psychol Health Med. 2006 Nov;11(4):483-97
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Health Behavior
Humans
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Sweden
Tinnitus - physiopathology
Abstract
This study describes the development of the Tinnitus Stages of Change Questionnaire (TSOCQ), which aims to assess the readiness of tinnitus patients to change their behaviors and attitudes in relation to tinnitus. Its ability to predict treatment outcome was also investigated. One hundred and fifty-one patients with tinnitus completed the questionnaire. Through repeated principal component analyses, together with judgments of the factors' theoretical relevance, empirically and clinically meaningful scales were derived. A factor solution in accordance with the transtheoretical model (TTM) and with acceptable psychometric properties was found with the five scales of the TSOCQ labeled Precontemplation (Medical Solution), Precontemplation (Helplessness), Contemplation, Preparation and Action/Maintenance. Participants scoring high on Precontemplation (Helplessness) and low on Action/Maintenance had better treatment outcomes. In conclusion, the TSOCQ had some ability to predict treatment success, but further research is required into the utility of the TTM for understanding the rehabilitation process in tinnitus patients.
PubMed ID
17129924 View in PubMed
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Harm-reduction initiative provides alcohol to Ottawa's street alcoholics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192935
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Oct 2;165(7):937
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2001
Author
J. Hass
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Oct 2;165(7):937
Date
Oct-2-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - therapy
Beer
Canada
Health Behavior
Homeless Persons
Humans
PubMed ID
11599335 View in PubMed
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[THE EVALUATION OF RESPONSIBILITY CITIZEN FOR ONE'S OWN HEALTH FROM THE POSITIONS OF MEDICAL WORKERS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266999
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 May-Jun;23(3):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J A Dauletkalieva
D B Kulov
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2015 May-Jun;23(3):11-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Health Behavior
Humans
Russia
Abstract
The article demonstrates necessity of implementing principle of solidary responsibility of citizenfore one's own health with purpose of health promotion and development of health care in country and all over the world. The analysis of national and international literature proved that human health in many ways depends on life style. Nowadays, population places the responsibility for one's own health to state, employers and medical personnel. The article presents main results of anonymous questionnaire survey carried out among 723 workers of municipal polyclinics. The software Statisitka was applied to determine relative frequency of occurrence of characteristic in different groups (percentage) and confidence range. The comparative analysis according the Student criterion was applied among physicians and paramedical personnel. The purpose of survey was to evaluate degree of responsibility of population for one's own health from point of view of medical personnel. It is established that 69.5% of physicians and 79.6% of paramedical personnel consider their patients responsible for implementation of prescribed recommendations. The opposite point of view have 30.5% of physicians and 20.4% of paramedical personnel. According opinion of 42.9% Of physicians and 48.9% of paramedical personnel human age has no impact on degree of one's own health caring. The physicians of polyclinics evaluate responsibility of citizenfor one's own health quite low. So, only 11. 6% of physicians and 28.6% of paramedical personnel of polyclinics provide positive reply to the asked question. The majority of physicians (37.4%) and medical nurses (34.2%) are convinced that to increase responsibility for one's own health the activities infield of health education are to be implemented. The application of the mechanism of co-payments for medical services is supported by 34.6% of physicians and 27.4% of medical nurses. The given question caused difficulties with answer among 20.2% of physicians and 32.2% of medical nurses.
PubMed ID
26411160 View in PubMed
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[Take your own responsibility when it comes to your health!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198461
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Apr 17;162(16):2350-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2000
Author
H. Rothe
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Apr 17;162(16):2350-1
Date
Apr-17-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
PubMed ID
10827570 View in PubMed
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Interventions implemented through sporting organisations for increasing participation in sport.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156036
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(3):CD004812
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Naomi Priest
Rebecca Armstrong
Jodie Doyle
Elizabeth Waters
Author Affiliation
McCaughey Centre, Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, 5/207 Bouverie St, Parkville, VIC, Australia, 3052. npriest@unimelb.edu.au
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(3):CD004812
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Organizations
Sports
Abstract
There is now compelling scientific evidence that increased levels of physical activity can bring wide-ranging health benefits. These benefits can extend beyond physical health to include other positive impacts relating to mental health and personal development. The sport and recreation sector is viewed as a priority area for increasing rates of physical activity. Participation rates in organised sport have been shown to be lower in females and to decline with age, and are reduced in lower socio-economic and minority groups including people from non-English speaking and Indigenous backgrounds. It is important to determine the most effective interventions that sporting organisations can use to increase people's participation.
To update a review of all controlled studies evaluating interventions implemented through sporting organisations to increase participation.
We updated the original (2004) searches in May 2007. We searched: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2 2007); MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations (2004 to Week 3 April 2007); EMBASE (2004 to Week 17 2007); PsyclNFO (2004 to April Week 1 2007); CINAHL (2004 to Week 1 May 2007); SPORTDiscus (2004 to April 2007); Sociological Abstracts (2004 to 2007); Dissertation Abstracts (2004 to May 2007), and a number of freely-available online health promotion and sports-related databases. We used the internet extensively to search for studies and locate information generated by sporting bodies throughout the world.
Controlled studies evaluating any intervention designed to increase active and/ or non-active participation in sport by people of all ages. Interventions could include: mass media campaigns; information or education sessions; management or organisational change strategies; policy changes, for example to improve the socio-cultural environment to encourage people of specific age, gender or ethnicity to participate; changes to traditional or existing programs, for example club or association-initiated rule modification programs; provision of activities beyond traditional or existing programs, for example 'Come and Try' initiatives (teaser or taster programs); skill improvement programs; volunteer encouragement programs. Uncontrolled studies which met other inclusion criteria were to be reported in an annex to the review.
We assessed whether identified citations met the inclusion criteria. Two review authors independently inspected abstracts (NP, RA). We obtained full papers where necessary. As we located no controlled evaluation studies, we did not undertake data collection or analysis. We found no uncontrolled studies meeting other inclusion criteria, and therefore present no annex to the review.
Despite a thorough review of the published and unpublished literature, we found no rigorous studies evaluating the effects of interventions organised through sporting organisations to increase participation in sport.
There is an absence of high quality evidence to support interventions designed and delivered by sporting organisations to increase participation in sport. Interventions funded and conducted in this area must be linked to a rigorous evaluation strategy in order to examine overall effectiveness, socio-demographic differentials in participation and cost-effectiveness of these strategies.
Notes
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(2):CD00481215846733
PubMed ID
18646112 View in PubMed
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Public health research in Norway: Selected topics. Introduction to the supplement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139196
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Margareta Wandel
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(5 Suppl):4-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Public Health
Research
PubMed ID
21062833 View in PubMed
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Anchorage health needs assessment study: the consumer's health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290922
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 108 leaves.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1979
Author
Ender, Richard L.
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 108 leaves.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Alaska
Anchorage
Patient satisfaction
Health Behavior
Health attitudes
Health Surveys
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RA448.A5E525 1979
UAF - ALASKA RA448.A5A525
"Final research report, Anchorage Urban Observatory Program, May 1979."
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2519 records – page 1 of 252.