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Establishing best practices for Alaska Native elders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99668
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sep-2004
........................................................................................................................ 1 A. The Concept of "Best Practice"................................................................................. 1 B. Best Practices for Responding to the Needs of Alaska Native Elders.................... 1 C. Establishing “Healing Practices” for Alaska Native Elders
  1 document  
Author
Segal, B
Author Affiliation
College of Health and Social Welfare, University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Elders
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aging
Alaska Natives
Best practice
Boarding schools
Community healing
Cultural framework
Cultural heritage
Elders
Healing journeys
Healing practices
Healthy relationships
Knowledge bearers
Self-determination
Self-worth
Traditional customs
Abstract
There are two ways to seek to establish best practices for Alaska Native Elders. The first represents an attempt to emulate documented practices chiefly established to provide services to non-indigenous people in the United States. This approach utilizes theories that have been developed for "mainstream USA" that are then applied to Alaska Natives. The second approach involves undertaking an understanding of the physical, sociocultural, and economic factors involved in the life of Alaska Native Elders. This method involves the development of innovative theories that represent the values of the people, which leads to novel practices that can result in establishing best practice procedures meaningful to the population to be served. This approach has been adopted in pursuing best practices for Alaska Native Elders.
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yr1_3best-practices.pdf

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Indigenous and Euro-American science: Two perspectives on Native American healing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101992
Source
Bridges (newsmagazine of the International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies & Energy Medicine). 1994 Spr;5(1):11-12,15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-1994
Author
Kremer, JW
Author Affiliation
California Institute of Integral Studies
Source
Bridges (newsmagazine of the International Society for the Study of Subtle Energies & Energy Medicine). 1994 Spr;5(1):11-12,15
Date
Spr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Community
Euro-Americans
Healing
Healing practices
Indigenous science
Native American
Western science
Abstract
The western scientific approach commonly entails a stripping away of what is considered extraneous and the isolation of what is considered effective. Indigenous science, on the other hand, would begin with the culturally specific, ecologically and historically grounded indigenous understanding of the "good mind," a balanced way of living in community on a particular land.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 101989.
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Source
Presentation given at 123rd annual American Public Health Association meeting, San Diego, California, November 1995
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
Morgan, R.
Source
Presentation given at 123rd annual American Public Health Association meeting, San Diego, California, November 1995
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Contemporary medicine
Healing practices
Indigenous people
Traditional healing
Abstract
Before contact, the indigenous people of Alaska depended on knowledge of anatomy, herbal medicine, and other healing practices for health maintenance. With contact, a social system that had been ideally suited to its purpose was destroyed and replaced by another, ill-suited to the temperament as well as to the social, physiological, and psychological needs of the Alaskan Native.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 101971.
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Use of traditional Mi'kmaq medicine among patients at a First Nations community health centre

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101162
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Spring;10(2):95-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spring-2005
  1 website  
Author
Cook, SJ
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie Medical School Department of Family Medicine Rural Summer Program
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Spring;10(2):95-99
Date
Spring-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Canada
First Nations
Health care
Mi'kmaq medicine
Traditional healing practices
Western medicine
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The provision of complete, effective, and culturally sensitive health care to First Nations communities requires a familiarity with and respect for patients' healing beliefs and practices. PURPOSE: This study addresses one aspect of cross-cultural care by attempting to understand the use of Mi'kmaq medicine among patients at a community health centre and their attitudes toward both Mi'kmaq and Western medicine. METHODS: A questionnaire was completed by 100 patients (14 men, 86 women) at the clinic. The majority (66%) of respondents had used Mi'kmaq medicine, and 92.4% of these respondents had not discussed this with their physician. Of those who had used Mi'kmaq medicine, 24.3% use it as first-line treatment when they are ill, and 31.8% believe that Mi'kmaq medicine is better overall than Western. Even among patients who have not used Mi'kmaq medicine, 5.9% believe that it is more effective than Western medicine in treating illness. CONCLUSION: These results have implications for the delivery of health care to First Nations patients, especially in terms of understanding patients' health care values and in meeting the need to provide effective cross-cultural care.
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