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Acute treatment of whiplash neck sprain injuries. A randomized trial of treatment during the first 14 days after a car accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72624
Source
Spine. 1998 Jan 1;23(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1998
Author
G E Borchgrevink
A. Kaasa
D. McDonagh
T C Stiles
O. Haraldseth
I. Lereim
Author Affiliation
Emergency Clinic, University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Spine. 1998 Jan 1;23(1):25-31
Date
Jan-1-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease
Adult
Attention
Attitude to Health
Braces
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Neck
Neck Pain - etiology
Pain Measurement
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shoulder
Sick Leave
Single-Blind Method
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Whiplash Injuries - complications - rehabilitation - therapy
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A single-blinded, randomized treatment study with a follow-up period of 6 months. OBJECTIVE: To study the long-term consequences of whiplash neck sprain injuries in patients treated with two different regimes during the first 14 days after the car accident. Patients in the first group were encouraged to act as usual, i.e., continue to engage in their normal, pre-injury activities; that group was compared with another group of patients who were given time off from work and who were immobilized using a soft neck collar. The end point of the comparison was the evaluation of subjective symptoms 6 months after the accident. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Few randomized treatment studies have been performed to evaluate the clinical outcome for patients with neck sprain. METHOD: Patients who participated in the study were recruited from the Emergency Clinic at the University Hospital in Trondheim, Norway. The study group included 201 patients (47% of the study group) with neck sprain that resulted from a car accident. Neck and shoulder movements and subjective symptoms, which were assessed using several different measurements, were assessed during the follow-up period. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction of symptoms from the time of intake to 24 weeks after the treatment period in both groups. There was a significantly better outcome for the act-as-usual group in terms of subjective symptoms, including pain localization, pain during daily activities, neck stiffness, memory, and concentration, and in terms of visual analog scale measurements of neck pain and headache. CONCLUSIONS: The outcome was better for patients who were encouraged to continue engaging in their normal, pre-injury activities as usual than for patients who took sick leave from work and who were immobilized during the first 14 days after the neck sprain injury.
PubMed ID
9460148 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects among women living with heavy snorers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72163
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2000 Mar;21(2):81-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Ulfberg
N. Carter
M. Talbäck
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Sleep Disorders Center, Avesta Hospital, Sweden. jan.ulfberg@ltdalarna.se
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2000 Mar;21(2):81-90
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Health
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
Headache - etiology - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Noise - adverse effects
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sleep Disorders - etiology - psychology
Sleep Stages
Snoring - physiopathology
Spouses - psychology
Abstract
Women living with heavy snorers were more frequently affected by symptoms of insomnia, morning headache, daytime sleepiness, and fatigue than women living with non-snorers. Questionnaire data were collected from 1,032 women 30 to 64 years of age residing in Dalarna county, in mid-Sweden. There were indications of a "dose-response relationship" between the conjectured sound exposure and reported symptoms, regardless of whether the female herself snored. Sleeping in separate bedrooms did not seem to give the women any alleviation. The results point to a possible contributory cause of disturbed sleep, morning headache, and daytime sleepiness among women living with a snoring spouse. The results also indicate that prevention and treatment of snoring are important issues for the couple as well as for the snorer.
PubMed ID
10818830 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and daily emergency department visits for headache in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158601
Source
Headache. 2008 Mar;48(3):417-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Headache. 2008 Mar;48(3):417-23
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Atmospheric Pressure
Canada
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
Many studies have indicated that weather can trigger headache. Here we propose a new methodological approach to assess the relationship between weather, ambient air pollution, and emergency department (ED) visits for this condition.
To examine the associations between ED visits for headache and selected meteorological and air pollution factors.
A hierarchical clusters design was used to study 10,497 ED visits for headache (ICD-9: 784) that occurred at a Montreal hospital between 1997 and 2002. The generalized linear mixed models technique was applied to create Poisson models for the clustered counts of visits for headache.
Statistically significant positive associations were observed between the number of ED visits for headache and the atmospheric pressure for all and for female visits for 1-day and 2-day lagged exposures. The percentage increase in daily ED female visits was 4.1% (95% CI: 2.0, 6.2), 3.4% (95% CI: 1.4, 5.6), and 2.2% (95% CI: 1.4, 5.6) for current day, 1-day and 2-day lagged exposure to SO(2), respectively, for an increase of an interquartile range (IQR) of 2.4 ppb. The percentage increase was also statistically significant for current day and 1-day lagged exposure to NO(2) and CO for all and for female visits.
Presented findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for headache are correlated to weather conditions and ambient air pollution - to atmospheric pressure and exposure to SO(2), NO(2), CO, and PM(2.5). An increase in levels of these factors is associated with an increase in the number of ED visits for headache.
PubMed ID
18302702 View in PubMed
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Allergy: a systemic disease? The HUNT and Young-HUNT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93524
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008 Dec;19(8):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Tollefsen Elin
Langhammer Arnulf
Bjermer Leif
Romundstad Pål
Holmen Turid Lingaas
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. elin.tollefsen@ntnu.no
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2008 Dec;19(8):730-6
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Headache - etiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology - physiopathology
Male
Muscles
Norway
Pain - etiology
Parents
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
A systemic nature of allergic diseases has been hypothesized. As part of this discussion, we studied if adolescent allergic wheeze and increasing combinations of allergic organ involvements (lung, nose and skin) would also increase the reporting of other health problems (headache, muscle pain and abdominal pain). In addition, we studied if parental asthma was associated with adolescent clustering of allergic expressions and if parental asthma with additional health problems (headache or muscle pain) was associated with adolescent reporting allergy in combination with headache, muscle pain and abdominal pain. Adolescents 13-19 yr (n = 8817, 89%) participated in the Young-HUNT study, Norway, 1995-97. Parental data on asthma were eligible in n = 5620. Health and lifestyle were measured by questionnaires and interviews. Associations with additional health problems were significantly strengthened with combinations of wheeze and other allergic expressions. Odds Ratio for associations 'wheeze only', 'wheeze and rhinitis' and 'wheeze, rhinitis and eczema' were for headache 2.1, 3.4 and 3.7; for muscle pain 2.8, 3.2 and 4.9; for abdominal pain 3.6, 4.0 and 4.9. All p for trend were
PubMed ID
18312534 View in PubMed
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The association between violence victimisation and common symptoms in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32534
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
G. Krantz
P O Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Box 121 33, S-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. gunillak@nhv.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Nov;54(11):815-21
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Irritable Mood
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between violence and abuse suffered by women during childhood or adult life, and the manifestation of a high level of common physical and mental symptoms. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A questionnaire was sent to a random population of women, 40 to 50 years of age, living in a rural Swedish community. The response rate was 81.7 per cent (397 women). Odds ratios were used to estimate bivariate associations between the experience of violence/abuse and common symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test for confounding and effect modification. MAIN RESULTS: The experience of violence or abuse during childhood was reported by 32.2 per cent of the women, while 15.6 per cent reported being abused as an adult. In both cases, these experiences reached statistical significance in their association with a high level of common symptoms (OR=1.67; 95% CI 1. 08, 2.49 and OR=2.26; 95%CI 1.30, 3.92, respectively). The associations between childhood and as well adult experience of violence or abuse and common symptoms were largely independent of potential confounders such as unemployment, job strain, social support, and sense of coherence. The combined exposure to adult violence/abuse and low psychosocial coping resources, such as low social support or a low level of sense of coherence, considerably increased the odds ratio for common symptoms and a synergistic effect seemed to exist. CONCLUSION: Violence or abuse experience is an important factor when considering illness manifestations in terms of common symptoms in women 40 to 50 years of age.
PubMed ID
11027194 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and risk of headache: a prospective study of 22 685 adults in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190887
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;72(4):463-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
K. Hagen
L J Stovner
L. Vatten
J. Holmen
J-A Zwart
G. Bovim
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Section of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. knut.hagen@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;72(4):463-6
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baroreflex
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brain Stem - physiology
Female
Headache - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Migraine Disorders - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Spinal Cord - physiology
Abstract
Prevalence studies of the association between blood pressure and headache have shown conflicting results. The aim was to analyse the relation between blood pressure and risk of headache in a prospective study.
A total of 22 685 adults not likely to have headache, had their baseline blood pressure measured in 1984-6, and responded to a headache questionnaire at follow up 11 years later (1995-7). The relative risk of headache (migraine or non-migrainous headache) was estimated in relation to blood pressure at baseline.
Those with a systolic blood pressure of 150 mm Hg or higher had 30% lower risk (risk ratio (RR)=0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.8) of having non-migrainous headache at follow up compared with those with systolic pressure lower than 140 mm Hg. For diastolic blood pressure, the risk of non-migrainous headache decreased with increasing values, and these findings were similar for both sexes, and were not influenced by use of antihypertensive medication. For migraine, there was no clear association with blood pressure.
In the first prospective study of blood pressure and the risk of headache, high systolic and diastolic pressures were associated with reduced risk of non-migrainous headache. One possible explanation may be the phenomenon of hypertension associated hypalgesia, which probably involves the baroreflex system influencing nociception in the brain stem or spinal cord.
Notes
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Comment In: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 Apr;72(4):43111909898
PubMed ID
11909904 View in PubMed
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Challenges in epilepsy-The perspective of Norwegian epilepsy patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301918
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Jul; 140(1):40-47
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2019
Author
Oliver Henning
Cecilie J Landmark
David Henning
Karl O Nakken
Morten I Lossius
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, The National Centre for Epilepsy, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Jul; 140(1):40-47
Date
Jul-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression - etiology
Epilepsy - complications - psychology
Fatigue - etiology
Female
Headache - etiology
Humans
Male
Memory Disorders - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vertigo - etiology
Abstract
For most people with epilepsy (PWE), problems that are not directly related to seizures may constitute major challenges in everyday life. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of these challenges and any risk factors for their occurrence among PWE in Norway, based on the patients' own perspective.
We used a web-based survey to ask PWE visiting the homepage of the Norwegian Epilepsy Association about different everyday challenges. A link to the survey was accessible via the members' homepage for a 4-month period during 2017.
One thousand one hundred eighty-two PWE responded to the questionnaire. Although more than 40% of the cohort reported that they had been seizure free for at least 1 year, the majority reported that tiredness (71%), memory problems (70%), concentration problems (68%), headache or vertigo (51%), and feeling depressed (59%) continued to represent challenges. In addition, fear of being alone, sexual problems or difficulties in social settings were reported by about one-third of the patients. Reporting having these challenges was significantly associated with female gender, polytherapy, experiencing seizures during the previous 12 months and feeling blue or depressed.
The results of this study, reflecting a self-selected Norwegian population, provide insights into the challenges not directly associated with seizures that impact on the quality of life of PWE. The impacts of such challenges may be underestimated as components of the entire burden of epilepsy.
PubMed ID
30963535 View in PubMed
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[Clinical manifestation and outcomes of concussion of the brain: comparison of the results in patients admitted to hospital and in those who have refused admission].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181557
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2003 Oct-Dec;(4):27-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
M M Filatova
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2003 Oct-Dec;(4):27-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Concussion - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Echoencephalography
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Nystagmus, Pathologic - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Tension-Type Headache - etiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Treatment Refusal
Vomiting - etiology
Abstract
The clinical manifestations and outcomes of concussion of the brain (CB) were comparatively analyzed in two groups of victims with acute brain injury (BI): those who had admitted to hospital and in those who had refused admission. A total of 355 individuals aged 16-35 years without concomitant somatic and neurological diseases were examined. The follow-up lasted 1 year. Clinical and neurological studies, computed tomography, and MR-imaging were used. In the acute period, the regression of neurological symptomatology and the better status of health were noted in the victims of both groups almost at the same time (on days 4-6 after injury). The psychovegetative syndrome was the basis of neurological disorders in the victims from both groups in the posttraumatic period. The follow-up has provided evidence for nearly equal numbers of victims with CB in both groups 1 year after BI.
PubMed ID
14959652 View in PubMed
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Clinical picture of community-acquired Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia requiring hospital treatment: a comparison between chlamydial and pneumococcal pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212745
Source
Thorax. 1996 Feb;51(2):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
M T Kauppinen
P. Saikku
P. Kujala
E. Herva
H. Syrjälä
Author Affiliation
Department in Oulu, National Public Health Institute, Finland.
Source
Thorax. 1996 Feb;51(2):185-9
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Community-Acquired Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Headache - etiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Male
Pneumonia, Bacterial - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - diagnosis - drug therapy - immunology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The importance of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a cause of pneumonia has remained controversial. The clinical picture of C pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia was compared during a C pneumoniae epidemic in Finland.
Group I consisted of 24 patients in whom serological testing and bacterial culture indicated an association with C pneumoniae only, group II comprised nine patients with both C pneumoniae and S pneumoniae, and group III consisted of 13 patients with S pneumoniae only.
The patients with C pneumoniae suffered from headache more frequently than the other patients (group I, 46%; group II, 11%; and group III, 15%) and had received antimicrobial treatment more often before admission to hospital (group I, 54%; groups II and III, 0%). The patients with C pneumoniae produced few good sputum samples and had suffered from respiratory symptoms longer than those with S pneumoniae (group I, 10 days; groups II and III, 4 days). C reactive protein values on admission were lowest in group I and highest in group II. The antimicrobial treatment provided in hospital covered C pneumoniae in 36% of cases in group I and 0% in group II, while S pneumoniae was covered in all patients. C pneumoniae and S pneumoniae together were associated with more severe disease and a longer stay in hospital.
Pneumonia caused by C pneumoniae was milder but clinically resembled that caused by S pneumoniae, and required hospital treatment even among young patients. Mixed infections were common and should be taken into account when planning antimicrobial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia. Further studies with more patients are needed to evaluate the severity of C pneumoniae pneumonia.
Notes
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Comment In: Thorax. 1996 Sep;51(9):9678984717
PubMed ID
8711653 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.