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25 years' experience with lymphangiomas in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201178
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Alqahtani
L T Nguyen
H. Flageole
K. Shaw
J M Laberge
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Lymphangioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The management of lymphangioma in children is challenging because complete resection is difficult to achieve in some cases, and recurrences are common. The authors reviewed their experience to assess the risk factors for recurrence and the role of nonoperative treatment.
A retrospective study over a period of 25 years was carried out. One hundred eighty-six patients with 191 lesions (five patients with de novo lesions in different sites) were treated. There were 98 boys and 88 girls. The average age at diagnosis was 3.3 years (range, fetal life to 17 years) and the average size 8 cm in diameter. Histocytological confirmation was obtained in all patients. The involved sites were head and neck, 89 patients (48%); trunk and extremities, 78 patients (42%); internal or visceral locations (eg, abdominal and thorax), 19 patients (10%). The treatment consisted of macroscopically complete excision in 145 patients (150 lesions, of which five were recurrences in different sites), partial excision in 10 patients, aspiration in five patients, laser excision in 10 patients, biopsy only in four patients, drainage and biopsy in two patients, and injection of sclerosing agents in 10 patients.
There were 54 recurrences; 44 underwent excision (five of them more than once), and five regressed spontaneously on follow-up. Five other recurrences were stable and not progressing. Recurrences, (defined as clinically obvious disease), were found to be 100% after aspiration, 100% after injection, 40% after incomplete excision, 40% after laser excision, and 17% after macroscopically complete excision. The recurrence rate in the last group was the highest in the head (33%), the least in the internal locations (0%), and intermediate for the cervical location (13%). There were no significant differences, in terms of outcome, between those who had their surgery immediately at the time of diagnosis (n = 101) and those who had delayed surgery (n = 85).
There were fewer recurrences after macroscopically complete excision. Aspiration and injection had the highest recurrence rate. Risk factors for recurrence included location, size, and complexity of lesions. A period of observation may be useful for infants to facilitate complete excision. In the present series, spontaneous regression was infrequent and was seen more often with recurrent lesions.
PubMed ID
10442614 View in PubMed
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Abandonment of newborn infants: a Danish forensic medical survey 1997-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133431
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Alexandra Gheorghe
Jytte Banner
Steen Holger Hansen
Uffe Stolborg
Niels Lynnerup
Author Affiliation
Stor Kongesgade 84, 2tv, 1264 Copenhagen, Denmark. svejme@hotmail.com
Source
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2011 Dec;7(4):317-21
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asphyxia - mortality - pathology
Brain Injuries - mortality - pathology
Burial - statistics & numerical data
Child, Abandoned - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Forensic Pathology
Head Injuries, Closed - mortality - pathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infanticide - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Skull Fractures - mortality - pathology
Time Factors
Umbilical Cord - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Concealment of pregnancy and newborn infant abandonment are closely associated with neonaticide, the killing of an infant within the first 24 h of life or less than 28-30 days depending on the jurisdiction. Abandonment of newborn infants occurs throughout the world and often the outcome for the infant is death. Together with neonaticide it is felt to be one of the least preventable crimes. In this retrospective study we present all forensically known Danish cases of abandoned newborn infant corpses, covering the period from 1997 to 2008. Eleven newborn infant corpses were found; we registered characteristics of the newborn infants and the circumstances of the cases based on autopsy reports. One further newborn infant was included, dating back to 1992, as it was found to be connected with one of the later cases. The mean age of the women who abandoned their newborn infants was 22 years, and five of the autopsied newborn infants were probably alive when abandoned. In two cases the newborn infants were half siblings and abandoned by the same mother. The time span from abandonment to when the newborn infant was found ranged from hours to 7 years. Two-thirds of the newborn infants were girls (66.6%). The most common means of disposal was in a plastic bag (~60%); only one newborn infant was wearing clothes when found. Causes of death were usually given as asphyxia, brain injury or simply undetermined. Two-thirds of the newborn infants showed signs of violence. None of the newborn infants had congenital malformations.
PubMed ID
21706371 View in PubMed
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The ability to reproduce the neutral zero position of the head.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50943
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H W Christensen
N. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic & Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1999 Jan;22(1):26-8
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chiropractic - instrumentation
Female
Head
Humans
Male
Posture - physiology
Range of Motion, Articular
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rotation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine how precisely asymptomatic subjects can reproduce a neutral zero position of the head. STUDY DESIGN: Repeated measures of the active cervical neutral zero position. SETTING: Institute of Medical Biology (Center of Biomechanics) at Odense University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight asymptomatic students from the University of Odense, male/female ratio 20:18 and mean age 24.3 years (range, 20 to 30 years). INTERVENTION: Measurements of the location of the neutral zero head position by use of the electrogoniometer CA-6000 Spine Motion Analyzer. Each subject's neutral zero position with eyes closed was measured 3 times. The device gives the localization of the neutral zero as coordinates in 3 dimensions (x, v, z) corresponding to the 3 motion planes. RESULTS: The mean difference from neutral zero in 3 motion planes was found to be 2.7 degrees in the sagittal plane, 1.0 degree in the horizontal plane, and 0.65 degree in the frontal plane. CONCLUSION: We found that young adult asymptomatic subjects are very good at reproducing the neutral zero position of the head. This suggests the existence of some advanced neurologic control mechanisms.
PubMed ID
10029946 View in PubMed
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Abstracts from the 16th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian Society for Head and Neck Oncology. April 23-25, 2004. Oulu, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83205
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2005 Aug;30(4):384-94
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2005 Aug;30(4):384-94
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - pathology - therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
16209693 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abstracts from the 17th Annual Meeting of the Scandinavian Society for Head and Neck Oncology. April 22-24, 2005. Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83204
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2005 Aug;30(4):394-400
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Source
Clin Otolaryngol. 2005 Aug;30(4):394-400
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology - therapy
Humans
PubMed ID
16209698 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability and concurrent validity of measures to predict older driver involvement in motor vehicle crashes: an Emergency Department pilot case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161383
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Frank J Molnar
Shawn C Marshall
Malcolm Man-Son-Hing
Keith G Wilson
Anna M Byszewski
Ian Stiell
Author Affiliation
CanDRIVE(1): a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Aging funded New Emerging Team, Elisabeth-Bruyère Research Institute, 43 Bruyère Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 5C8. fmolnar@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2007 Sep;39(5):1056-63
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Automobile Driver Examination - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Head Movements
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Mental Status Schedule - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Psychomotor Performance
Questionnaires
Reaction Time
Risk
Visual Fields
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Older drivers have one of the highest motor vehicle crash (MVC) rates per kilometer driven, largely due to the functional effects of the accumulation, and progression of age-associated medical conditions that eventually impact on fitness-to-drive. Consequently, physicians in many jurisdictions are legally mandated to report to licensing authorities patients who are judged to be medically at risk for MVCs. Unfortunately, physicians lack evidence-based tools to assess the fitness-to-drive of their older patients. This paper reports on a pilot study that examines the acceptability and association with MVC of components of a comprehensive clinical assessment battery.
To evaluate the acceptability to participants of components of a comprehensive assessment battery, and to explore potential predictors of MVC that can be employed in front-line clinical settings.
Case-control study of 10 older drivers presenting to a tertiary care hospital emergency department after involvement in an MVC and 20 age-matched controls.
The measures tested were generally found to be acceptable to participants. Positive associations (p
PubMed ID
17854579 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of tele-oncology compared with face-to-face consultation in head and neck cancer case conferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19396
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Stalfors
S. Edström
T. Björk-Eriksson
C. Mercke
J. Nyman
T. Westin
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. joacim.stalfors@orlforum.com
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(6):338-43
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case Management - organization & administration
Feasibility Studies
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Examination
Remote Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine was introduced for weekly tumour case conferences between Sahlgrenska University Hospital and two district hospitals in Sweden. The accuracy of tele-oncology was determined using simulated telemedicine consultations, in which all the material relating to each case was presented but without the patient in person. The people attending the conference were asked to determine the tumour ('TNM') classification and treatment. The patient was then presented in person, to give the audience the opportunity to ask questions and perform a physical examination. Then a new discussion regarding the tumour classification and the treatment plan took place, and the consensus was recorded. Of the 98 consecutive patients studied in this way, 80 could be evaluated by both techniques. Of these 80, 73 (91%) had the same classification and treatment plan in the telemedicine simulation as in the subsequent face-to-face consultation. In four cases the TNM classification was changed and for three patients the treatment plan was altered. The specialists also had to state their degree of confidence in the tele-oncology decisions. When they recorded uncertainty about their decision, it was generally because they wanted to palpate the tumour. In five of the seven patients with a different outcome, the clinical evaluation was stated to be dubious or not possible. The results show that telemedicine can be used safely for the management of head and neck cancers.
PubMed ID
11747635 View in PubMed
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Acetabulum-head index in children with normal hips: a radiographic study of 154 hips.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33123
Source
J Pediatr Orthop B. 1999 Oct;8(4):268-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
A. Moberg
G. Hansson
C. Kaniklides
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Hudiksvalls Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Orthop B. 1999 Oct;8(4):268-70
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - anatomy & histology - radiography
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Femur Head - anatomy & histology - radiography
Hip Joint - anatomy & histology - radiography
Humans
Male
Observer Variation
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The acetabulum-head index (AHI), which is used to assess femoral head coverage on plain radiographs, was measured in 77 children (154 hips) with normal hips aged 2 to 14 years. The mean AHI value was 94 (range, 79-114). Both the intraobserver and the interobserver reproducibility of the measurements was high. The AHI values tended to decrease with increasing age. The mean AHI minus 2 standard deviations, which was used to define the border value for subluxation of the femoral head, was 80. The authors propose that an AHI
PubMed ID
10513362 View in PubMed
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Aconsulting clinic for head and neck tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256284
Source
Manit Med Rev. 1971 May-Jun;51(3):16-7
Publication Type
Article

809 records – page 1 of 81.