Skip header and navigation

Refine By

11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Ecologic and epidemiologic analysis of allergies in children in Orenburg].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217907
Source
Gig Sanit. 1994 Jul-Aug;(7):3-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
V M Boev
O G Pavlovskaya
M N Volianik
V V Bystrykh
V F Kuksanov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1994 Jul-Aug;(7):3-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants
Child
Ecology
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Hypersensitivity - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Morbidity
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Results of study of relationship between the incidence of allergic diseases in children and the level of atmospheric air pollution in Orenburg are presented. Data of research in 1988-1993 has shown a trend to increase of atmospheric pollution by NO2, H2S, and formaldehyde. Allergic morbidity was 121.38 per 1000 children.
PubMed ID
7828947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure of hospital operating room personnel to potentially harmful environmental agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224168
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1992 Mar;53(3):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
A M Sass-Kortsak
J T Purdham
P R Bozek
J H Murphy
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1992 Mar;53(3):203-9
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hazardous Substances - analysis
Health Personnel
Hospitals
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Ontario
Operating Rooms
Radiation monitoring
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies of risk to reproductive health arising from the operating room environment have been inconclusive and lack quantitative exposure information. This study was undertaken to quantify exposure of operating room (OR) personnel to anesthetic agents, x-radiation, methyl methacrylate, and ethylene oxide and to determine how exposure varies with different operating room factors. Exposures of anesthetists and nurses to these agents were determined in selected operating rooms over three consecutive days. Each subject was asked to wear an x-radiation dosimeter for 1 month. Exposure to anesthetic agents was found to be influenced by the age of the OR facility, type of surgical service, number of procedures carried out during the day, type of anesthetic circuitry, and method of anesthesia delivery. Anesthetists were found to have significantly greater exposures than OR nurses. Exposure of OR personnel to ethylene oxide, methyl methacrylate, and x-radiation were well within existing standards. Exposure of anesthetists and nurses to anesthetic agents, at times, was in excess of Ontario exposure guidelines, despite improvements in the control of anesthetic pollution.
PubMed ID
1642173 View in PubMed
Less detail

[ Hygienic prognosis of air pollution caused by Kansko-Achinsk thermoelectric power plant emission]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49314
Source
Gig Sanit. 1993 Feb;(2):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993

[On further improvement of sanitary legislation in prevention of diseases related to dust].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142116
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(5):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
L T Elovskaia
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2010;(5):41-5
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols
Air Pollutants, Occupational
Dust
Hazardous Substances
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Workplace - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The author suggests merger of work condition classes in a classification used by Russian Consumer Protection Board to evaluate work condition by jeopardy and to certify work places in contact with primarily fibrogenic aerosols (P 2.2.2006-05, table 3, p 14)--increasing space of differences between the classes by MAC and dust load.
PubMed ID
20635546 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On prediction the hygienic standards of chemical substances having a selective action, in the atmospheric air of populated areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105623
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Sep-Oct;(5):95-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Bidevkina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Sep-Oct;(5):95-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental health
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Incidence
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
There are proposed new mathematical models for calculation the TSELs of substances with selective (with a predominant effect on the nervous system, liver and specific irritant action) or polytropic character of influence on the organism body in a single inhalation exposure. For substances with a predominant effect on the nervous system and the simultaneous effect on the kidney, liver and nervous system there was established high correlation between the TSELs and Limac.
PubMed ID
24340923 View in PubMed
Less detail

Summary of the workshop on issues in risk assessment: quantitative methods for developmental toxicology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217639
Source
Risk Anal. 1994 Aug;14(4):595-604
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
D R Mattison
J D Sandler
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261.
Source
Risk Anal. 1994 Aug;14(4):595-604
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Consumer Product Safety
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental Exposure
Forecasting
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Models, Statistical
Risk assessment
Structure-Activity Relationship
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
This report summarizes the proceedings of a conference on quantitative methods for assessing the risks of developmental toxicants. The conference was planned by a subcommittee of the National Research Council's Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology in conjunction with staff from several federal agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission, and Health and Welfare Canada. Issues discussed at the workshop included computerized techniques for hazard identification, use of human and animal data for defining risks in a clinical setting, relationships between end points in developmental toxicity testing, reference dose calculations for developmental toxicology, analysis of quantitative dose-response data, mechanisms of developmental toxicity, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, and structure-activity relationships. Although a formal consensus was not sought, many participants favored the evolution of quantitative techniques for developmental toxicology risk assessment, including the replacement of lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs) and no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) with the benchmark dose methodology.
PubMed ID
7972960 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The forecasting of hygienic regulations for industrial substances possessing irritant action].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213923
Source
Gig Sanit. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
A B Nurgabylova
D A Filimonov
V V Poroikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 1995 Nov-Dec;(6):16-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Computer simulation
Forecasting - methods
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Irritants - toxicity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Models, Statistical
Regression Analysis
Russia
United States
Abstract
Computer analysis of hygienic standards in Russia and the USA and of the toxicometric parameters of chemicals characterized by predominantly irritating effects helped create a prognostic model for the calculation of maximum allowable concentrations of chemicals in the air of working zones.
PubMed ID
8666300 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.