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15 records – page 1 of 2.

[Acute chemical poisoning of humans as a medico-ecological problem].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210154
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(2):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
N N Litvinov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(2):1-7
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Ecology
Environmental Pollutants - poisoning
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
International Cooperation
Pesticides - poisoning
Poison Control Centers
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
Anthropogenic acute chemical exposures have become an important socioeconomic and environmental factor on the national, regional and global level. They present an actual or potential danger to vital activity and health of large population groups and normal operation of the Biosphere and natural components. Hence a problem of prevention and elimination of acute technogenic exposures hazardous for human health has expanded beyond the medical competence and grown to a major environmental issue.
PubMed ID
9156767 View in PubMed
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[Administration of essential phospholipids in persons exposed to chemical industrial pollutants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180414
Source
Ter Arkh. 2004;76(2):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
L A Shpagina
S V Bobrov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2004;76(2):63-6
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Occupational Diseases - drug therapy - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phosphatidylcholines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Poisoning - drug therapy - etiology
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine efficacy of the drug essliver-forte in patients with chronic intoxication by a complex of such toxicants as soluble and unsoluble compounds of uranium, lead and mercury.
The examination of bilirubin, synthesis of proteins and enzyme production by the liver, activity of free radical lipid oxidation and antioxidant defence was conducted in 42 persons (mean age 66.4 +/- 4.2 years) occupationally exposed to chemicals (compounds of uranium, lead and mercury) for 12.6 +/- 1.8 years. The patients were divided into two equal groups: patients of group 1 received standard therapy with enterosorbents, cerebral angioprotectors and alpha-tocopherol; patients of group 2 instead of alpha-tocopherol were given essliver-forte (2 capsules twice a day).
Patients of group 2 had significantly less frequent complaints for fatigue, anxiety, dyspnea, sleep disorders; improvement was observed in peripheral blood counts, in concentrations of alpha 2- and gamma-globulins, sulfhydril and catalase activity of erythrocytes; transaminase activity and intensity of saponin hemolysis went down.
Essliver-forte is effective in persons occupationally exposed to chemicals.
PubMed ID
15106419 View in PubMed
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Contacts with out-of-hours services because of poisonings in Norway 2006?-?15.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287489
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 06 27;137(12-13):876-880
Publication Type
Article
Date
06-27-2017
Author
Hogne Sandvik
Steinar Hunskår
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 06 27;137(12-13):876-880
Date
06-27-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
After-Hours Care - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Overdose - epidemiology
Female
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Poisoning - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Poisonings constitute a serious health problem in Norway. The objective of the study was to analyse cases of poisoning reported to out-of-hours services and any changes that may have occurred over a ten-year period.
The material consists of reimbursement claims from all doctors on out-of-hours duty in Norway in the period 2006???15. Poisonings were defined as ICPC diagnostic codes A84 (poisoning by medical agent), A86 (toxic effect non-medicinal substance) or P16 (acute alcohol abuse).
The contact rate due to poisonings increased from 221 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2006 to 297 per 100 000 inhabitants in 2015. For the age group 1???2 years, the contact rate per 100 000 inhabitants dropped from 469 to 223, for the age group 15???25 it rose from 523 to 719, and for the age group 53???59 it rose from 178 to 339. The highest contact rate was found among women aged 15???25 (785 per 100 000 inhabitants). This group also had the highest contact rate caused by poisoning by a medical agent (238 per 100 000 inhabitants). In the age group 15???25 years, altogether 63% of the poisonings occurred during the night.
The frequency of contact with out-of-hours services because of poisoning is generally increasing, although a strong decline is observed among small children. Adolescents, and young women in particular, stand out in suffering frequent cases of poisoning.
PubMed ID
28655268 View in PubMed
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Emerging public health issues in Alaska: occupational and environmental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4365
Source
Alaska Med. 1989 May-Jun;31(3):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
L D Weiss
J M Booker
D. Wigglesworth
Source
Alaska Med. 1989 May-Jun;31(3):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Alaska
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Hazardous Waste - prevention & control
Humans
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Abstract
The principal purpose of this article is to examine selected Alaskan occupational and environmental health problems and associated issues. Specifically, we focus on two traditional areas of interest in occupational and environmental health: 1) Job-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, and 2) accidental spills and uncontrolled waste sites involving hazardous materials. In 1986 the Alaska Department of Labor reported 13,154 recordable occupational injuries and illnesses among workers in the private sector. The injury rate for private sector workers was 10.2 cases per 100, compared to a rate of 7.9 for the U.S. private sector as a whole. There are approximately 550 known hazardous waste sites in Alaska identified by military, other federal, or state sources. One study documents 1,330 hazardous materials incidents in Alaska during a one year period. Effective public health policy for these occupational and environmental health hazards requires the development of an adequate database and a specific plan of action for the future.
PubMed ID
2669551 View in PubMed
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[Inquiries to the Norwegian Poisons Information Centre on acute exposures to chemicals and chemical products]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86896
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Apr 17;128(8):924-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2008
Author
Borgeraas Jan
Lindqvist Ragnhild
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for giftinformasjon (Giftinformasjonen) Sosial- og helsedirektoratet, Postboks 7000, St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Apr 17;128(8):924-8
Date
Apr-17-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Fossil Fuels - poisoning
Glycols - poisoning
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Household Products - poisoning
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poison Control Centers - statistics & numerical data
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Poisons Information Centre receives many inquiries about acute exposures to chemical products. Our aim was to characterise the frequency and severity of such exposures and to raise awareness of chemicals that rarely cause poisoning, but may lead to serious systemic toxicity even in small amounts. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were collected from inquiries to the Poisons Information Centre in the period 2004-2006 and from the Product Register on the use of selected chemicals. RESULTS: In 2004-2006, the Poisons Information Centre received 35,802 inquiries regarding acute exposures to chemicals or chemical products. Most of the exposures (72%) were assessed as non-toxic or involving risk of minor poisoning, while only 7.8% were assessed as involving risk of severe poisoning. The substances most frequently involved were cleaning agents, cosmetics/personal care products and hydrocarbon fuels, whereas risk of severe poisoning is related to alkali and hydrocarbon exposures. Poisonings with hydrofluoric acid and glycols/glycol ethers are rare, but the outcome is often severe. As many as 84% of the hydrofluoric acid exposures and 36% of the ingestions of ethylene glycol by children were assessed as involving risk of moderate or severe poisoning. INTERPRETATION: Exposure to chemicals or chemical products is frequent, but rarely leads to severe poisonings. Data from inquiries to the Poisons Information Centre are representative of the chemical exposure conditions. It is important to have detailed product information readily available to assure correct treatment after exposure incidents.
PubMed ID
18431415 View in PubMed
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Neurobehavioral tests as a medical surveillance procedure: applying evaluative criteria.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209933
Source
Environ Res. 1997;73(1-2):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
S. Guirguis
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Ontario, M71 1T7, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 1997;73(1-2):63-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior - drug effects
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
Nervous System - drug effects
Neuropsychological Tests
Occupational Exposure
Ontario
Abstract
Neurobehavioral impairment is among the earliest indicators of a toxic insult on the nervous system. Neurobehavioral tests measure behavior impairment by noninvasive procedures that assess various performance and personality changes. Neurobehavioral tests have been used on groups of workers included in epidemiologic research studies; however, their suitability for an ongoing medical surveillance program for workers exposed to neurotoxic agents has not been evaluated. In Ontario, Canada, a set of validity criteria must be met to determine whether a medical procedure may be prescribed for a specific medical surveillance program. The evaluative criteria are standards for judging the desirability of a procedure based on social values and scientific considerations. In this paper, various studies using neurobehavioral tests are reviewed, and the validity of using these procedures for medical surveillance is evaluated by applying the Ontario evaluation criteria. The conclusion is that neurobehavioral tests are useful for well-controlled, cross-sectional studies, but they do not yet meet the validity criteria for procedures prescribed in an ongoing medical surveillance program for workers exposed to neurotoxic agents.
PubMed ID
9311531 View in PubMed
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[New demands in future when it comes to competence in emergency medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200205
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Oct 27;96(43):4638-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-27-1999

Occupational and environmental exposures among Alaska Native and American Indian people living in Alaska and the Southwest United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124334
Source
J Environ Health. 2012 May;74(9):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Diana Redwood
Anne P Lanier
Michael Brubaker
Laurie Orell
Lillian Tom-Orme
Carmen George
Sandra Edwards
Martha Slattery
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Concortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. dredwood@anthc.org
Source
J Environ Health. 2012 May;74(9):22-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Asbestos - poisoning
Chemical Hazard Release - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Pesticides - poisoning
Petroleum - toxicity
Silver
Southwestern United States - epidemiology
Welding
Young Adult
Abstract
Most occupational and environmental research describes associations between specific occupational and environmental hazards and health outcomes, with little information available on population-level exposure, especially among unique subpopulations. The authors describe the prevalence of self-reported lifetime exposure to nine occupational and environmental hazards among 11,326 American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adults enrolled in the Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study in the Southwest U.S. and Alaska. The top three hazards experienced by AI/AN people in Alaska were petroleum products, military chemicals, and asbestos. The top three hazards experienced by AI/AN living in the Southwest U.S. were pesticides, petroleum, and welding/silversmithing. The study described here found that male sex, lower educational attainment, AI/AN language use, and living in the Southwest U.S. (vs. Alaska) were all associated with an increased likelihood of hazard exposure. The authors' study provides baseline data to facilitate future exposure-response analyses. Future studies should measure dose and duration as well as environmental hazards that occur in community settings.
PubMed ID
22590848 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.