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111 records – page 1 of 12.

[A case study of the contents of radionuclides and of main chemical pollutants in the atmospheric air of Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184554
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):19-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
I P Korenkov
O S Chapkovich
P A Briukhanov
F I Pasechnik
N K Shandala
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 May-Jun;(3):19-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Public Health
Russia
Abstract
The article contains data on monitoring the atmospheric air pollution in Moscow. Thus, the below figures are presented: beta ranges from 2.6 E-0.5 to 5.7 E-0.04 Bk/m3, airborne pollutants amount to 3-80 mkg/m3, sulfates--0.002-1.58 mkg(S)/m3, nitrates--0.05-0.75 mkg(N2)/m3 ammonium ions--0.12-1.20 mkg (N2)/m3, sulfuric dioxides--0.11-1.20 mkg (S)/m3. nitric dioxides--0.05-0.5 mlg (N2)/m3 and nitric acid--0.01-0.08 mkg (N2)/m3. The concentration of airborne pollutants exceeds the regional European level (22 mkg/m3) and that of Russia's European part (12 ... 28 mkg/m3) approximately by 1.5 times. It is noteworthy that it reaches 50 ... 70 mkg/m3 in large industrial centers of Europe. The share of sulfuric and nitric acids in the total concentration of airborne pollutants is (by weight) 13%. 0.8 g of sulfur per m2/year and 0.34 g of nitrogen per m2/year fall in the area of Sport-and-Recreation Complex No. 3 with precipitations; the average total beta-activity of atmospheric precipitations amounts to 1.2 Bk/m2 per day. An analysis of relationships between the air dustiness, the ashes samples' weight (of the air) and cuvette (precipitations) is indicative of their direct and tense correlation: the correlation coefficient between dust and ashes samples is 0.716, and between dust and ashes samples of cuvettes--0.559. At the same time, an extremely weak correlation should be pointed out between air dustiness and the total beta-activity of samples--the correlation coefficient is 0.184 (during a warm year season), as well as between dustiness and the beta-activity of cuvettes--0.346.
PubMed ID
12852032 View in PubMed
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[Adaptive immune response of people living near chemically hazardous object].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127016
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2011 Oct;332(10):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
S V Petlenko
M B Ivanov
Iu B Goverdovskii
E G Bogdanova
A V Golubkov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2011 Oct;332(10):15-23
Date
Oct-2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Male
Russia
Time Factors
Abstract
The article presents data dynamics of adaptive immune responses of people for a long time living in adverse environmental conditions caused by pollution of the environment by industrial toxic waste. It is shown that in the process of adaptation to adverse environmental factors, changes in the immune system are in the phase fluctuations of immunological parameters that are accompanied by changes in the structure of immunodependent pathology. Most sensitive to prolonged exposure to toxic compounds are the cellular mechanisms of immune protection. Violations of the structural and quantitative and functional parameters of the link of the immune system are leading to the formation of immunopathological processes.
PubMed ID
22332391 View in PubMed
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Airway symptoms and lung function among male workers in an area polluted from an oil tank explosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267816
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Stein Håkon Låstad Lygre
Cecilie Svanes
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):953-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Explosions
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Petroleum - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory System
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess whether working in an industrial harbor where an oil tank exploded was associated with more airway symptoms and lower lung function in men 1.5 years later.
In a cross-sectional study of 180 men, 18 to 67 years old, airway symptoms and lung function among men who worked in the industrial harbor at the time of the explosion was compared with those of working men with residence more than 20 km away. Regression analyses are adjusted for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, recent infection, and age.
Exposed men had significantly more upper (ORirritated nose = 2.89 [95% confidence interval = 1.31 to 6.37]) and lower (ORdyspnea uphill = 3.79 [95% confidence interval = 1.69 to 8.46]) airway symptoms, and some indication of more reversible airway obstruction than unexposed workers.
Men working in an area with an oil tank explosion had more airway symptoms and indication of more airway obstruction 1.5 years after the event.
PubMed ID
25153304 View in PubMed
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[Alternative methodologies for standardization of deleterious environmental factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183949
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
P G Tkachev
A A Liapkalo
I P L'gova
V N Riabchikov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):45-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - standards
Conservation of Natural Resources - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Illness - etiology - prevention & control
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Russia
Abstract
Some ecologists propose in recent papers to replace the ideology of the maximum allowable concentrations (MAC) by a new biotic concept of regional environmental monitoring by the method of ecologically allowable levels (EAL). By comparing the basic provisions of MAC and EAL methodologies, by taking into account their advantages and disadvantages, the authors conclude that there is no alternative to the hygienic MAC concept. The principles of EAL substantiation have no well-grounded scientific-and-practical methodology. New concepts of the common control of environmental quality, the health status of man, animals, plants, and the microworld should be sought by using the existing regulations.
PubMed ID
12934287 View in PubMed
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An analytical approach for reducing workplace health hazards through substitution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222006
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1993 Jan;54(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
G. Goldschmidt
Author Affiliation
Ballerup BST Center, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1993 Jan;54(1):36-43
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Support Techniques
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Organizational Culture
Abstract
Substitution for a harmful chemical implies that the desired function is maintained without using the harmful chemical in question. Improvement can be achieved if a less harmful chemical can be used or the same function obtained by changing the process and eliminating the harmful chemical agent. In 1982, Denmark introduced an authority regulation requiring substitution if functional and economical alternatives exist. This paper summarizes the results of 162 examples of substitution investigated by the Danish Occupational Health Services. The identification and implementation of substitution alternatives is described as an iterative process with seven distinct steps. Several tools that are useful in evaluating alternatives are described, including Hansen solubility parameters and vapor hazard ratios. In addition to the technical issues surrounding substitution, this paper describes the social interactions necessary to include all affected individuals, along with those having the proper expertise in the decision-making process. The use of the described methods may result in a safer work-place by eliminating certain hazardous chemicals or practices that have historically been used in specific industries.
PubMed ID
8470622 View in PubMed
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An ecological study of industry in a high-risk region of multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130644
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
Inger Boström
Anne-Marie Landtblom
Klaus Lauer
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clincal and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience, Linköping, University, Linköping, Sweden. inger.bostrom@kristinehamn.se
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2011 Dec 15;311(1-2):50-7
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The county of Värmland, Sweden, has shown a high frequency of multiple sclerosis in several investigations. It has been presented in three studies; a period prevalence study in 1925-1934, a mortality study during 1952-1992 and a prevalence investigation in 2002. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of industry in this high-risk area for multiple sclerosis. The three investigations were correlated with industry in 1913 and in the 1950s, all analyzed by the Kruskall-Wallis test. Select industries from wood-pulp, paper and iron/mechanical sectors were tested also in whole Sweden. The Spearman rank correlation was used for these data and forestry data in Värmland. In Värmland, industrial data from 1913 revealed that large sawmills were associated with the period prevalence in 1925-1934 and there was a possible correlation with the prevalence for 2002. Wood-pulp factories showed a possible association with the prevalence 1925-1934 and the mortality 1952-1992. Some industries in the 1950s were correlated with the prevalence 2002. Wood and paper industries in Sweden 1913 showed an association with the MS mortality 1952-1992. In summary, data on MS prevalence in Värmland and mortality both in Värmland and all Sweden from the past 100 years suggest an association with wood-related industries in 1913 and in the 1950s, whereas no consistent association was found for other industries.
PubMed ID
21982618 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to evaluation of translocated pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192070
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(11):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
O V Mitrokhin
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(11):23-8
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors suggested criteria of translocated pollution: scale, intensity, jeopardy, with consideration of dissemination mechanism--aerodynamic, water migration, terminal. The article covers classification of translocated pollution. Using methodology of risk evaluation, the authors assessed additional morbidity cases due to translocated pollution.
PubMed ID
11768950 View in PubMed
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Art-related health hazards: artists should be put in picture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231078
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Mar 15;140(6):702-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1989
Author
J. Harrison
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Mar 15;140(6):702-3
Date
Mar-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health Education - methods
Humans
Ontario
PubMed ID
2920344 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of human health risk due to environmental pollution in the city of Orsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180125
Source
Gig Sanit. 2004 Mar-Apr;(2):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
L G Kon'shina
M V Sergeeva
L L Lipanova
A V Solonin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2004 Mar-Apr;(2):22-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental Illness - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health status
Humans
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The established tense ecological situation in the town of Orsk presents a serious human threat. The use of methods for assessing the risk has allowed the authors to determine the values of carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risks. Due to the influence of all environments polluted by industrial emissions, the total annual carcinogenic risk is 2.31 cases for the adult population of the town and 0.49 for its children. The greatest carcinogenic risk is associated with arsenic in water and foodstuffs, hexavalent chromium, cadmium, and formaldehyde in the air. The high concentrations of dust, phenol, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon oxide cause a major damage to human health. The established specific values of this risk are of relative significance.
PubMed ID
15141622 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of real risk of urban chemical exposure to the population's health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159621
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Nov-Dec;(6):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
A G Malysheva
E G Rastiannikov
A A Bezzubov
N Iu Kozlova
I N Lutsevich
E E Kublanov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 Nov-Dec;(6):17-20
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health status
Humans
Public Health
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Improving the chemoanalytical quality control of the urban environment requires transition from the assessment considering only certain things determined by target analyses to the comprehensive assessment based on monitoring with the identification of the maximally complete spectra of substances contained in the environmental objects and coming from the sources of pollution, by using the appropriate algorithm; identification, quantifying a spectrum of pollutants as completely as possible; selection of the leading indices, by evaluating the detected composition of pollutions from the degree of their hygienic significance, by taking into account a set of criteria (detection rate, concentrations, group affiliation, specificity for a nearby source of pollution in the check of drinking water, a capacity for transformation, possible formation of more toxic transformation products); and monitoring through target tests by the chosen leading indices.
PubMed ID
18161183 View in PubMed
Less detail

111 records – page 1 of 12.