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[Biologic prophylaxis of intoxications with inorganic compounds].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177176
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(9):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
B A Katsnel'son
T D Degtiareva
L I Privalova
O L Malykh
V B Gurvich
S V Kuz'min
O Iu Beresneva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(9):19-23
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Inorganic Chemicals - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
The authors summarize theoretical principles of increasing human resistence to toxic effects of inorganic compounds polluting occupational environment and habitat, exemplify practical use of this prophylactic trend.
PubMed ID
15568564 View in PubMed
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Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2002;(9):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
B A Katsnel'son
A A Koseleva
S V Kuz'min
L I Privalova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2002;(9):29-34
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Dioxins - adverse effects
Environmental pollution
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Reference Values
Russia
Abstract
Dioxins and dioxin-like substances are highly toxic and extremely dangerous chemical compounds. Dioxins are formed during the thermal process associated with the use of chlorine. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-1,4-dioxin is the most toxic, the most typical and well-studied agent. The most characteristic and constant indicators of intoxication with dioxin-containing substances are altered body weight, chloracne, hepatic damage, thyroid involution, structural changes in the adrenal cortex, spleen, genitals, immunodeficiency. There is evidence for a role of these agents in the development of infertility and neonatal pathology.
PubMed ID
12380282 View in PubMed
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[The umbilical blood levels of lead and some other toxic metals as a biomarker of environment-induced exposure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162242
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):68-70
Publication Type
Article
Author
L I Privalova
O L Malykh
G V Matiukhina
S V Gnezdilova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):68-70
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Hazardous Substances - analysis
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis - toxicity
Metals - analysis - toxicity
Pregnancy
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Groups of pregnant women, which made up in Revda, Pervouralsk, Krasnouralsk, and Verkh-Isetsky District of Yekaterinburg, were studied. Tests of umbilical blood samples (UB) for the levels of calcium, iron, chromium, manganese, zinc, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury have established that the mean concentration of lead and the proportion of samples with elevated UB lead concentrations depend on how close the residential area is located to the major industrial source of emission of this toxic metal into ambient air. This correlation is less marked for other metals or it is not found. The particular position of lead is likely to be explained by the fact that it is entirely foreign to an organism and by the comparative unimportance of a contribution of the sources of exposure to this metal, which are unassociated with man-caused environmental and food pollution. As far as other metals are concerned, the situation is complicated by the fact that they are not only toxic, but when upon minor exposures, also essential biotrace elements with controlled and interdependent toxic kinetics. It is also shown that when a pregnant woman takes a complex of biological protectors promoting a reduction in her body's levels of lead, its concentrations in her body, its UB concentration is much lower than such a bioprophylactic effect is absent.
PubMed ID
17658049 View in PubMed
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