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[The agent used to free the hostages in Moscow and the insufficient Dutch preparations in case of a terrorist chemical disaster].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187087
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2002 Dec 14;146(50):2396-401
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2002
Author
L H D J Booij
Author Affiliation
Universitair Medisch Centrum St Radboud, afd. Anesthesiologie, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen. l.booij@anes.umcn.nl
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2002 Dec 14;146(50):2396-401
Date
Dec-14-2002
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Warfare
Chemical Warfare Agents - adverse effects
Decontamination - instrumentation - methods
Disaster planning
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Gases
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Humans
Netherlands
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Russia
Terrorism - prevention & control
Abstract
In its attempt to liberate the hostages in Moscow, the government used a gas or vapour. Classical war gases are not appropriate for such a task because they cause irreparable damage, while inhalation anaesthetics are inappropriate because they take too long to take effect, and because hundreds of litres would have been required for a sufficient effect. Following the liberation of the hostages, it was reported that a fentanyl derivative had been used, most likely carfentanyl. From the way that the hostages, in Moscow were liberated, it is clear that terrorist attacks in which chemicals are used may also take place in the future in the Netherlands. In order to be able to react adequately to such situations, additional training for physicians and other health-care personnel is urgently necessary and the hospitals must also be better prepared for this task, especially for the artificial respiration of large numbers of patients and for the administration of large amounts of antidote in easy-to-use dosage units. From now on, on-site treatment and stabilisation will not be reserved only for trauma cases.
PubMed ID
12518514 View in PubMed
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