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The Ahalaya case-management program for HIV-infected American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians: quantitative and qualitative evaluation of impacts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2999
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
P D Bouey
B E Druan
Author Affiliation
The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, 436 14th Street, Suite 1020, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Paulbouey@nnaapc.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Case Management - organization & administration
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Hawaii - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - standards
Abstract
The Ahalaya case management model was designed to provide culturally sensitive services to HIV-positive American Indians (AI), Alaska Natives (AN), and Native Hawaiians (NH). This program started in 1991 and expanded across the country in 1994. The evaluation plan included a client satisfaction survey, along with focus groups and key informant interviews. Of the 389 active clients enrolled, 132 responded to the anonymous 35-item questionnaire. Responses were favorable regarding benefits of the programs. Self-reported quality of life changes after enrollment also were significantly improved (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: T=6.87, p=.000; n=131). Qualitative data highlighted other important issues. Social relationships-with staff, community, and family-were critical to client welfare, as a source of both strength and fear. While AI/AN/NH case management programs have been shown effective, services need to expand, and they have to facilitate resolutions to problems in clients social relationships.
PubMed ID
11279557 View in PubMed
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Anchorage, Alaska and Honolulu, Hawaii: seasonal differences in demand for counseling services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241755
Source
Alaska Med. 1983 Jul-Sep;25(3):79-80
Publication Type
Article

An international comparison of cancer survival: metropolitan Toronto, Ontario, and Honolulu, Hawaii.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196369
Source
Am J Public Health. 2000 Dec;90(12):1866-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
K M Gorey
E J Holowaty
G. Fehringer
E. Laukkanen
N L Richter
C M Meyer
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. gorey@uwindsor.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2000 Dec;90(12):1866-72
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Hawaii - epidemiology
Health Benefit Plans, Employee - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Quality of Health Care
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Universal Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Comparisons of cancer survival in Canadian and US metropolitan areas have shown consistent Canadian advantages. This study tests a health insurance hypothesis by comparing cancer survival in Toronto, Ontario, and Honolulu, Hawaii.
Ontario and Hawaii registries provided a total of 9190 and 2895 cancer cases (breast and prostate, 1986-1990, followed until 1996). Socioeconomic data for each person's residence at the time of diagnosis were taken from population censuses.
Socioeconomic status and cancer survival were directly associated in the US cohort, but not in the Canadian cohort. Compared with similar patients in Honolulu, residents of low-income areas in Toronto experienced 5-year survival advantages for breast and prostate cancer. In support of the health insurance hypothesis, between-country differences were smaller than those observed with other state samples and the Canadian advantage was larger among younger women.
Hawaii seems to provide better cancer care than many other states, but patients in Toronto still enjoy a significant survival advantage. Although Hawaii's employer-mandated health insurance coverage seems an effective step toward providing equitable health care, even better care could be expected with a universally accessible, single-payer system.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11111258 View in PubMed
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Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268526
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9573-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2014
Author
Reggie S Spaulding
Michael D DeGrandpre
James C Beck
Robert D Hart
Brittany Peterson
Eric H De Carlo
Patrick S Drupp
Terry R Hammar
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9573-81
Date
Aug-19-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon - analysis
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Colorimetry - methods
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Hawaii
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Oceans and Seas
Oregon
Reproducibility of Results
Seawater - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 µmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 µmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.
PubMed ID
25051401 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer screening among American Samoan women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193858
Source
Prev Med. 2001 Jul;33(1):9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
S I Mishra
P H Luce
F A Hubbell
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Policy and Research, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Irvine, California 92697-5800, USA. simishra@uci.edu
Source
Prev Med. 2001 Jul;33(1):9-17
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
American Samoa - epidemiology
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Female
Hawaii - epidemiology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Los Angeles - epidemiology
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Samoa - ethnology
Abstract
Little is known about breast cancer screening practices or predictors of age-specific screening for Samoan women.
Through systematic, random sampling procedures, we identified and interviewed 720 adult (> or =30 years) Samoan women residing in American Samoa, Hawaii, and Los Angeles. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to determine independent predictors for recent age-specific screening.
Only 55.6% of women (> or =30 years) had ever had a CBE and 32.9% of women (> or =40 years) had ever had a mammogram. Furthermore, only 24.4 and 22.4% of Samoan women (> or =40 years) residing in Hawaii and Los Angeles, respectively, had an age-specific mammogram within the prior year. Independent predictors of age-specific CBE screening included age, education, health insurance, ambulatory visit, and being a resident of Hawaii or Los Angeles; those for mammography included ambulatory visit and awareness of screening guidelines.
Population-based estimates of age-specific breast cancer screening among Samoan women are lower than the national objectives and those reported for other minorities. Targeted efforts that address doctor-patient communication on preventive behavior, improved access to health care services (especially in American Samoa), and focused educational awareness programs are needed to improve the dismal screening rates observed in this indigenous population.
PubMed ID
11482991 View in PubMed
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Brief communication: variation in the frequency and form of the lower permanent molar middle trigonid crest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221009
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1993 Jun;91(2):245-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
L. Wu
C G Turner
Author Affiliation
Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Academia Sinica, Beijing, China.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1993 Jun;91(2):245-8
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
China
Continental Population Groups
Dentition
Europe
Hawaii
Hominidae - anatomy & histology
Humans
Melanesia
Molar - anatomy & histology
North America
Observer Variation
South Africa
Abstract
The frequency and form of the middle trigonid crest (MTC) in lower permanent molars is reported for 1,131 dental casts of Bushman (San), Bantu, Solomons, Hawaiians, Pima, Eskimo, Navajo, Chinese, and American whites. The MTC occurs most often on the first molar. We found very little intra-trait variation, so observations were scored on a present-absent basis. The MTC is most frequent in the African samples and rare in those of the other populations. Two reference plaques can be obtained to add to the existing series in the ASU dental anthropology system.
PubMed ID
8317565 View in PubMed
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Building Native Hawaiian capacity in cancer research and programming. A legacy of 'Imi Hale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167484
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 15;107(8 Suppl):2082-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006
Author
Kathryn L Braun
Joann U Tsark
LorrieAnn Santos
Nia Aitaoto
Clayton Chong
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
Source
Cancer. 2006 Oct 15;107(8 Suppl):2082-90
Date
Oct-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Community Networks - organization & administration
Hawaii - ethnology
Health education
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
In 2000, cancer health indicators for Native Hawaiians were worse than those of other ethnic groups in Hawai'i, and Native Hawaiians were under-represented in research endeavors. To build capacity to reduce cancer health disparities, 'Imi Hale applied principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and empowerment theory. Strategies included: 1) engaging Native Hawaiians in defining cancer priorities; 2) developing culturally appropriate processes and products; 3) supplementing primary and secondary cancer prevention activities; 4) offering skills training and technical assistance; and 5) providing an infrastructure to support culturally appropriate research. Between 2000 and 2005, 'Imi Hale involved more than 8000 Native Hawaiians in education, training, and primary and secondary prevention activities; developed 24 culturally tailored educational products (brochures, curricula, and self-help kits); secured $1.1 million in additional program and research funds; trained 98 indigenous researchers, 79 of whom worked on research projects; and engaged more than 3000 other Native Hawaiians as research participants and advisors. Evidence of empowerment was seen in increased individual competence, enhanced community capacity and participation, reduced barriers, and improved supports to address cancer in Hawaiian communities. Operationalizing CBPR and empowerment requires a commitment to involving as many people as possible, addressing community priorities, following cultural protocol, developing and transferring skills, and supporting an infrastructure to reduce barriers and build supports to sustain change. This approach is time consuming, but necessary for building competence and capacity, especially in indigenous and minority communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.
PubMed ID
16977599 View in PubMed
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Cancer among indigenous populations. The experience of American Samoans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210992
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1553-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1996
Author
S I Mishra
P H Luce-Aoelua
L R Wilkens
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine 92697-5800, USA.
Source
Cancer. 1996 Oct 1;78(7 Suppl):1553-7
Date
Oct-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
American Samoa - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups
Female
Hawaii - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
Little is known about the cancer control needs of American Samoans. This report provides some of the first data on cancer incidence among American Samoans in Hawaii.
The Hawaii Tumor Registry, a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based, active cancer surveillance program, provided archival data on American Samoans residing in Hawaii and on those referred to Hawaii for diagnosis and treatment from the U.S. Territory of American Samoa.
In American Samoan males, the more commonly encountered cancers included cancer of the lung, prostate, stomach and liver, and leukemia. In American Samoans females, breast carcinoma was most frequent, followed by cancer of the corpus uteri, cervix uteri and thyroid, and leukemia. Females were more likely than males to receive a diagnosis of cancer at an early age: 34.5% of females and 19.9% of males with cancer were diagnosed when they were between the ages of 0 and 44 years. Males were more likely than females to be diagnosed with cancer after metastasis had occurred (45% vs. 33.9%). Compared with other Polynesians (i.e., Western Samoans and Hawaiians), American Samoan males have a relatively higher frequency of lung, prostate, thyroid, and liver cancers and a lower frequency of colon and rectum cancers. American Samoan females, compared with other Polynesians, have a higher frequency of leukemia and corpus uteri, thyroid, and pancreatic cancers and a lower frequency of colon and rectum cancers.
The data provide baseline information that has important public health and research implications for cancer control programs for this population.
PubMed ID
8839569 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in Caucasians living in the Pacific Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238042
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1985 Dec;69:65-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
A. McTiernan
J. Chu
D B Thomas
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1985 Dec;69:65-72
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Australia
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
British Columbia
California
Demography
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - epidemiology
Hawaii
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
New Zealand
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Washington
Abstract
Variations in cancer incidence among whites in 1973-77 in 8 geographic areas of the Pacific Basin were compared. Substantial differences were found for the occurrences of lung cancer, cancer of the corpus uteri, and malignant melanoma. White women living in New Zealand and Australia had the lowest risk of developing lung cancer, whereas white men living in the western United States had the highest risk. Cancer of the corpus uteri occurred more commonly in the western United States than elsewhere in the Pacific Basin. Geographic areas located closest to the equator experienced the highest incidence of malignant melanoma. In all areas, the incidence rates of cancers of the lung and corpus uteri and malignant melanoma increased significantly between 1960-66 and 1973-77; after the mid-1970s, rates of cancer of the corpus uteri declined. The incidence of stomach cancer decreased in all areas. Although cervical cancer decreased in incidence over time for most women, it increased noticeably in young women. The incidence of breast cancer also rose during the 17-year period. In at least 1 geographic area, the observed increases in breast cancer incidence were confined to women under age 40.
PubMed ID
3834348 View in PubMed
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130 records – page 1 of 13.