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178 records – page 1 of 18.

Aboriginal community alcohol harm reduction policy (ACAHRP) project: a vision for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159852
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Louis Gliksman
Margaret Rylett
Ronald R Douglas
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention & Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, London, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. louis_gliksman@camh.net
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Ownership
Population Groups
Abstract
Four First Nation communities in Ontario, Canada, formulated alcohol management policies between 1992 and 1994. An alcohol management policy is a local control option to manage alcohol use in recreation and leisure areas. Survey results indicate that decreases in alcohol use-related problems related to intoxication, nuisance behaviors, criminal activity, liquor license violations, and personal harm were perceived to have occurred. Furthermore, having policy regulations in place did not have an adverse effect on facility rentals. Band administrators and facility staff in each community felt the policy had had a positive effect on events at which alcohol was sold or served.
PubMed ID
18075913 View in PubMed
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About harm reduction in the context of the response to HIV/AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177454
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2004 Aug;9(2):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004

[Acceptability of harm reduction interventions: contributions of members of the population to the debate about public health ethics].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152246
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Eve Dubé
Raymond Massé
Lina Noël
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Québec. eve.dube@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):24-8
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Drug Users - psychology
Female
Government Programs - ethics
Harm Reduction - ethics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - ethics
Public Health - ethics
Public Opinion
Quebec
Social Control Policies - ethics
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore convergence and divergence in ethical stances of public health and of members of the population regarding acceptability of harm reduction interventions, in particular needle exchange programs.
Forty-nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with French-speaking residents of Quebec City. Content analysis was done to explore the views of the respondents with regard to injection drug users (IDUs) and interventions addressed to them, as well as Quebec policies on harm reduction.
Four main categories of social representations about IDUs have emerged from the discourses of the respondents. IDU were represented as: suffering from a disease (n = 17); victim of a situation that they could not control (n = 14); having chosen to use drugs (n = 12); or delinquent people (n = 6). Those social representations were associated with different ethical stances regarding acceptability of harm reduction interventions. Main divergences between respondents' ethical positions on harm reduction and public health discourses were related to the value of tolerance and its limits.
The Quebec City population interviewed in this study had a high level of tolerance regarding needle distribution to drug addicts. Applied ethics could be a useful way to understand citizens' interpretation of public health interventions.
PubMed ID
19263971 View in PubMed
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Access to harm reduction services in Atlantic Canada: implications for non-urban residents who inject drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130910
Source
Health Place. 2012 Mar;18(2):152-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
J. Parker
L. Jackson
M. Dykeman
J. Gahagan
J. Karabanow
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, 6230 South St., Halifax, Canada. parkerj@dal.ca
Source
Health Place. 2012 Mar;18(2):152-62
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atlantic Ocean
Canada
Female
Harm Reduction
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Needle-Exchange Programs
Rural Population
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Abstract
Awareness of drug use in rural communities and small towns has been growing, but we know relatively little about the challenges injection drug users (IDUs) living in such places face in accessing harm reduction services. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 115 IDUs in urban and non-urban areas of Atlantic Canada. In many instances, geographic distance to a needle exchange program (NEP) meant that individuals living outside of urban areas and who were not provided services through an NEP's outreach program were at a disadvantage in terms of an array of supports offered through many NEPs. These include access to free clean injecting equipment, and such ancillary services as clothing, food, referrals, information and social support. The integration of the services and approaches provided by NEPs into mainstream health services in non-urban places is one possible model for improving such access.
PubMed ID
21955638 View in PubMed
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Adverse events are common on the intensive care unit: results from a structured record review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124542
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 Sep;56(8):959-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
L. Nilsson
A. Pihl
M. Tågsjö
E. Ericsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Drug Research, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. lena.nilsson@lio.se
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012 Sep;56(8):959-65
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Harm Reduction
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Longevity
Male
Medical Errors
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Intensive care is advanced and highly technical, and it is essential that, despite this, patient care remains safe and of high quality. Adverse events (AEs) are supposed to be reported to internal quality control systems by health-care providers, but many are never reported. Patients on the intensive care unit (ICU) are at special risk for AEs. Our aim was to identify the incidence and characteristics of AEs in patients who died on the ICU during a 2-year period.
A structured record review according to the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) was used to review charts from patients cared for at the ICU of a middle-sized Swedish hospital during 2007 and 2008 and who died during or immediately after ICU care. All identified AEs were scored according to severity and preventability.
We reviewed 128 records, and 41 different AEs were identified in 25 patients (19.5%). Health care-associated infections, hypoglycaemia, pressure sores and procedural complications were the most common harmful events. Twenty two (54%) of the AEs were classified as being avoidable. Two of the 41 AEs were reported as complications according to the Swedish Intensive Care Registry, and one AE had been reported in the internal AE-reporting system.
Almost one fifth of the patients who died on the ICU were subjected to harmful events. GTT has the advantage of identifying more patient injuries caused by AEs than the traditional AE-reporting systems used on many ICUs.
PubMed ID
22571769 View in PubMed
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Advocacy and activism. Supervised injection facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186145
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Fiona Gold
Author Affiliation
AIDS/STD Prevention Street Nurse Program, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):14-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Drug Overdose - prevention & control
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Humans
Preventive Health Services
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - nursing - virology
PubMed ID
12656011 View in PubMed
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Advocacy and coverage of needle exchange programs: results of a comparative study of harm reduction programs in Brazil, Bangladesh, Belarus, Ukraine, Russian Federation, and China.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82481
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2006 Apr;22(4):871-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Burrows Dave
Author Affiliation
AIDS Projects Management Group, Sydney, Australia. dave@aidsprojects.com
Source
Cad Saude Publica. 2006 Apr;22(4):871-9
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bangladesh
Brazil
Byelarus
China
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Harm Reduction
Humans
Male
Needle-Exchange Programs - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Patient Advocacy
Program Evaluation
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Ukraine
Abstract
To prevent or mitigate an AIDS epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs), effective activities need to be implemented on a large enough scale to reach and assist sufficient numbers of drug users and thereby change their risk behaviors related to drug use and sex. Recent work by UNAIDS on "high coverage sites", adopting the above strategies, has shown that one of the key elements in achieving high coverage is ongoing and sophisticated advocacy. High coverage harm reduction sites were studied through literature search and site visits, including key informant interviews, review of service statistics, and data analysis, in order to document the steps that led to scaling up, the way coverage was defined in these sites, and the lessons learned from their efforts. Syringe-exchange programs can achieve high coverage of IDUs. Monitoring to determine regular reach (those who are in regular contact with harm reduction services) should be added to uniform data collection carried out by harm reduction programs. Advocacy is crucial to achieving high coverage.
PubMed ID
16612440 View in PubMed
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AIDS prevention plans must reflect local values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135478
Source
Science. 2011 Apr 8;332(6026):173
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-8-2011
Author
Alexey Mazus
Source
Science. 2011 Apr 8;332(6026):173
Date
Apr-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Epidemics - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Social Values
Notes
Comment On: Science. 2010 Jul 9;329(5988):165-720616264
PubMed ID
21474735 View in PubMed
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An examination of injection drug use trends in Victoria and Vancouver, BC after the closure of Victoria's only fixed-site needle and syringe programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127571
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2012 Jul;23(4):338-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Andrew Ivsins
Clifton Chow
Scott Macdonald
Tim Stockwell
Kate Vallance
David C Marsh
Warren Michelow
Cameron Duff
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University Victoria, PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria, BCV8Y 2E4, Canada. aivsins@uvic.ca
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2012 Jul;23(4):338-40
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Crack Cocaine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Harm Reduction
Health Facility Closure
Humans
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Needle-Exchange Programs - supply & distribution
Public Health
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Needle and syringe programmes (NSPs) have been established as effective harm reduction initiatives to reduce injection drug use (IDU)-related risk behaviours, including sharing needles. On May 31, 2008, Victoria, BC's only fixed site NSP was shut down due to community and political pressure. This study examines and compares IDU trends in Victoria with those in Vancouver, BC, a city which has not experienced any similar disruption of IDU-related public health measures.
Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by interviewer-administered questionnaires conducted with injection drug users (n=579) in Victoria and Vancouver between late 2007 and late 2010.
Needle sharing increased in Victoria from under 10% in early 2008 to 20% in late 2010, whilst rates remained relatively low in Vancouver. Participants in Victoria were significantly more likely to share needles than participants in Vancouver. Qualitative data collected in Victoria highlight the difficulty participants have experienced obtaining clean needles since the NSP closed. Recent injection of crack cocaine was independently associated with needle sharing.
The closure of Victoria's fixed site NSP has likely resulted in increased engagement in high-risk behaviours, specifically needle sharing. Our findings highlight the contribution of NSPs as an essential public health measure.
PubMed ID
22280916 View in PubMed
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178 records – page 1 of 18.