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Adolescents' experiences of well-being when living with a long-term illness or disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87534
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Berntsson Leeni
Berg Marie
Brydolf Marianne
Hellström Anna-Lena
Author Affiliation
The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden. leeni.berntsson@fhs.gu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):419-25
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Happiness
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Sick Role
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Present-day society has produced changes in family living patterns and conditions and this has resulted in new stressors and health problems. Most children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabilities, who were previously cared for at hospitals and institutions for long periods, are now integrated in society and they are expected to live a normal life in the conditions that currently prevail. The number of young people with long-term illnesses/disability has increased worldwide during the last decades. There is lack of studies relating to the way young people regard their daily lives and factors that are important for their well-being. The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of feeling good in daily life in adolescents living with a long-term illness or disability. Eight boys and seven girls, aged between 12 and 19 years, with different conditions of long-term illness or disability, participated in the study. Tape-recorded interviews were conducted between the years 2003-2004 and the data were analysed using content analysis. The results revealed that the adolescents with long-term illness generally experienced well-being like everybody else. Three themes were found to be important in order to feel good: 'a feeling of acceptance of illness/disability as a natural part of life', 'a feeling of support' and 'a feeling of personal growth'. This study concludes that adolescents with long-term illness or disabilities experience well-being when they are allowed to prepare for living a normal life integrated in society.
PubMed ID
18036004 View in PubMed
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An international comparison of patterns of participation in leisure activities for children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120216
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2012;15(5):369-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
A. Ullenhag
M K Bult
A. Nyquist
M. Ketelaar
R. Jahnsen
L. Krumlinde-Sundholm
L. Almqvist
M. Granlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Neuropediatric unit, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.ullenhag@ki.se
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2012;15(5):369-85
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disabled Children - psychology
Female
Happiness
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Netherlands
Norway
Play and Playthings - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether there are differences in participation in leisure activities between children with and without disabilities in Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands and how much personal and environmental factors explain leisure performance.
In a cross-sectional analytic design, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, CAPE, was performed with 278 children with disabilities and 599 children without disabilities aged 6-17 years. A one-way between-groups ANOVA explored the differences in participation between the countries. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis assessed if age, gender, educational level, living area and country of residence explained the variance in participation.
Scandinavian children with disabilities participated in more activities with higher frequency compared to Dutch children. The strongest predictor was country of residence. For children without disabilities, differences existed in informal activities, the strongest predictor was gender.
Differences in school- and support systems between the countries seem to influence patterns of participation, affecting children with disabilities most.
PubMed ID
23030304 View in PubMed
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'A second youth': pursuing happiness and respectability through cosmetic surgery in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100639
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Feb 1;32(2):258-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2010
Author
Taina Kinnunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cultural Anthropology, University of Oulu, Finland. taina.kinnunen@oulu.fi
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2010 Feb 1;32(2):258-71
Date
Feb-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Female
Finland
Happiness
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Stress, Psychological
Surgery, Plastic - psychology
Abstract
The paper discusses cosmetic surgery in the Finnish cultural context. It is based on interviews with 22 women and men who underwent surgical procedures, 12 plastic surgeons, and two plastic surgery consultants. The article shows that surgery consumers over 55 years old discuss cosmetic surgery as an investment in a better quality of life. Consumers use cosmetic surgery to resist ageist stereotypes of old people and as compensation for tough life experiences which are believed to cause premature ageing. Although aimed at combatting negative attitudes towards old people, such efforts reproduce an ageist ideology by concealing the very qualities (e.g. wrinkles) associated with ageing. Finally, consumers use cosmetic surgery to correct perceived Finnish physical pathologies, such as heavy foreheads, sagging eyelids, and 'potato' noses, which make them seem less white, sadder, and older than they are. The traditional melancholic Finnish body is thus transformed via surgery to represent openness and positiveness - two qualities strongly associated with both youth and the Americanised ideal as it is touted in Finland. The article demonstrates that consumers use cosmetic surgery to transform both physical and emotional states and that cosmetic surgery must be understood as part of national and global cultural processes.
PubMed ID
20149153 View in PubMed
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Associations between psychosocial factors and happiness among school adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71324
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2003 Jun;9(3):166-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Gerd Karin Natvig
Grethe Albrektsen
Ulla Qvarnstrøm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. Gerd.Natvig@isf.uib.no
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2003 Jun;9(3):166-75
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Female
Happiness
Health promotion
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Peer Group
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
School Nursing
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Students - psychology
Abstract
The concept of health contains aspects of social and mental well-being and not just the absence of disease. The concept of well-being is sometimes used interchangeably with the term happiness, although focus has been on other aspects as well. Here we explore associations between happiness and experience of stress at school, personal and social factors among 887 Norwegian school adolescents participating in a World Health Organization project on health-promoting schools. Happiness was measured by a one item question (ordered responses 1-4). The psychosocial factors were represented by an average score of 3-12 items. Odds ratios of feeling very/quite happy were calculated in multiple logistic regression analyses. An increasing degree of stress experience reduced the feeling of happiness significantly. Furthermore, increasing levels of general self-efficacy increased the odds of feeling happy, whereas the more specific measure of school self-efficacy showed no independent effect. Social support from teachers also enhanced happiness significantly. A less consistent pattern was found for support from peers, but the most happy pupils experienced significantly more support than pupils who reported being unhappy. No significant trend was found with decision control. We also explored associations between happiness and psychosomatic symptoms. Pupils feeling unhappy reported a particular symptom more often and they also had the highest mean number of reported symptoms. To evaluate whether these health indicators represent different dimensions of health, a comparison of strength of associations with common risk factors is made. Implications for health promotion practice are discussed.
PubMed ID
12801248 View in PubMed
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The biometric antecedents to happiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286249
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(9):e0184887
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Petri Böckerman
Alex Bryson
Jutta Viinikainen
Christian Hakulinen
Mirka Hintsanen
Jaakko Pehkonen
Jorma Viikari
Olli Raitakari
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(9):e0184887
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Happiness
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
It has been suggested that biological markers are associated with human happiness. We contribute to the empirical literature by examining the independent association between various aspects of biometric wellbeing measured in childhood and happiness in adulthood. Using Young Finns Study data (n = 1905) and nationally representative linked data we examine whether eight biomarkers measured in childhood (1980) are associated with happiness in adulthood (2001). Using linked data we account for a very rich set of confounders including age, sex, body size, family background, nutritional intake, physical activity, income, education and labour market experiences. We find that there is a negative relationship between triglycerides and subjective well-being but it is both gender- and age-specific and the relationship does not prevail using the later measurements (1983/1986) on triglycerides. In summary, we conclude that none of the eight biomarkers measured in childhood predict happiness robustly in adulthood.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28915269 View in PubMed
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A compensating income variation approach to valuing 34 health conditions in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295755
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2017 11; 27(Pt A):167-183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
11-2017
Author
Tinna Laufey Asgeirsdottir
Kristin Helga Birgisdottir
Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir
Sigurdur Pall Olafsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Economics, University of Iceland, Oddi v/Sturlugotu, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. Electronic address: ta@hi.is.
Source
Econ Hum Biol. 2017 11; 27(Pt A):167-183
Date
11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Happiness
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Iceland
Income - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Using data from an Icelandic health-and-lifestyle survey carried out in 2007, 2009, and 2012, we employ a compensating income variation (CIV) approach to estimate the monetary value sufficient to compensate individuals for the presence of various sub-optimal health conditions. This method is inexpensive and easy on subjects and has been applied to several desiderata that do not have revealed market prices. The CIV literature is, however, still limited in its application to health and thus information about its suitability is limited. With the aim of shedding light on the method´s appropriateness we thus provide a broad-view analysis including a spectrum of diseases and conditions that can be held up against more traditionally used methods. CIV for physical conditions vary greatly, but paralysis, fibromyalgia, chronic back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, urinary incontinence, severe headache and thyroid disease were among those consistently associated with substantial well-being reductions. Mental-health results using this method should be read with caution. The societal value of health interventions is multidimensional, including for example increased productivity in the population. However, one of the main positive aspects of increased health is undoubtedly the increased well-being of the treated subjects. Such quality-of-life effects should thus preferably be taken into account. For this reason, information on the value individuals place on recovery from various sub-optimal health conditions is useful when it comes to prioritizing scarce capital in the health sector. It is therefore vital to estimate the importance individuals place on various health states and hold them up against each other. Furthermore, this paper has scientific value as it sheds light on attributes of a potentially useful method in health evaluations.
PubMed ID
28709119 View in PubMed
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Components and correlates of mental well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252907
Source
J Health Soc Behav. 1974 Dec;15(4):320-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1974

Consequences of loneliness on physical activity and mortality in older adults and the power of positive emotions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121664
Source
Health Psychol. 2013 Aug;32(8):921-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Nancy E G Newall
Judith G Chipperfield
Daniel S Bailis
Tara L Stewart
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging and Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. N_Newall@umanitoba.ca
Source
Health Psychol. 2013 Aug;32(8):921-4
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Happiness
Humans
Loneliness - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Mortality - trends
Motor Activity
Power (Psychology)
Risk factors
Abstract
This study examined the longitudinal relationships between loneliness, physical activity, and mortality in older adults. This study also tested the implication of Fredrickson's Broaden and Build Theory (1998, 2001) that positive emotions (happiness) might serve to "undo" the detrimental effects of negative emotions (loneliness).
Participants (n = 228; 62% female; aged 77-96 years) took part in the Aging in Manitoba Study (2001) and the Successful Aging Study (2003). Mortality information was assessed in 2008.
Regression analyses showed that loneliness longitudinally predicted perceived physical activity and mortality. Moreover, in support of Fredrickson's theory, happiness moderated these relationships, suggesting that happiness had the power to "undo" the detrimental effects of loneliness on activity and mortality.
Loneliness is an independent risk factor for mortality and reduced physical activity among older adults; however, being happy may offset the negative consequences of being lonely. Future interventions could target positive emotions and loneliness as a way of ultimately enhancing the lifespan and wellspan of older adults.
PubMed ID
22888819 View in PubMed
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The contribution of active and passive leisure to children's well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152017
Source
J Health Psychol. 2009 Apr;14(3):378-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Mark D Holder
Benjamin Coleman
Zoë L Sehn
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Canada. mark.holder@ubc.ca
Source
J Health Psychol. 2009 Apr;14(3):378-86
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Exercise
Female
Happiness
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Abstract
The relation between leisure and well-being, including happiness and self-concept, was examined in 375 children aged 8-12 years. Active leisure (e.g. physical activity) was positively correlated with well-being. Passive leisure (e.g. television and video games) was negatively correlated with well-being. Aspects of active leisure (e.g. the importance of sport to the child and how sports made the child feel) as judged by both parents and children accounted for unique variance in children's wellbeing; passive leisure did not. Similar to previous research on adolescents and adults, active leisure activities were related to children's well-being.
PubMed ID
19293299 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.