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1028 records – page 1 of 103.

A 6-month follow-up study of 1048 patients diagnosed with an occupational skin disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147641
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tarja Mälkönen
Riitta Jolanki
Kristiina Alanko
Ritva Luukkonen
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Antti Lauerma
Päivikki Susitaival
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Control of Hypersensitivity Diseases and Services for Statistics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Industry
Hand Dermatoses - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Patch Tests
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urticaria - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) often have considerable medical and occupational consequences. Previous data on prognostic factors have been derived from studies with fairly small sample sizes.
To determine the medical and occupational outcome in 1048 patients diagnosed with OSD at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and to identify the prognostic risk factors for the continuation of OSD.
Patients examined in 1994-2001 filled out a follow-up questionnaire 6 months after the diagnosis. Data on atopy, contact allergies, and occupation were analysed.
Six months after the diagnosis the skin disease had healed in 27% of the patients. The OSD had cleared up in 17% of those with no changes at work, and in 34% of those who had changed their job/occupation. The best clearing had occurred in the patients with contact urticaria (35%), whereas the healing of allergic (27%) and irritant (23%) contact dermatitis was similar. The risk factors for continuing occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were no changes in work, age > 45 years, food-related occupations, respiratory atopy, and male sex.
The healing of OSD was associated with discontinuation of the causative exposure. A change in work and the presence of easily avoidable work-related allergies were associated with a good prognosis.
PubMed ID
19878240 View in PubMed
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A 10-week strength training program: effect on the motor performance of an unimpaired upper extremity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50029
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
K J Kauranen
P T Siira
H V Vanharanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arm - physiology
Electromyography
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Movement - physiology
Weight Lifting
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Muscle strength training is one of the most common therapy methods in physical therapy programs, and the usual goal of this treatment is to improve muscle strength. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effects of strength training on the other components of motor performance. This study examined the effects of a 10-week strength training program on the motor performance of the hand, including reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination in normal healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Sixteen healthy women volunteers aged 25 to 45 years participated. INTERVENTION: Subjects accomplished a 10-week muscle strength training program of the upper extremities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination were measured three times on consecutive days, and muscle strength and electromyographic values of the right upper extremity were recorded once before the training period. After the training period, the same measurements were made as before the training. RESULTS: The 10-week strength training decreased choice reaction time by 6% (p
PubMed ID
9710164 View in PubMed
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The 12-year prognosis of hand dermatosis in 896 Finnish farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215520
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Apr;32(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
P. Susitaival
M. Hannuksela
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1995 Apr;32(4):233-7
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Agriculture
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Protective Clothing
Risk factors
Abstract
In all, 896 Finnish farmers (305 men and 587 women), representing 77% of those reporting hand or forearm dermatosis in a questionnaire survey in 1979, were asked again about their dermatosis and current work in 1991. More than 50% of the study population had left farming since 1979. In 1991, 26% of men and 21% of women had a current dermatosis on the hands or forearms, and altogether, 44% of men and 39% of women reported a hand dermatosis within the past 12 months. Significant determinants of persistent hand dermatosis, in a logistic regression model, were continuation of farm work, history of skin atopy, symptoms of metal allergy, and age under 45 years. Handling cattle, e.g., milking, was considered an exacerbating factor of the dermatosis by 37% of those who had milked sometimes in their lives. In this group, 75% of hand dermatoses in those who had finished milking work had healed. The results indicate that giving up or changing work improves the prognosis of hand dermatosis in farming.
PubMed ID
7600779 View in PubMed
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A 25-year perspective of peripheral nerve surgery: evolving neuroscientific concepts and clinical significance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198627
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
G. Lundborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2000 May;25(3):391-414
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anastomosis, Surgical
Animals
Female
Hand Injuries - surgery
Humans
Male
Nerve Regeneration - physiology
Neurosurgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Peripheral Nerves - physiology - surgery
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Sweden
Abstract
In spite of an enormous amount of new experimental laboratory data based on evolving neuroscientific concepts during the last 25 years peripheral nerve injuries still belong to the most challenging and difficult surgical reconstructive problems. Our understanding of biological mechanisms regulating posttraumatic nerve regeneration has increased substantially with respect to the role of neurotrophic and neurite-outgrowth promoting substances, but new molecular biological knowledge has so far gained very limited clinical applications. Techniques for clinical approximation of severed nerve ends have reached an optimal technical refinement and new concepts are needed to further increase the results from nerve repair. For bridging gaps in nerve continuity little has changed during the last 25 years. However, evolving principles for immunosuppression may open new perspectives regarding the use of nerve allografts, and various types of tissue engineering combined by bioartificial conduits may also be important. Posttraumatic functional reorganizations occurring in brain cortex are key phenomena explaining much of the inferior functional outcome following nerve repair, and increased knowledge regarding factors involved in brain plasticity may help to further improve the results. Implantation of microchips in the nervous system may provide a new interface between biology and technology and developing gene technology may introduce new possibilities in the manipulation of nerve degeneration and regeneration.
PubMed ID
10811744 View in PubMed
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A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156070
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
H A Quinney
Randy Dewart
Alex Game
Gary Snydmiller
Darren Warburton
Gordon Bell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hockey - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.
PubMed ID
18641719 View in PubMed
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A 30-year result of deforming arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165614
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2007 Jul;27(9):881-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Kalevi Kaarela
Kari Laiho
Irma Soini
Author Affiliation
Department of Musculoskeletal Medicine, Tampere University Medical School and Rheumatism Foundation Hospital, 18120 Heinola, Finland. kalevi.kaarela@reuma.fi
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2007 Jul;27(9):881-2
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Antibodies, Antinuclear - analysis - blood - immunology
Arthritis - diagnosis - immunology - physiopathology
Arthrography
Autoantibodies - analysis
DNA - immunology
Disease Progression
Female
Finland
Foot - pathology - radiography
Hand - pathology - radiography
Humans
Joints - immunology - pathology - physiopathology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - immunology - physiopathology
Serotyping
Time Factors
Abstract
Symmetric non-erosive polyarthritis is the most common clinical feature in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report on a 42-year follow-up of a 71-year-old woman who first had polyarthritis in 1963 at the age of 29 and continuously since 1975. SLE was diagnosed in 2000 at the age of 66 as anti-dsDNA (56 kIU/l), and antinuclear antibodies (1:2,560) turned positive. In 2005 hand and feet radiographs revealed severe Jaccoud's arthritis with subluxations but without erosions.
PubMed ID
17225923 View in PubMed
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[Absence of the palmar c triradius. Dermatoglyphic and geneologic study of a genetic character transmitted since the 17th century in a Quebec family].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242476
Source
Ann Genet. 1983;26(3):174-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
F B Genest
P. Genest
Source
Ann Genet. 1983;26(3):174-6
Date
1983
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Dermatoglyphics
Female
Fingers - abnormalities - radiography
Foot - radiography
France - ethnology
Hand - radiography
Humans
Male
Pedigree
Phenotype
Quebec
Sex Chromosomes
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A dermatoglyphic research on the absence of the palmar c-triradius was carried out in a Canadian family line originating from a French married couple who settled in the Quebec City area in 1649. Of the 51 individuals examined, 34 showed that c-triradius was missing on one or both palms. The study of the family tree and of the data confirms the hypothesis that an absent palmar c-triradius is an autosomal dominant trait transmitted by an heterozygous genotype with, in the present observation, an incidence of 66,6% and an estimated penetrance of 44,1%.
PubMed ID
6606380 View in PubMed
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[A casual link between shaking hands and risk of infection].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180803
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Annakaisa Suominen
Pentti Huovinen
Author Affiliation
Mikrobiekologian ja tulehdustautien osasto PL 57, 20521 Turku. annakaisa.suominen@ktl.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(3):305-10
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - transmission
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
Male
Office Visits
Physician-Patient Relations
Risk assessment
PubMed ID
15061008 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of a wearable hand hygiene device with monitoring capabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155144
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
V M Boscart
K S McGilton
A. Levchenko
G. Hufton
P. Holliday
G R Fernie
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. boscart.veronique@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2008 Nov;70(3):216-22
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Electronics
Female
Focus Groups
Gels - administration & dosage
Hand Disinfection
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infection Control - instrumentation - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Reminder Systems - instrumentation
Abstract
Transmisssion of infection within healthcare institutions is a significant threat to patients and staff. One of the most effective means of prevention is good hand hygiene. A research team at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Ontario, Canada, developed a wearable hand disinfection system with monitoring capabilities to enhance hand wash frequency. We present the findingsof the first phase of a larger study addressing the hypothesis that an electronic hand hygiene system with monitoring and reminding propertieswill increase hand hygiene compliance. This first phase focused on the acceptability and usability of the wearable electronic hand wash device ina clinical environment. The feedback from healthcare staff to the first prototype has provided evidence for the research team to continue with the development of this technology.
Notes
Erratum In: J Hosp Infect. 2009 Apr;71(4):389
PubMed ID
18799234 View in PubMed
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Access to hand hygiene in eastern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147556
Source
Can J Infect Control. 2009;24(3):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Joseph V Vayalumkal
Colette Ouellet
Virginia R Roth
Author Affiliation
Canadian Field Epidemiology Program, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Infect Control. 2009;24(3):153-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Hand Disinfection - standards
Humans
Hygiene
Ontario
Personnel, Hospital - standards
Point-of-Care Systems - standards
Abstract
Hand hygiene compliance improves when alcohol-based hand products (ABHP) are provided at the point-of-care (POC). However, it is not known how many facilities have the infrastructure available to provide easy access to ABHP currently.
To describe the extent to which facilities in the Champlain Infection Control Network (CICN) provide POC access to ABHP.
A survey was conducted of all healthcare facilities in the CICN in October 2007. Sites were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire regarding number and location of ABHP dispensers on one ward in their facilities. The primary outcome measures included: the proportion of facilities providing any POC access to ABHP and the proportion of ABHP dispensers that were at POC, hallways and other areas.
A total of 18 of 59 (31%) long-term care facilities (LTCF) and 14 of 18 (78%) acute-care facilities (ACF) participated in the survey. Intensive care units (ICUs) were present in seven (50%) of the ACF. POC access to ABHP was provided in 44% of LTCF, 50% of ACF and 71% of ICUs surveyed. In LTCF 20% of ABHP dispensers were at the POC compared to 23% in ACF and 42% in ICUs.
Although ABHP is available in these settings, most dispensers are not provided at the POC. Hospitals and LTCF need to increase the number of ABHP dispensers available, with a particular emphasis on placing them at the POC in accordance with provincial guidelines.
PubMed ID
19891168 View in PubMed
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1028 records – page 1 of 103.