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Cold induced changes in fatty acids of the rat and hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297275
Source
Arctic Aeroemedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 67-5.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 1967
REF ALASKA RC AAL -TR - 67- 5 955 .U9 no . 67-5 1967 COPY 1 COL D INDUCED CHANGES IN FATTY ACIDS OF THE RAT AND HAMSTER Darre ll D . Williams Wesley S. Platner April 1961 ARCT I C AEROMEDICAL LABORATO RY AEROSPACE MEDICAL DIVISION AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND FORT WAINWRIGHT
  1 document  
Source
Arctic Aeroemedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report 67-5.
Date
April 1967
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1099801
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Rats
Hamsters
Adipose Tissue
Hibernation
Liver
Abstract
Data are presented to show that cold acclimation induces an increase in the relative level of unsaturation in white adipose tissue of both the rat and the hamster. This elevated level of unsaturation is maintained during hibernation in the hamster. Brown adipose shows no increase in unsaturation under these same conditions. During the process of cold acclimation, a relatively higher level of unsaturation occurs in the liver of the hamster but not in that of the rat. Hibernation does not alter the level of saturation in the liver of the hamster.
Notes
ALASKA RC955.U9 no.67-5
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The growth of human tumors in the hibernating hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298729
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force base, Alaska. Technical report TR-57-18. 7 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1959
I REF ALASKA RC 955 I U9 . no . 57- 18 1959 COPY 1 ..... . - .... THE GROWTH OF HUMAN TUMORS IN THE HIBERNATING HAMSTER TECHNICAL REPORT 57-18 LADD BASE A L AIR A F"ORCE s K A This report has been reviewed and is approved. itw.~~ Lieutenant Colonel, US.AF (MSC
  1 document  
Author
Patterson, W. Bradford
Lyman, Charles P.
Patterson, Helen
Author Affiliation
Harvard Medical School and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force base, Alaska. Technical report TR-57-18. 7 p.
Date
October 1959
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
576551
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Hamsters
Human tumors
Hibernation
Cold Temperature
Abstract
With the recent development of technics [sp] for transplanting human tumors to the cheek pouch of.cortisone-treated hamsters, it has become possible to test the response of human tissues under the conditions of hibernation. During the past year we have tested five transplantable human tumors. Our results indicate that the growth of this tissue from a homeothermic mammal is markedly inhibited by hibernation, but that the tumor survives after prolonged exposure to these low temperatures. Our primary reason for carrying out this study was to test the possibility that the growth rate of these heterologous tumors might be slowed down sufficiently to provide a means of temporarily "storing" transplantable human tumors.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.57-18
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Hibernation and cold storage effects on the phosphates in hamster blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298766
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-47. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
( --= REF ALASKA RC ~ ' 955 6 c .U9 : ; no . 60 -47 ~ I 1961 ...:i ; COPY l ~~ HIBERNATION AND COLD STORAGE EFFECTS ON THE PHOSPHATES IN HAMSTER BLOOD Mary Anne Brock The Biological Laboratories Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY
  1 document  
Author
Brock, Mary Anne
Author Affiliation
The Biological Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-47. 10 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
598602
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Golden hamsters
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Hibernation
Phosphate
Blood
Abstract
No significant changes from control levels were found in phosphate fractions of erythrocytes and plasma analyzed in cold-exposed golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). The effect of depressed temperature on red cells after 3 days of hibernation or storage was reflected in decreased easily hydrolyzable phosphate and increased difficultly hydrolyzable phosphate. These changes were interpreted as probably the result of diminished removal of triosephosphate followed by an increase in phosphorylated hexoses. ADP was not rephosphorylated at a rate equal to the esterification of hexoses by ATP, and a diminution of ATP occurred. Furthermore, significant increases in inorganic phosphate occurred in hibernator's erythrocytes and plasma. These were accounted for in the plasma as the result of phosphatase action on phospholipids. In erythrocytes, the other organic phosphate compounds must contribute to this fraction. Six hours following the initiation of arousal from hibernation, an almost complete return to control values for phosphate fractions was observed.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-47
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Osmotic regulation in the tissues of hibernating mammals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298765
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-45. 104 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
ground squirrel tissues were not. A new type of freezing point depression osmometer is described which utilizes stream-mixing as a mechanism of temperature control. In vitro weight change experiments on tissues of warm room and hiberna- ting hamsters and of hibernating ground squirrels indicate
  1 document  
Author
Willis, John Steele
Author Affiliation
The Department of Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-45. 104 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
5221291
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Ground squirrels
Hamsters
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Hibernation
Tissue swelling
Abstract
Since it had been demonstrated that cold swelling of tissues at low temperatures in vitro is caused by a failure of the "sodium pump, " and since tissues of hibernating mammals have been shown to be resistant to cold in vitro with regard to membrane function and metabolism, it was of interest to determine whether tissues of hibernating mammals were resistant to cold swelling. This was particularly so because it had been reported that ground squirrel tissues were not.
A new type of freezing point depression osmometer is described which utilizes stream-mixing as a mechanism of temperature control. In vitro weight change experiments on tissues of warm room and hibernating hamsters and of hibernating ground squirrels indicate that swelling does occur in these species as in rats. The in vivo water content of tissues of hibernating ground squirrels and hamsters is never greater and frequently is less than that of tissues from awake animals.
In hamsters, resistance to cold swelling is abolished as the individual arouses from hibernation and is absent during at least part of the subsequent period of normothermia. Loss of solids from incubated diaphragms is less at 6° C than at 37° C in vitro in all groups except awake ground squirrels. In awake hamster incubated diaphragms, solid loss is increased at 6° C by the presence of NaF. Diaphragms of hibernating hamsters and ground squirrels, however, resist this effect. Saturated fat in the diet of awake hamsters tends to abolish the resistance of their diaphragms to cold swelling.
Freezing point determinations of plasma indicated that hibernating hamsters have slightly but significantly more concentrated plasma than awake hamsters. The concentration of hibernating hamster plasma is considerably higher than Krebs' medium. The concentration of awake ground squirrel plasma is very high. The plasma concentration of hibernating ground squirrels is lower, though it is as concentrated as hibernating hamster plasma. Comparison of weight change and hydration change of incubated diaphragtns in this study indicated that weight change curves are a poor measure of swelling because of solid loss during incubation. The mechanism of in vivo swelling is discussed. It is concluded that, although other factors surely play a role, in vivo swelling may occur by the same process as that of in vitro swelling. Possible mechanisms of resistance to cold swelling are discussed.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-45
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Production and lifespan of erythrocytes during hibernation in the golden hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298758
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-29. 17 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
October 1961
REF, ALAS KA RC 955 .U9 - no. 60-29 1961 COPY l MO ~~ PRODUCTION AND LIFE SPAN OF ERYTHROCYTES DURING IDBERNATION IN THE GOLDEN HAMSTER Mary Anne Brock The Biological Laboratorie s Harvard Univ ersity Cambridge, Massachusetts ARCTIC AEROMEDICAL LABORATORY FORT WAINWRIGHT
  1 document  
Author
Brock, Mary Ann
Author Affiliation
The Biological Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-29. 17 p.
Date
October 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1039889
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Hamster
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Hibernation
Erythrocytes
Abstract
One day following radioiron injection, the concentration of the isotope in erythrocytes of control hamsters was 14.1 times the concentration in hibernators' erythrocytes during the second day of hibernation. During this same period, hibernators' plasma contained 4.62 times the control concentration of radioiron. At definite times after tagging, the activity of chromium51-labeled erythrocytes was measured in warm- and cold- exposed animals and in hamsters after measured periods of hibernation. In the active animals, the potential erythrocyte half-life was approximately 40 days; the effective half-life was about 15 days. Retardation of senescence and the virtual absence of random destruction in erythrocytes of hibernating hamsters increased the potential erythrocyte life to approximately 160 days. Both the minimal metabolic activity of the animal and the retardation of intrinsic senescent processes in erythrocytes were considered to be responsible for the diminished erythropoietic stimulus in hibernating hamsters. Radioiron transport across the cell membrane, its incorporation into hemoglobin, and mitotic activity of narrow erythroid elements were component processes of erythropoiesis which were probably retarded.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-29
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