Skip header and navigation

Refine By

80 records – page 1 of 8.

Abnormally high concentrations of amphetamine in blood of impaired drivers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9098
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2005 Sep;50(5):1215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
A W Jones
A. Holmgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Toxicology, University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden. wayne.jones@RMV.se
Source
J Forensic Sci. 2005 Sep;50(5):1215-20
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amphetamine - blood
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - blood - diagnosis
Automobile Driving
Benzodiazepines - blood
Central Nervous System Stimulants - blood
Databases
Female
Forensic Medicine
Hallucinogens - blood
Humans
Male
Mass Fragmentography
Middle Aged
Substance Abuse Detection
Sweden
Tetrahydrocannabinol - blood
Abstract
We present a case series (N = 46) of individuals apprehended in Sweden for driving under the influence of drugs (DUID). These cases were selected because the concentrations of amphetamine in blood were abnormally high (> 5.0 mg/L), the highest being 17 mg/L. In comparison, the median blood-amphetamine concentration in a population of DUID offenders (N = 6,613) was 0.70 mg/L. Among the DUID suspects with extremely high blood-amphetamine concentrations there were 38 men (83%) with mean age of 37.8 y (SD 6.8 y) and 8 women (17%) with a mean age of 34.1 y (SD 4.3 y). All had previously been registered in our database (mean 12 times, median 9 times) for drug-related offences, including DUID. The concentration of amphetamine in blood of female offenders was slightly higher than the concentration in male offenders (6.6 mg/L vs. 5.8 mg/L), although this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The drugs other than amphetamine most frequently encountered in the blood samples were tetrahydrocannabinol and benzodiazepines (diazepam and nordiazepam). The commonest signs of drug use reported by the arresting police officers were bloodshot and glazed (watery) eyes, restlessness, talkativeness, exaggerated reflexes and slurred speech. Unsteady gait and dilated pupils were observed in some but not all individuals. These very high concentrations of amphetamine were tolerated without any fatalities indicating a pronounced adaptation to the pharmacologic effects of this central stimulant. Anecdotal information indicated that those with the very highest concentrations of amphetamine in blood had swallowed the drug to prevent being apprehended in possession of an illicit substance.
PubMed ID
16225234 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abuse of Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Pharmacological, neuropsychiatric and behavioral aspects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46505
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 6;157(6):724-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-1995
Author
J C Nielsen
K. Nicholson
B L Pitzner-Jørgensen
M. Undén
Author Affiliation
Hillerød Sygehus, psykiatrisk afdeling S.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 6;157(6):724-7
Date
Feb-6-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Diseases - chemically induced - drug therapy
English Abstract
Hallucinogens - adverse effects
Humans
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - drug therapy
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine - adverse effects - pharmacology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - drug therapy - psychology
Abstract
Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a popular recreational drug, a "designer drug", which has been developed from the basic structure in amphetamine. Ecstasy has now reached the illegal drug market in Denmark via the US, Great Britain and Sweden. The drug is related to a certain youth culture from which it is estimated that many drug abusers have been recruited. The desired effects of ecstasy, namely enhanced openness, awareness and empathy, have previously been used in various therapeutic connections. In later years the drug has led to abuse which, in connection with certain cultural behaviour patterns (for example in discotheques), can cause dangerous psychiatric as well as somatic effects. The undesirable psychiatric effects range from fear through depression to actual psychoses, and the somatic effects vary from symptoms of increased sympathetic activity to malignant hyperthermia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and lethal hepatotoxicity. The last mentioned symptoms occur in connection with prolonged physical activities such as exhausting dancing sessions. The article discusses the available treatments for conditions of abuse and stresses the need for prophylactic efforts in the form of information and awareness of the problem.
PubMed ID
7701630 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Addiction to euphorizing drugs among young people in arhus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256329
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1971 Apr 9;133(14):659-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-9-1971

Adolescent ecstasy and other drug use in the National Survey of Parents and Youth: the role of sensation-seeking, parental monitoring and peer's drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93413
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jul;33(7):919-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Martins Silvia S
Storr Carla L
Alexandre Pierre K
Chilcoat Howard D
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-1900, USA. smartins@jhsph.edu
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jul;33(7):919-33
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Hallucinogens
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Peer Group
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The association between high sensation-seeking, close friends' drug use and low parental monitoring with ecstasy (MDMA) use in adolescence was examined in a sample of US household-dwelling adolescents aged 12-18 years (N=5049). We also tested whether associations were of stronger magnitude than associations between these correlates and marijuana or alcohol/tobacco use in adolescence. Data from Round 2 of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY) Restricted Use Files (RUF) was analyzed via Jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. High sensation-seekers were more likely to be ecstasy, marijuana, and alcohol/tobacco users, respectively, as compared to low sensation-seekers. High sensation-seeking and close friends' drug use were more strongly associated with ecstasy as compared to marijuana and alcohol/tobacco use. Low parental monitoring was associated with marijuana use and alcohol/tobacco use and there was a trend for it to be associated with ecstasy use. Ecstasy use is strongly associated with peer drug use and more modestly associated with high sensation-seeking. School prevention programs should target high-sensation-seeking adolescents and also encourage them to affiliate with non-drug using peers.
PubMed ID
18355973 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adolescents who have tried illicit drugs and experienced psychiatric symptoms seldom seek professional help. A pilot study of 18-year old high school students in an urban district]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45815
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 1;101(14):1280-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Mattias Gunnarsson
Claudia Fahlke
Jan Balldin
Author Affiliation
Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Apr 1;101(14):1280-2
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - drug effects
Adult
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - therapy
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Cocaine-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - therapy
English Abstract
Female
Hallucinogens - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - complications - psychology - therapy
Mental Disorders - chemically induced - diagnosis - therapy
Pilot Projects
Street Drugs - adverse effects
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - psychology - therapy
Abstract
In recent years the use of illicit drugs has increased among adolescents in Sweden. Prolonged use of illicit drugs causes different psychiatric symptoms, but usage of short duration has also been reported to induce similar symptoms. It is less known how these psychiatric symptoms caused by occasional intake of illicit drugs are managed. The present study examined to which extent students in senior high school (third grade) have experienced psychiatric symptoms due to intake of illicit drugs, and to which extent they sought support in their nearby environment or professional help for these problems. The result shows that out of 104 18-year old students, 25 percent had tested illicit drugs, with no significant gender difference. 38 percent of the users reported psychiatric symptoms. In most of these cases either amphetamine or ecstasy had been used. The most common negative feelings reported were worry/anxiety, low spiritedness/depression, and feelings of unreality. The majority had not sought help for their problems among friends or adults. No one sought professional help. The frequency of adolescents that have tried drugs is on a level with other national surveys. Therefore it is most likely that the results regarding students who had experienced drug related psychiatric symptoms, and how they handled this experience, are representative for other eighteen-year-olds as well. It is of great concern that schools, medical services and social services have the knowledge that one fourth of the adolescents are trying illicit drugs, and almost four out of ten experience drug related psychiatric symptoms but most of them do not seek support or treatment for these symptoms.
PubMed ID
15101214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and first experience with psychoactive drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6943
Source
Int J Addict. 1986 Dec;21(12):1285-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
B. Segal
Source
Int J Addict. 1986 Dec;21(12):1285-306
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Cannabis
Central Nervous System Depressants
Central Nervous System Stimulants
Child
Cocaine
Comparative Study
Female
Hallucinogens
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotropic Drugs
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
By utilizing the Gutman Scaling technique and by plotting acquisition curves, a number of different patterns of involvement with different psychoactive drugs were discerned. A stable, sequential, and cumulative hierarchy of experience with drugs was found to be established at age 15, but different peak years exist for trying different drugs. It was also found that drug use may be cumulative for some drugs and not for others. Special emphasis has been given to discussing the research implications that have arisen from the present study.
PubMed ID
2879802 View in PubMed
Less detail

80 records – page 1 of 8.