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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
Cites: Disasters. 2000 Sep;24(3):262-7011026159
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jun 1;152(11):733-720197507
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
Cites: Nature. 2010 Feb 18;463(7283):878-920164905
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Mar 18;362(11):e3820200362
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)--Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241374
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1983 Dec 9;32(48):635-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-9-1983
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1983 Dec 9;32(48):635-6
Date
Dec-9-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Adult
Canada
Haiti - ethnology
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
PubMed ID
6417469 View in PubMed
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Acquired (or congenital) immunodeficiency syndrome in infants born of Haitian mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242027
Source
N Engl J Med. 1983 Apr 7;308(14):842
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1983

Afro-American migrant farmworkers: a culture in isolation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192427
Source
AIDS Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):789-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M. Gadon
R M Chierici
P. Rios
Author Affiliation
Tufts University School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Baystate Medical Center 01199, USA. mgadon@mass.med.org
Source
AIDS Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):789-801
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Agriculture
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - transmission
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Jamaica - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior
Social Isolation
Transients and Migrants
United States
Abstract
Increasing rates of HIV infection have been found in migrant farmworkers in the USA over the past decade. By virtue of lifestyle, language and culture, these workers are not exposed to the typical media HIV prevention messages. To determine their level of knowledge about this disease for use in prevention messages targeted specifically to this population, five gender specific focus groups were conducted among Haitian, Jamaican and African-American migrant farmworkers in upstate New York. The focus groups revealed that the health belief system of these Afro-American migrant workers primarily reflects that of their indigenous culture. This impacts their interpretation and utilization of risk aversive behaviours. The data also suggest that the culture of migrancy itself affects the extent of risky behaviours practised, but further studies are needed to examine this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
11720648 View in PubMed
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AIDS and the alleged Haitian connection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238150
Source
N Y State J Med. 1985 Nov;85(11):664
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
J R Leonidas
Source
N Y State J Med. 1985 Nov;85(11):664
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology
Canada
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
United States
PubMed ID
3866994 View in PubMed
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AIDS in a Canadian woman who had helped prostitutes in Port-au-Prince.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241567
Source
Lancet. 1983 Sep 17;2(8351):680-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1983

AIDS in Haitian immigrants and in a Caucasian woman closely associated with Haitians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241400
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 1;129(11):1209-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1983
Author
M. Laverdière
J. Tremblay
R. Lavallée
Y. Bonny
M. Lacombe
J. Boileau
J. Lachapelle
C. Lamoureux
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 1;129(11):1209-12
Date
Dec-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Adult
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Male
Mycoses - diagnosis - epidemiology
Quebec
Toxoplasmosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Virus Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
In Montreal the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was seen in eight Haitian immigrants and one Caucasian woman who had lived with Haitian immigrants for 3 years before the onset of her illness. AIDS was characterized by opportunistic infections alone in seven patients, by opportunistic infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in one patient and by chronic generalized lymphadenopathy in one patient. Five of the patients had presented with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections 1 to 12 months before the onset of opportunistic infections. All nine patients were found to have recall anergy by skin testing for delayed hypersensitivity. Enumeration of the lymphocyte subpopulations in three patients showed a marked inversion of the ratio of helper to suppressor T lymphocytes. Six of the patients died as a result of the opportunistic infections; autopsies showed no recognizable causes of immunodeficiency. Thus, there is in Montreal a third clustering of AIDS cases in North America related to Haitian immigrants.
Notes
Cites: J Exp Med. 1970 Nov;132(5):1001-184919141
Cites: Clin Chem. 1975 Nov;21(12):1735-461182993
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1981 Nov;14(5):486-917031082
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 May 19;308(20):1181-46221192
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1982 Oct;97(4):533-96982014
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Jan 20;308(3):125-96217423
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1983 Mar;98(3):277-846299151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1982 Jul 15;307(3):162-56806657
PubMed ID
6640458 View in PubMed
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Aids-related knowledge and practices in migrant populations: the case of Montrealers of Haitian origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219237
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Adrien
J F Boivin
C. Hankins
V. Leaune
Y. Tousignant
J. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Centre for AIDS Studies, Public Health Unit, Montreal General Hospital, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 1994;42(1):50-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - psychology - transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Quebec
Questionnaires
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Sexual Partners
Abstract
The objectives of the study were to determine knowledge levels regarding AIDS and its modes of transmission, and to describe sexual behaviour of Montrealers of Haitian origin. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted in three phases between 1987 and 1990. A questionnaire was administered in a face-to-face interview with the exception of the section concerning sexual practices which was self-administered for those respondents who were literate in French. The study was conducted among 775 men and women residing in the metropolitan Montreal region. These individuals were aged 15 to 39, were born in Haiti or had at least one parent born in Haiti. Knowledge levels were high except for misconceptions about HIV transmission through casual contact and mosquito bites. There was a significant association between high risk sexual behaviour and marital status with the odds of having had multiple partners significantly raised for previously married individuals (OR = 5.96, 95% CI = 3.09; 11.50). High risk behaviour was also associated with being under 25 years of age (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.40; 5.74), knowing someone with HIV/AIDS (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.05; 3.37), being male (OR = 6.81, 95% CI = 3.99; 11.60) and earlier year of interview. Montrealers of Haitian origin, with their specific AIDS-related socio-cultural characteristics, constitute a community which is intermediate between their country of origin, Haiti, and their host country, Canada.
PubMed ID
8134666 View in PubMed
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An exploration of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs toward organ and tissue donation among the adult Haitian population living in the Greater Montreal area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113750
Source
Dynamics. 2013;24(1):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Wendy Sherry
Bernard Tremblay
Andréa Maria Laizner
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre. wendy.sherry@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Dynamics. 2013;24(1):12-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Competency
Decision Making
Female
Focus Groups
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Trust
Abstract
The decision to donate organs and tissues has the potential to save and improve the quality of life of the transplant recipient. Previous studies suggest lack of information, fears, and prejudices have prevented some cultural minorities from participating in organ and tissue donation (OTD). There is scarce information about the views of those who might be approached for potential donation in the Haitian community. In fact, Haitians are the largest Black ethno-cultural community in Montreal and are at higher risk for needing a kidney transplant (Desilets & Sodjinou, 2006).
To learn what Haitians know and believe about OTD in order to enable registered nurses to develop culturally appropriate approaches and interventions.
A qualitative descriptive design was used to explore the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes toward OTD among the adult Haitian population in the Montreal area. Focus groups were held with 24 members of the Haitian community and moderated by Haitian registered nurses who spoke French and Creole.
Group interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes. Adult participants represented younger and older members of the community. They were from different socioeconomic backgrounds.
Knowledge about donation was influenced by the media, personal beliefs and experience, and level of trust in the health care system. Participants' recommendations on how to address OTD issues within the Haitian community were shaped by beliefs about wholeness, perceived need for donation and key persons who could influence decision-making behaviour.
The level of distrust with the health care system and the study consent process used with participants might have affected the degree of participation and disclosure in discussions.
PubMed ID
23691717 View in PubMed
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Anti-HIV antibodies and other serological and immunological parameters among normal Haitians in Montreal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103658
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 1990;3(2):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
L. Frappier-Davignon
M C Walker
A. Adrien
L A el Badraoui
M. Desrosiers
M V O'Shaughnessy
F. Affoyon
J M Dupuy
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology Research Center, Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval, Canada.
Source
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 1990;3(2):166-72
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Protozoan - analysis
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cytomegalovirus - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
HIV Antibodies - analysis
HIV Seroprevalence
Haiti - ethnology
Hepatitis B Antibodies - analysis
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Lymphocytes
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Toxoplasma - immunology
Abstract
A matched-pair, cross-sectional study of lymphocyte and serological parameters associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 189 randomly chosen, ostensibly healthy adult Haitian immigrants residing in Montreal matched for sex, age (within 5 years), and neighborhood of residence to 189 non-Haitian (Caucasian) controls was done in 1983-1984. Three years later (1986-1987), 41 of the Haitian study subjects and 83 of the non-Haitian controls participated in a follow-up study centered on lymphocyte parameters. A significantly greater number of Haitians than controls had produced antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii. In addition, a greater percentage of the Haitians than the controls were also producing antibodies to two other opportunistic pathogens frequently encountered in AIDS, cytomegalovirus and hepatitis B virus, implying that the Haitians in general had had greater exposure to a variety of infectious agents than had the controls. A few study participants were producing antibodies against two viruses that are related to the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1), the human T-cell lymphotropic viruses I and II (HTLV-I and -II). Two Haitians and one control were producing antibodies against HTLV-I. One study subject and four controls were HTLV-II seropositive. The most interesting and surprising finding was that four (2.1%) of the Haitian study subjects but none of the controls were seropositive for HIV-1. These individuals, two of whom were women and two men, were asymptomatic. Although their individual lymphocyte parameter values fell in the normal range, as a group they had statistically significantly lower average values for their lymphocyte parameters than did the HIV-seronegative Haitian study objects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2153200 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.