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454 records – page 1 of 46.

5 years' experience of 5-S-cysteinyldopa in melanoma diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27508
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1979;59(5):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
G. Agrup
P. Agrup
T. Andersson
L. Hafström
C. Hansson
S. Jacobsson
P E Jönsson
H. Rorsman
A M Rosengren
E. Rosengren
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1979;59(5):381-8
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cysteinyldopa - metabolism - urine
Dihydroxyphenylalanine - analogs & derivatives
Female
Hair Color
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Melanoma - diagnosis - urine
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - urine
Sunlight
Abstract
Determinations of the urinary excretion of 5-S-cysteinyldopa were performed in 571 patients previously treated by surgery for melanoma or melanoma metastasis. 90% of the 161 patients with metastases showed values exceeding 0.15 mg/24 h, and 9% of the 410 patients without metastases had such values. The increase in 5-S-cysteinyldopa excretion was generally more pronounced in men with metastases than in women, 98% of the men and 77% of the women with metastases showing values exceeding 0.15 mg/24 h. High levels of 5-S-cysteinyldopa are of grave prognostic significan4% died within one month, and only 3% survived for more than a year. In Sweden, determination of 5-S-cysteinyldopa in patients operated on for melanoma gives maximum information in the winter (October--March), when sun exposure does not influence the excretion levels.
PubMed ID
93360 View in PubMed
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A 10-year review of p-phenylenediamine allergy and related para-amino compounds at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123867
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lauren LaBerge
Melanie Pratt
Bensun Fong
Genevieve Gavigan
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Ottawa, 1053 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lfratesi@hotmail.com
Source
Dermatitis. 2011 Nov-Dec;22(6):332-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Aminobenzoic Acid - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Amines - adverse effects
Azo Compounds - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Coloring Agents - adverse effects
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hair Dyes - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Patch Tests
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Sulfonamides - adverse effects
Textiles
Time Factors
Abstract
p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is an important allergen; 5.0% of patients tested positive to PPD when patch-tested, according to the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. Hair dyes are the main source of exposure.
To assess the significance of PPD allergy at the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic.
We assessed the epidemiology of PPD allergies and determined the cross-reactivity with other para-amino compounds. Charts of patients visiting the Ottawa Patch Test Clinic between May 1997 and July 2009 were reviewed.
One hundred thirty-four patients were found to have a contact allergy to PPD; 75.4% were female, 24.6% were male, 13.4% were hairdressers, 18.7% had a history of atopy, 90.3% were sensitized by hair dye, 2.2% were sensitized by henna tattoos, and 7.5% were sensitized by other sources. Positive patch-test reactions to textile dyes were seen in 24.6%, 7.5% reacted to benzocaine, 6.0% reacted to sulfa drugs, 1.5% reacted to isopropyl-para-phenylenediamine, and 1.5% reacted to para-aminobenzoic acid.
PPD is an important source of allergic contact allergy. Our results show a significant relationship of PPD with other related para-amino compounds.
PubMed ID
22653006 View in PubMed
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55 cases of allergic reactions to hair dye: a descriptive, consumer complaint-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71451
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2002 Nov;47(5):299-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
H. Søsted
T. Agner
K E Andersen
T. Menné
Author Affiliation
The National Allergy Research Centre for Consumer Products, Department of Dermatology, University of Copenhagen, Gentofte Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2002 Nov;47(5):299-303
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Allergens - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Facial Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Hair Preparations - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phenylenediamines - adverse effects
Scalp Dermatoses - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
Severe facial and scalp dermatitis following the use of permanent hair dyes has been reported in several cases. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD) is known as a potent contact allergen, and PPD is allowed in hair dye at a concentration of 6%. Hair dye reactions are usually diagnosed by the patients themselves, and adverse reactions to hair dye may not necessarily be recorded by the health care system, unless the reactions are especially severe. Based on this assumption, we suspected that hair dye dermatitis was occurring more frequently than reported in the literature. Consumer complaint-based data were obtained by advertising for persons with adverse reactions to hair dye. Among those responding to the advertisement, 55 cases of severe, acute allergic contact dermatitis were identified. The main symptoms were severe oedema of the face, scalp and ears, and clinically this was often mistaken for angio-oedema. The 55 cases comprised a total of 75 visits to the health service and 5 admissions to hospital. 18 persons had sick leave, which supports the impression of very severe dermatitis reactions. 60% were treated with antihistamine, while 52% were treated with corticosteroids. 29% of the cases were patch tested and all were found positive to PPD. Our data presented here clearly show that PPD and its derivatives in hair dye at the present concentrations presents a significant health risk for the population. Furthermore, the severe acute allergic skin reactions are often misdiagnosed in the health care system. The frequency of allergic contact dermatitis resulting from hair dye is likely to be underestimated. New methods to survey the frequency of adverse reactions should be considered.
PubMed ID
12534535 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Physics. 1965 May;11:454
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1965
Author
Beasley, T.M.
Palmer, H.E.
Author Affiliation
Hanford Laboratories (Richland, Washington)
Source
Health Physics. 1965 May;11:454
Date
May-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anaktuvuk Pass
Cesium-137
Hair analysis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 812.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 120.
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Absence of the atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme in Saskatchewan Cree Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221601
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
L E Dyck
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Hum Hered. 1993 Mar-Apr;43(2):116-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - physiopathology
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Asia - ethnology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Flushing - etiology
Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic
Gene Frequency
Hair - enzymology
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Isoelectric Focusing
Isoenzymes - genetics
Mitochondria - enzymology
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Skin Tests
Abstract
Three methods were employed to assess whether human volunteers (Caucasian, Asian or Cree Indian) possessed the typical or atypical mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) isozyme. These methods were: (1) questioning individuals about facial flushing responses following alcohol consumption; (2) application of the ethanol skin patch test, and (3) direct analysis using isoelectric focusing and activity staining of ALDH activity in hair root samples. The results from the three methods were in good agreement and revealed that only the typical ALDH2 isozyme was expressed in Saskatchewan Cree Indians. In agreement with previous reports, the typical ALDH2 was expressed in the Caucasian group of subjects, while both the typical and atypical forms were expressed in the Asian subjects.
PubMed ID
8359813 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of heavy metals in biologic materials of mining workers and of nearby population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176713
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M A Mukasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article contains results concerning spectral analysis of biologic materials (blood and hair) for heavy metals content. These results helped to reveal health risk factors for workers engaged into chromium ores extraction and for nearby residents.
PubMed ID
15636126 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the macro- and trace element composition of the head hair in the inhabitants of Latin America and the population of the Russian Federation from the forensic medical aspect].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217844
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Jul-Sep;37(3):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu V Pavlov
N A Agadzhanian
V I Alisievich
M M Chekhovskikh
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1994 Jul-Sep;37(3):15-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Elements
Female
Forensic Medicine
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Russia
Spectrophotometry - statistics & numerical data
Trace Elements - analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was analysis of forensic medical aspects of macro- and trace element composition of hairs of the head in the residents of Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia and changes in this characteristic during adaptation to conditions of Central Russia. One of our tasks was to define expert criteria for differentiation between the hairs belonging to residents of these countries and Russia. A total of 136 hairs were examined by spectral approximated quantitative analysis using DFS-13 spectrographer. The detected regularity consisted in the following: adaptation of residents of Latin America to conditions of Central Russia was associated with disappearance of some elements and appearance of other ones characteristic of residents of Central Russia (Byelorussians, Russians, Ukrainians).
PubMed ID
7974605 View in PubMed
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Age-based differences in hair zinc of Vancouver preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155088
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2008 Dec;126 Suppl 1:S21-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Ziba Vaghri
Susan Barr
Hubert Wong
Gwen Chapman
Clyde Hertzman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Food, Nutrition and Health, University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada. ziba.vaghri@ubc.ca
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2008 Dec;126 Suppl 1:S21-30
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body Weight
British Columbia
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Sex Factors
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Marginal zinc deficiency (MZD), the subclinical stage of zinc deficiency, is common in industrialized societies. Serum zinc, the most common biomarker of zinc status, lacks sensitivity and specificity to diagnose this deficiency. Hair zinc, however, is sensitive and specific enough to detect MZD in children. Differences in hair zinc associated with age and sex have been reported. These differences have not been investigated thoroughly; therefore, interpretation of the results of hair analyses is difficult. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine the hair zinc status of a group of Vancouver preschoolers (24-71 months) and assess the age- and sex-based differences in their hair zinc. Hair samples were obtained (n = 719) and analyzed for zinc using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Our results indicated a mean hair zinc of 115 +/- 43 microg/g with 17% below the low hair zinc cutoff (70 microg/g). Boys and girls had comparable mean hair zinc, while girls had a significantly higher occurrence of low hair zinc than boys (21% vs. 12%). Children or =4. Our study provides important reference values for the hair zinc of healthy North American preschoolers.
PubMed ID
18806933 View in PubMed
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454 records – page 1 of 46.