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Alcohol consumption is associated with decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from two Scandinavian case-control studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93056
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Feb;68(2):222-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Källberg H.
Jacobsen S.
Bengtsson C.
Pedersen M.
Padyukov L.
Garred P.
Frisch M.
Karlson E W
Klareskog L.
Alfredsson L.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Box 210, Karolinska Institutet, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.kallberg@ki.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Feb;68(2):222-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - prevention & control
Autoantibodies - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peptides, Cyclic - immunology
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and alcohol consumption in combination with smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE). METHODS: Data from two independent case-control studies of RA, the Swedish EIRA (1204 cases and 871 controls) and the Danish CACORA (444 cases and 533 controls), were used to estimate ORs of developing RA for different amounts of alcohol consumed. RESULTS: Alcohol consumption was significantly more common in controls (p
PubMed ID
18535114 View in PubMed
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Analysis of an IFN-gamma gene (IFNG) polymorphism in multiple sclerosis in Europe: effect of population structure on association with disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200714
Source
J Interferon Cytokine Res. 1999 Sep;19(9):1037-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
A. Goris
C. Epplen
P. Fiten
M. Andersson
R. Murru
F L Sciacca
I. Ronsse
S. Jäckel
J T Epplen
M G Marrosu
T. Olsson
L M Grimaldi
G. Opdenakker
A. Billiau
K. Vandenbroeck
Author Affiliation
Rega Institute for Medical Research, University of Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Interferon Cytokine Res. 1999 Sep;19(9):1037-46
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Female
Germany
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Interferon-gamma - genetics
Italy
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
An intronic dinucleotide polymorphism in the IFN-gamma gene (IFNG) was used as a marker for testing association with multiple sclerosis (MS). Disease association was analyzed in case-control sets sampled from four geographically separate European populations (Germany, Northern Italy, Sardinia, and Sweden). Only in the Swedish was a weak disease association of the IFNG allele pattern found, mainly due to a higher frequency of IFNG allele I1 in MS patients. No evidence for association was found in the German or Northern Italian populations. These results contrast with the situation in Sardinia. We have recently reported transmission disequilibrium of IFNG allele I2 in Sardinian MS siblings not carrying the predisposing DRB1 *03 or *04 alleles (Ann. Neurol. 44, 841-842, 1998). Further analysis now shows that I2 is significantly more often transmitted to DRB1 *03-/*04- males, than to DRB1 *03-/*04- females. The odds ratio (OR) for IFNG-associated susceptibility to MS in the total Sardinian DRB1*03-/*04- group was 1.88 for I2 heterozygotes but amounted to 8.235 for I2 homozygotes, suggestive of a recessive mode of inheritance. Score test-based statistics pointed to an I2 allele dosage effect acting in susceptibility. Comparison of the IFNG allele frequencies in seven European populations (Northern Finnish, Southern Finnish, Swedish, Danish, German, Italian, and Sardinian) revealed a highly different distribution pattern. We introduced latitude as a score variable in order to test for trend in binomial proportions. This test statistic showed that for both most common alleles, I1 and I2 (compiled allele frequency about 85%), a significant opposite north-to-south trend is seen throughout Europe. This effect is primarily due to the extreme values found in the outlier populations of Finland and Sardinia. Our findings are discussed with respect to recent literature pertinent to the role of the IFNG chromosome region in autoimmune diseases.
PubMed ID
10505747 View in PubMed
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Analysis of antibody markers, DRB1, DRB5, DQA1 and DQB1 genes and modeling of DR2 molecules in DR2-positive patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35717
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1994 Aug;44(2):110-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
C B Sanjeevi
T P Lybrand
M. Landin-Olsson
I. Kockum
G. Dahlquist
W A Hagopian
J P Palmer
A. Lernmark
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Endocrinology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1994 Aug;44(2):110-9
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Base Sequence
Cricetinae
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - genetics - immunology
Disease Susceptibility - immunology
Genes, MHC Class II
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR2 Antigen - chemistry - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Immunity, Natural - genetics - immunology
Models, Molecular
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Protein Conformation
Recombination, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden
Abstract
HLA-DR2 is negatively associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The aim of the present study was to analyze DR2-positive patients among 425 consecutively diagnosed unrelated Swedish children with IDDM and in 367 matched controls. HLA-DRB, -DQA and -DQB were determined by Taq I restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes was done for DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 and DRB5. DR2 was positive in 11/425 patients (3%) and 101/367 (28%) controls (OR 0.07, p
PubMed ID
7817375 View in PubMed
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An HLA class-II allele frequent in Eskimos and Amerindians is found in the Tyrolean Ice Man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192982
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2001 Jul;65(Pt 4):363-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
G F Fischer
I. Fae
D. Mann
D. Kriks
W. Jäger
W. Platzer
W R Mayr
B. Volc-Platzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Blood Group Serology, University of Vienna Medical School, Austria. gottfried.fischer@akh-wien.ac.at
Source
Ann Hum Genet. 2001 Jul;65(Pt 4):363-9
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Sequence
Calcaneus - metabolism
DNA - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Gene Frequency
Genes, MHC Class II - genetics
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DQ beta-Chains
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
History, Ancient
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Inuits - genetics
Italy
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Mummies
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
DNA was extracted from specimens derived from the calcaneus of the Tyrolean Ice Man under sterile conditions in a laboratory, where no DNA extractions and PCR experiments had been performed before. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining did not reveal any evidence of genomic DNA in the preparation obtained, indicating a high degree of DNA degradation. Nevertheless, we performed PCR amplifications with this sample using primer pairs specific for HLA class II alleles. HLA-DRB and DQB1 alleles were amplified in a nested PCR approach. In one of the reactions, we observed a distinct amplification product, which we directly sequenced. By comparing the obtained nucleotide sequence with a database of HLA alleles we assigned the HLA-DRB1*1402 type to the amplified sample. None of the investigators involved possesses this allele, indicating that no contamination with modern DNA had occurred. The HLA-DRB1*1402 allele is extremely rare in Europe, but is common in Inuits and South American Indians and has previously only once been identified in the laboratory.
PubMed ID
11592925 View in PubMed
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An MHC (HLA-A, -B, C2, BF, HLA-DR, GLO1) haplotype study of 497 Danish normal families with 1970 children including 97 twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37544
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1990 Oct;36(4):141-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
L S Nielsen
H. Eiberg
K. Fenger
J. Mohr
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Genetics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 1990 Oct;36(4):141-8
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Genetic Screening
HLA-A Antigens - genetics
HLA-B Antigens - genetics
HLA-C Antigens - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes - genetics
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Major Histocompatibility Complex - genetics
Male
Recombination, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twins - genetics
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Abstract
Extended MHC haplotypes comprising HLA-A, -B, -DR, C2, BF and GLO1 loci observed in the parents of 497 Danish normal families are presented, with particular regard to the haplotypes that include BF variants or the C2*2 allele. The known association of HLA-B35, -DR1 with both -A3 and -A11 appeared to depend upon the BF type: HLA-B35, BF*S, -DR1 is strongly associated with -A11, whereas -B35,BF*F,-DR1 is strongly associated with -A3. Further, in the present material DZ twins of the same sex shared HLA-haplotypes more often than did twin pairs of different sex.
PubMed ID
2077670 View in PubMed
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Association between occupational exposure to mineral oil and rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13705
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2005;7(6):R1296-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Berit Sverdrup
Henrik Källberg
Camilla Bengtsson
Ingvar Lundberg
Leonid Padyukov
Lars Alfredsson
Lars Klareskog
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. berit.sverdrup@imm.ki.se
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2005;7(6):R1296-303
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Autoantibodies - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Citrulline - immunology
Epitopes - genetics
Female
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mineral Oil - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between exposure to mineral oil and the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and in addition to perform a separate analysis on the major subphenotypes for the disease; namely, rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive RA, RF-negative RA, anticitrulline-positive RA and anticitrulline-negative RA, respectively. A population-based case-control study of incident cases of RA was performed among the population aged 18-70 years in a defined area of Sweden during May 1996-December 2003. A case was defined as an individual from the study base who for the first time received a diagnosis of RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria of 1987. Controls were randomly selected from the study base with consideration taken for age, gender and residential area. Cases (n = 1,419) and controls (n = 1,674) answered an extensive questionnaire regarding lifestyle factors and occupational exposures, including different types of mineral oils. Sera from cases and controls were investigated for RF and anticitrulline antibodies.Among men, exposure to any mineral oil was associated with a 30% increased relative risk of developing RA (relative risk = 1.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.7). When cases were subdivided into RF-positive RA and RF-negative RA, an increased risk was only observed for RF-positive RA (relative risk = 1.4, 95% confidence interval 1.0-2.0). When RA cases were subdivided according to the presence of anticitrulline antibodies, an increased risk associated with exposure to any mineral oil was observed only for anticitrulline-positive RA (relative risk = 1.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-2.2). Analysis of the interaction between oil exposure and the presence of HLA-DR shared epitope genes regarding the incidence of RA indicated that the increased risk associated with exposure to mineral oil was not related to the presence of shared epitope genotypes. In conclusion, our study shows that exposure to mineral oil is associated with an increased risk to develop RF-positive RA and anticitrulline-positive RA, respectively. The findings are of particular interest since the same mineral oils can induce polyarthritis in rats.
PubMed ID
16277683 View in PubMed
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Association of HLA-DRB1, interleukin-6 and cyclin D1 polymorphisms with cervical cancer in the Swedish population--a candidate gene approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149818
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Oct 15;125(8):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2009
Author
Felipe A Castro
Katri Haimila
Inna Sareneva
Markus Schmitt
Justo Lorenzo
Nelli Kunkel
Rajiv Kumar
Asta Försti
Lennart Kjellberg
Göran Hallmans
Matti Lehtinen
Kari Hemminki
Michael Pawlita
Author Affiliation
Division Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2009 Oct 15;125(8):1851-8
Date
Oct-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cervix Uteri - metabolism - pathology
Cyclin D1 - genetics
Female
Genotype
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Interleukin-6 - genetics
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - genetics - virology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection is the major risk factor for cervical cancer (CxCa). The role of genetic susceptibility in the disease has been suggested, but the existing data lack consistency. We conducted a nested case-control study on 973 CxCa cases and 1,763 matched controls, from two Swedish population-based cohorts to examine the association of common genetic variants with CxCa risk. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and 24 other polymorphisms in 14 genes were selected on the basis of reported association or mechanistic plausibility with an HPV infection or cervical cancer development. Genotyping was conducted using multiplex PCR and Luminex technology. A significant association of CxCa with various polymorphisms was observed: rs1800797 in the IL-6 gene (odds ratio [OR] = 0.88, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.79-0.99); rs1041981 in the LTA gene (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.78-0.98), and rs9344 in the CCND1 gene (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02-1.27), for those individuals carrying the rare allele. Additionally, the alleles 0401 and 1501 of the HLA class II DRB1 locus were associated with an increased risk (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.04-1.45 and OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.50, respectively), and allele 1301 was associated with decreased risk (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.47-0.73). The effects of CCND1 and the HLA*DRB1 alleles were independent of the effect of smoking. We did not find any association of risk with polymorphisms in genes related to the innate immune system. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for genetic susceptibility to CxCa due to variations in genes involved in the immune system and in cell cycle.
PubMed ID
19585495 View in PubMed
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Association of IL23R, TNFRSF1A, and HLA-DRB1*0103 allele variants with inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes in the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158286
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008 Aug;14(8):1118-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Maarit Lappalainen
Leena Halme
Ulla Turunen
Päivi Saavalainen
Elisabet Einarsdottir
Martti Färkkilä
Kimmo Kontula
Paulina Paavola-Sakki
Author Affiliation
Research Program for Molecular Medicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008 Aug;14(8):1118-24
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colitis, Ulcerative - genetics
Crohn Disease - genetics
Female
Finland
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - genetics
Male
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptors, Interleukin - genetics
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I - genetics
Toll-Like Receptor 4 - genetics
Abstract
Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), 2 major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are complex disorders with significant genetic predisposition. The first CD-associated gene, CARD15/NOD2, was recently identified and since then several reports on novel IBD candidate genes have emerged. We investigated disease phenotype association to genetic variations in IL23R, ATG16L1, DLG5, ABCB1/MDR1, TLR4, TNFRSF1A, chromosome 5 risk haplotype including SLC22A4 and SLC22A5, and HLA-DRB1*0103 allele among Finnish IBD patients.
A total of 699 IBD patients were genotyped for disease-associated variants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme digestion or Sequenom iPLEX method.
Five markers spanning the IL23R gene were associated with CD. The SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) rs2201841 gave the strongest association (P = 0.002). The rare HLA-DRB1*0103 allele was found to associate with UC (P = 0.008), and the TNFRSF1A A36G variant was associated with familial UC (P = 0.007). Upon phenotypic analysis we detected association between familial UC and rare TNFRSF1A alleles 36G and IVS6+10G (P = 0.001 and P = 0.042, respectively). In addition, IL23R markers were associated with stricturing CD (P = 0.010-0.017), and ileocolonic CD was more prevalent in the carriers of the same 2 TNFRSF1A variants (P = 0.021 and P = 0.028, respectively). Less significant genotype-phenotype associations were observed for the TLR4 and HLA variants.
We were able to replicate the association of the IL23R variants with CD as well as HLA-DRB1*0103 with UC; confirmation of TNFRSF1A association with UC needs additional studies. Our findings also suggest that polymorphisms at IL23R and TNFRSF1A, and possibly HLA and TLR4, loci may account for phenotypic variation in IBD.
PubMed ID
18338763 View in PubMed
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Association of immunoglobulin A deficiency and elevated thyrotropin-receptor autoantibodies in two Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139800
Source
Hum Immunol. 2011 Feb;72(2):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Gudmundur H Jorgensen
Arni E Ornolfsson
Ari Johannesson
Sveinn Gudmundsson
Magdalena Janzi
Ning Wang
Lennart Hammarström
Bjorn R Ludviksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2011 Feb;72(2):166-72
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Autoantibodies - genetics - immunology
Autoimmunity - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Graves Disease - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
HLA-B Antigens - genetics - immunology
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics - immunology
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics - immunology
Humans
Iceland
IgA Deficiency - genetics - immunology
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Radioimmunoassay
Receptors, Thyrotropin - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency, with suggested association with various types of autoimmunity, including Graves' disease. This study investigated the association of IgAD with elevated thyrotropin-receptor autoantibodies (TRAb). IgA was measured in TRAb-seropositive individuals from both Iceland (N = 299] and Sweden (N = 841]. In addition, TRAb levels were evaluated in 43 Icelandic and 50 Swedish IgAD individuals using Medizym TRA immunoassay, and positive samples were re-evaluated using BRAHMS TRAK human RIA. The IgAD individuals were HLA-genotyped to determine the HLA-B, DR, and DQ alleles. None of the 299 Icelandic TRAb-seropositive individuals had IgAD, whereas, a high prevalence of IgAD (14/841 (1:60)) was observed in the Swedish cohort (p = 0.027). The prevalence of TRAb-seropositivity in IgAD individuals was, however, increased in both cohorts. The HLA-DQ6 allele was associated with TRAb-seronegativity within the Icelandic IgAD cohort (p = 0.037). The prevalence of IgAD in TRAb-seropositive individuals in Sweden is 10 times higher than expected in the general population. Furthermore, TRAb seropositivity is common among IgAD individuals, both in Iceland and Sweden, suggesting a predisposition toward Graves' disease. These findings underline the significant association of IgAD with autoimmunity and its possible association with certain HLA-DQ alleles.
PubMed ID
20977916 View in PubMed
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Association of SLC11A1 (NRAMP1) with persistent oligoarticular and polyarticular rheumatoid factor-negative juvenile idiopathic arthritis in Finnish patients: haplotype analysis in Finnish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176677
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jan;52(1):247-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Jonathan A Runstadler
Hanna Säilä
Anneli Savolainen
Marjatta Leirisalo-Repo
Kimmo Aho
Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Michael F Seldin
Author Affiliation
Davis Rowe Program in Human Genetics, University of California-Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2005 Jan;52(1):247-56
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
Arthritis, Juvenile - blood - genetics - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cation Transport Proteins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2
Epitopes
Female
Finland
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics - immunology
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Haplotypes
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Rheumatoid Factor - blood
Abstract
The SLC11A1 (formerly called NRAMP1) gene is important in natural resistance to a variety of intracellular infections mediated by macrophages and has been proposed as a candidate gene for autoimmune disease susceptibility. The aim of this study was to examine susceptibility in Finnish patients with persistent oligoarticular and polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-negative juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) due to the presence of the SLC11A1 locus on chromosome 2.
A total of 234 Finnish JIA nuclear families and 639 elderly Finnish controls without a history of JIA were evaluated for association with JIA at 3 intragenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms: an intragenic insertion/deletion, a promoter microsatellite (NRAMP1), and a 3' microsatellite (D2S1471).
Analysis of marker haplotypes demonstrated a strong association of Finnish JIA with 6-marker, 4-marker, and 2-marker haplotypes. Most impressively, 1 of the 6-marker haplotypes showed an odds ratio (OR) of 4.0 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.6-6.2) in all JIA patients, 3.5 (95% CI 1.9-6.5) in those with persistent oligoarticular JIA, and 4.1 (95% CI 2.5-6.7) in those with polyarticular RF-negative JIA. Stratification of the haplotype data suggested that susceptibility to JIA in the haplotype spanning the SLC11A1 locus is independent (P
PubMed ID
15641099 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.