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Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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BeLieving in Native Girls: characteristics from a baseline assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124562
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Deborah Scott
Aleisha Langhorne
Author Affiliation
Sage Associates, Inc., Houston, TX 77007, USA. dsscott@sageways.com
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):15-36
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - statistics & numerical data
Alaska
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Homeless Youth - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American
Juvenile Delinquency - ethnology - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BeLieving In Native Girls (BLING) is a juvenile delinquency and HIV intervention at a residential boarding school for American Indian/Alaska Native adolescent girls ages 12-20 years. In 2010, 115 participants completed baseline surveys to identify risk and protective factors. Initial findings are discussed regarding a variety of topics, including demographics and general characteristics, academic engagement, home neighborhood characteristics and safety, experience with and perceptions of gang involvement, problem-solving skills, self-esteem, depression, sexual experiences and risk-taking behaviors, substance abuse, and dating violence.
PubMed ID
22569723 View in PubMed
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A cautionary tale: risk reduction strategies among urban American Indian/Alaska Native men who have sex with men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116539
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2013 Feb;25(1):25-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Cynthia R Pearson
Karina L Walters
Jane M Simoni
Ramona Beltran
Kimberly M Nelson
Author Affiliation
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. pearsonc@uw.edu
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 2013 Feb;25(1):25-37
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Condoms - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology - transmission
HIV Seronegativity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Sexual Partners
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Unsafe Sex - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) men who have sex with men (MSM) are considered particularly high risk for HIV transmission and acquisition. In a multi-site cross-sectional survey, 174 AIAN men reported having sex with a man in the past 12 months. We describe harm reduction strategies and sexual behavior by HIV serostatus and seroconcordant partnerships. About half (51.3%) of the respondents reported no anal sex or 100% condom use and 8% were in seroconcordant monogamous partnership. Of the 65 men who reported any sero-adaptive strategy (e.g., 100% seroconcordant partnership, strategic positioning or engaging in any strategy half or most of the time), only 35 (54.7%) disclosed their serostatus to their partners and 27 (41.5%) tested for HIV in the past 3 months. Public health messages directed towards AIAN MSM should continue to encourage risk reduction practices, including condom use and sero-adaptive behaviors. However, messages should emphasize the importance of HIV testing and HIV serostatus disclosure when relying solely on sero-adaptive practices.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23387949 View in PubMed
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Circle of Life HIV/AIDS-prevention intervention for American Indian and Alaska Native youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124561
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):140-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Carol E Kaufman
Anne Litchfield
Edwin Schupman
Christina M Mitchell
Author Affiliation
Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. carol.kaufman@ucdenver.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):140-53
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Culture
Curriculum
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Program Evaluation
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
This article describes the objectives, theoretical bases, development process, and evaluation efforts to-date for the Circle of Life (COL) curricula, HIV/AIDS prevention interventions designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. The curricula are based on Indigenous models of learning and behavior encompassing concepts of Western theories of health behavior change. The curricula underwent extensive national and community review. Subsequent advances include the development of a computer-based version of the intervention.
PubMed ID
22569729 View in PubMed
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Community-based, culturally sensitive HIV/AIDS education for Aboriginal adolescents: implications for nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181598
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Basanti B Majumdar
Tracey L Chambers
Jacqueline Roberts
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit (SLRU), Community-Linked Evaluation AIDS Resource Unit (CLEAR), McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2004 Jan;15(1):69-73
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Educational Measurement
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Safe Sex - ethnology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Sex Education - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior - ethnology
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Abstract
Research is an essential component of effective, evidence-based nursing practice. Limited scientific data have been published on Canadian Aboriginals, and even less information is available on HIV prevention efforts aimed at Aboriginal youth. The need for more research on HIV and AIDS among Aboriginals, and especially Aboriginal youth, is highlighted throughout the article as a means to improving prevention interventions for this vulnerable population. At the same time, insights gained from a culture-sensitive, HIV/AIDS educational program that targeted a group of Aboriginal adolescents from a local First Nations community in Ontario are discussed. Implications for future HIV/AIDS peer-based prevention efforts using the train-the-trainer technique are also considered.
PubMed ID
14768418 View in PubMed
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Differences in sexual risk-taking behavior with state of inebriation in an aboriginal population in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208639
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1997 May;58(3):312-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
T. Myers
S L Bullock
L M Calzavara
R. Cockerill
V W Marshall
Author Affiliation
Faculty of medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1997 May;58(3):312-22
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - ethnology - psychology
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Ethanol - adverse effects
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Sexual Behavior - drug effects
Abstract
This article describes the self-reported use of substances, participation in unprotected intercourse and differences in sexual risk-taking behavior with state of inebriation among a group of aboriginal (First Nations) people in Ontario. And, in so doing, attempts to answer some of the questions about the association between the use of alcohol and sexual risk taking in this population.
The project was developed in a partnership between an aboriginal steering committee and university researchers. Data were collected via interview from 658 randomly selected status First Nations people living within 11 reserve communities in the province.
Of the 426 individuals included in the within subject analysis 9.6% reported variation in their participation in sex, 13.8% variation in their participation in intercourse and 10.3% variation in their participation in unprotected intercourse with inebriation. An examination of individual behavior across "sober" and "drunk or high" states showed that there were almost equal proportions of respondents who only participated in unsafe sex when sober and respondents who only participated in unsafe sex when drunk or high. Where significant differences occurred, individuals were more likely to report a shift towards no sex or no intercourse with inebriation, not towards unprotected intercourse.
Since a large proportion of individuals in this study engage in unprotected intercourse, the small proportion of individuals reporting different sexual behavior were more likely to report participation in a safe activity rather than an unsafe activity while "drunk or high." Stereotypes and assumptions may lead educators and researchers to feel the need to focus their messages on the relationship between drug and alcohol consumption and unsafe sex; however, the amount of unsafe sexual intercourse that occurs only while individuals are inebriated suggests that this focus is not of principal concern.
PubMed ID
9130224 View in PubMed
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Factors behind HIV testing practices among Canadian Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144229
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Mar;22(3):324-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Treena R Orchard
Eric Druyts
Colin W McInnes
Ken Clement
Erin Ding
Kimberly A Fernandes
Aranka Anema
Viviane D Lima
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Mar;22(3):324-31
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Government Programs
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with HIV testing among Aboriginal peoples in Canada who live off-reserve. Data were drawn for individuals aged 15-44 from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (2001), which represents a weighed sample of 520,493 Aboriginal men and women living off-reserve. Bivariable analysis and logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with individuals who had received an HIV test within the past year. In adjusted multivariable analysis, female gender, younger age, unemployment, contact with a family doctor or traditional healer within the past year, and "good" or "fair/poor" self-rated health increased the odds of HIV testing. Completion of high-school education, rural residency, and less frequent alcohol and cigarette consumption decreased the odds of HIV testing. A number of differences emerged when the sample was analyzed by gender, most notably females who self-reported "good" or "fair/poor" health status were more likely to have had an HIV test, yet males with comparable health status were less likely to have had an HIV test. Additionally, frequent alcohol consumption and less than high-school education was associated with an increased odds of HIV testing among males, but not females. Furthermore, while younger age was associated with an increased odds of having an HIV test in the overall model, this was particularly relevant for females aged 15-24. These outcomes provide evidence of the need for improved HIV testing strategies to reach greater numbers of Aboriginal peoples living off-reserve. They also echo the long-standing call for culturally appropriate HIV-related programming while drawing new attention to the importance of gender and age, two factors that are often generalized under the rubric of culturally relevant or appropriate program development.
PubMed ID
20390512 View in PubMed
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The Feather of Hope Aboriginal AIDS Prevention Society: a community approach to HIV/AIDS prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211546
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):268-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
J E Mill
D A DesJardins
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):268-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a complex and challenging issue for Aboriginal people in Canada. There is a need for HIV/AIDS prevention programs that address the specific needs of Canadian Aboriginal communities in a culturally accepted manner. The Feather of Hope Aboriginal AIDS Prevention Society provides culturally sensitive HIV prevention programs to Aboriginal communities in Alberta. The community development approach used by the Society emphasizes empowerment at the individual and group level. This approach is congruent with the shift to self-determination by Aboriginal people throughout Canada.
PubMed ID
8870307 View in PubMed
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Five conversations: reflections of stakeholders on the impact of the ethnocultural communities facing AIDS study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212053
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87 Suppl 1:S44-8, S49-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Willms
R. Bhatia
J. Lowe
F. Niemi
D. Stewart
J. Westmoreland-Traore
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 May-Jun;87 Suppl 1:S44-8, S49-53
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - ethnology
Canada
Ethnic Groups
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - transmission
Health education
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Motivation
Program Evaluation
Research Design
Abstract
This paper reports on issues identified in conversations held between one of the Ethnocultural Communities Facing AIDS Study (ECFA) investigators and five stakeholders associated with this experiment in collaborative and participatory research. The stakeholders reflect on their experiences in partnering with university-based researchers, resistance in ethnocultural communities to being researched, and the next steps implicated by the research in question. The problem of HIV/AIDS in ethnocultural communities in Canada is, relative to the mainstream, also viewed as a symbol of disadvantage in these communities. The stakeholders suggest that to address these deeper concerns, there must be vital, dynamic, and enduring communication between researchers, community representatives, and government at all levels, in the process of identifying solutions and implementing them in the present.
PubMed ID
8705924 View in PubMed
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HIV and ethnicity in Canada: is the HIV risk-taking behaviour of young foreign-born MSM similar to Canadian born MSM?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166347
Source
AIDS Care. 2007 Jan;19(1):9-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
C. George
M. Alary
R S Hogg
J. Otis
R S Remis
B. Mâsse
B. Turmel
R. Leclerc
R. Lavoie
J. Vincelette
R. Parent
K. Chan
S. Martindale
M L Miller
K J P Craib
M T Schechter
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
AIDS Care. 2007 Jan;19(1):9-16
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - ethnology
Cohort Studies
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Unsafe Sex - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
There is a dearth of information on the HIV risk-taking behaviour of foreign-born men who have sex with men (MSM) in Canada. This study focused on identifying sexual risk behaviour among MSM who immigrated to Canada and compared them to MSM who were born in Canada. Baseline data from the Omega Cohort in Montreal and the Vanguard Project in Vancouver were combined to form four ethnicity/race analytical categories (n = 1,148): White born in Canada (WBIC), White born outside of Canada, non-White born in Canada (NBIC) and non-White born outside of Canada (NBOC). Psychological, demographic and sexual behaviour characteristics of the groups were similar except: NBOC were more likely to be unemployed, less likely to be tattooed, had fewer bisexual experiences and less likely worried of insufficient funds. WBOC were more likely to report unprotected sex with seropositives and more likely to have had unprotected sex while travelling. NBIC were more likely to have ever sold sex and to have had body piercing. WBOC are at high risk of acquiring as well as transmitting HIV. It is important to consider place of birth in addition to ethnicity when developing programmes to prevent the transmission of HIV.
PubMed ID
17129852 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.