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Adaptive evolution of HIV at HLA epitopes is associated with ethnicity in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123483
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e36933
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Manon Ragonnet-Cronin
Stéphane Aris-Brosou
Isabelle Joanisse
Harriet Merks
Dominic Vallee
Kyna Caminiti
Paul Sandstrom
James Brooks
Author Affiliation
National HIV and Retrovirology Laboratories, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(5):e36933
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - genetics
Adult
Alleles
Canada - ethnology
Epitopes - immunology
Evolution, Molecular
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - immunology - virology
HIV-1 - genetics - pathogenicity
HLA Antigens - genetics - immunology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Selection, Genetic
Young Adult
Abstract
Host immune selection pressure influences the development of mutations that allow for HIV escape. Mutation patterns induced in HIV by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are HLA-allele specific. As ethnic groups have distinct and characteristic HLA allele frequencies, we can expect divergent viral evolution within ethnicities. Here, we have sequenced and analyzed the HIV pol gene from 1248 subtype B infected, treatment-na?ve individuals in Canada. Phylogenetic analysis showed no separation between pol sequences from five self-identified ethnic groups, yet fixation index (F(ST)) values showed significant divergence between ethnicities. A total of 17 amino acid sites showed an ethnic-specific fixation pattern (0.015
Notes
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PubMed ID
22693560 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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The Ahalaya case-management program for HIV-infected American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians: quantitative and qualitative evaluation of impacts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2999
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
P D Bouey
B E Druan
Author Affiliation
The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, 436 14th Street, Suite 1020, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Paulbouey@nnaapc.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Case Management - organization & administration
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Hawaii - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - standards
Abstract
The Ahalaya case management model was designed to provide culturally sensitive services to HIV-positive American Indians (AI), Alaska Natives (AN), and Native Hawaiians (NH). This program started in 1991 and expanded across the country in 1994. The evaluation plan included a client satisfaction survey, along with focus groups and key informant interviews. Of the 389 active clients enrolled, 132 responded to the anonymous 35-item questionnaire. Responses were favorable regarding benefits of the programs. Self-reported quality of life changes after enrollment also were significantly improved (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: T=6.87, p=.000; n=131). Qualitative data highlighted other important issues. Social relationships-with staff, community, and family-were critical to client welfare, as a source of both strength and fear. While AI/AN/NH case management programs have been shown effective, services need to expand, and they have to facilitate resolutions to problems in clients social relationships.
PubMed ID
11279557 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native drug users and sexually transmitted disease: results of a five-year study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3064
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
D G Fisher
A M Fenaughty
D M Paschane
H H Cagle
Author Affiliation
IVDU Project ESB-207, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):47-57
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology
Counseling
Crack Cocaine
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although Alaska has one of the highest rates of alcohol consumption in the U.S., there are very few reports of other drug use in Alaska. This five-year NIDA-funded study sampled out-of-treatment injection drug users (IDUs) and crack cocaine smokers in Anchorage, Alaska. This paper is a summary of results comparing risk behavior for HIV and sexually transmitted disease infection among Alaska Natives (n=216) to non-Natives (primarily Blacks n=394 and Whites n=479) from this study. IDUs and crack cocaine smokers were recruited using a targeted sampling plan. All subjects tested positive to cocaine metabolites, or morphine, using urinalysis, or had visible track marks. Several analyses of this database have indicated that Alaska Native women are at high risk for gonorrhea infection. They are also at risk for HIV infection due to high rates of behavior related to blood-borne disease transmission. We have also found that White men who have sex with both White and Alaska Native women are significantly less likely to use condoms with the Alaska Native women. HIV preventive education efforts aimed at Alaska Native women need to be implemented on a major scale.
PubMed ID
11279553 View in PubMed
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Alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission among American Indian and Alaska Native drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3002
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
J A Baldwin
C J Maxwell
A M Fenaughty
R T Trotter
S J Stevens
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Physical Education, Exercise Science and Nutrition, NAU P.O. Box 15095, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA. Julie.Baldwin@nau.edu
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(1):1-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - psychology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Crack Cocaine
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - transmission
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk-Taking
Safe Sex - psychology
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - ethnology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
Quantitative alcohol interviews conducted as part of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Native American Supplement revealed very high rates of alcohol use among American Indian and Alaska Native active crack and injection drug users (IDUs). Of 147 respondents who completed the alcohol questionnaire, 100& percent had drunk alcohol within the past month, almost 42& percent reported that they drank every day, and 50& percent drank until they were drunk one-half of the time or more. Injection drug users (IDUs) demonstrated the highest frequency and quantity of alcohol use in the past 30 days. A significant positive association was also found between crack and alcohol use in the past 48 hours (c(2)=5.30, p
PubMed ID
11279550 View in PubMed
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Alcohol/drug exposure, HIV-related sexual risk among urban American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: evidence from a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130730
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler
Malembe S Ebama
Author Affiliation
Texas/Oklahoma AIDS Education and Training Center, Parkland Health and Hospital Systems, Dallas, USA. srmikl@parknet.pmh.org
Source
J Sch Health. 2011 Nov;81(11):671-9
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcoholism - ethnology
Condoms - utilization
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - psychology
Male
Risk-Taking
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Migration of the native populations from reservations to the urban areas has resulted in mixed ethnicities of American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) children. Minority youth require special attention and services in urban schools as they disproportionately experience poverty, low educational attainment, unemployment, and single-parent status.
We used 2005 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data to examine alcohol/drug use patterns and their association with sexual risk taking among AIAN only (single-racial) and biracial youth in combination with White, African American, or Hispanic ethnicities (N = 1178).
Overall, one half of the students were sexually active, with significantly higher rates among males; AIAN-Black students initiated sex earlier than the other groups. Condom nonuse is higher among AIAN-Whites (>50%) compared to one third of AIAN-Hispanics and one fourth of AIAN-Blacks. Nearly 10% of all students, except AIAN-Blacks, reported lifetime use of heroin/meth. Sexual behavior was significantly associated with episodic drinking. Students with Hispanic background have twice the odds of being sexually active compared to AIANs.
Our findings underscore growing health care needs and targeted prevention initiatives for mixed racial underserved native youth. Urban school settings have potential to deliver services and offer alcohol/drug prevention programs to address the needs of mixed racial native urban youth. Using the School Based Health Clinic model has been successful; we need to reform prevention approaches to accommodate needs of multiracial urban native youth.
PubMed ID
21972987 View in PubMed
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Barriers to HIV care: an exploration of the complexities that influence engagement in and utilization of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139011
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2010;49(10):934-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mary A Cavaleri
Kosta Kalogerogiannis
Mary M McKay
Laura Vitale
Erika Levi
Sian Jones
Fran Wallach
Erin Flynn
Author Affiliation
New York State Psychiatric Institute, 100 Haven Avenue #31D, New York, NY 10032, USA. cavaleri@pi.cpmc.columbia.edu
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2010;49(10):934-45
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans - psychology
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Comorbidity
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
New York City - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Poverty
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
This study is an exploration of engagement in outpatient medical care, medication utilization, and barriers to treatment utilization among 24 predominantly low-income, ethnic minority adults who were admitted to an urban hospital for HIV-related illnesses. A semi-structured interview was administered during the sample's hospital stay to explore patterns of service use and identify barriers to care. The majority of the sample was connected to an outpatient provider and satisfied with the care they received; however, most missed treatment appointments and skipped medication dosages. Health and treatment-related barriers, competing demands, and co-occurring mental health symptoms and illicit substance use were identified as barriers to care. Multiple obstacles indigenous to the individual, their treatment, and the environment prevented consistent treatment use among an economically disadvantaged ethnic minority sample: Implications and future directions in engaging vulnerable populations into health care for HIV are discussed.
PubMed ID
21113849 View in PubMed
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Behavioral and Clinical Characteristics of American Indian/Alaska Native Adults in HIV Care - Medical Monitoring Project, United States, 2011-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297351
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019 Jan 04; 67(5152):1405-1409
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-04-2019
Author
Amy R Baugher
Linda Beer
Heather M Bradley
Mary E Evans
Qingwei Luo
R Luke Shouse
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019 Jan 04; 67(5152):1405-1409
Date
Jan-04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Retroviral Agents - therapeutic use
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Treatment Outcome
United States
Viral Load - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The rate of diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in 2016 (10.2 per 100,000 population) was the fourth highest among seven racial/ethnic groups in the United States (1); the number of diagnoses of HIV infection among AI/AN persons increased by 70%, from 143 in 2011 to 243 in 2016 (1). However, little has been published about the sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics of AI/AN patients with HIV infection in care because small sample sizes have led to infrequent analysis of AI/AN-specific estimates (2) and because of underestimation of AI/AN race/ethnicity in surveillance and other data sources (3). CDC analyzed data from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a surveillance system that collects information about the experiences and needs of persons with diagnosed HIV infection, collected during 2011-2015 among AI/AN adults receiving HIV medical care. The results indicated that 64% of AI/AN patients with HIV infection in care achieved sustained viral suppression, and 76% achieved viral suppression at their most recent viral load test within the past 12 months, which is below the national HIV prevention goal of 80%, but comparable to or better than some other racial/ethnic groups (4). Based on self-report, 51% of AI/AN patients with HIV infection had incomes at or below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) annual poverty limit, 27% had symptoms of depression, 78% reported internalized HIV-related stigma, and 20% reported binge drinking in the past 30 days. To improve the health of AI/AN patients with HIV infection, it is important that health care providers, tribal organizations, and state and local health departments consider the sociodemographic and behavioral barriers to AI/AN patients with HIV infection achieving viral suppression and design care plans that seek to eliminate those barriers.
PubMed ID
30605445 View in PubMed
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Behavioural risks for HIV infection among Quebec residents of Haitian origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143883
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2010 Dec;12(6):894-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Alix Adrien
Joseph Cox
Pascale Leclerc
Jean-François Boivin
Chris Archibald
David Boulos
Joseph Jean-Gilles
Gabriel Joseph
Claude Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Public Health Department, Agence de la Santé et des Services Sociaux de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. aadrien@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2010 Dec;12(6):894-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - transmission
Haiti - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Risk-Taking
Young Adult
Abstract
Quebecers of Haitian origin (QHO) have the highest HIV prevalence of all immigrant groups in the province. We conducted a study among QHO to document the behavioural risk factors for HIV transmission. Male respondents were significantly more likely than female respondents to have at least one casual heterosexual partner in the past 12 months (39.7 vs. 18.8%, p
PubMed ID
20432067 View in PubMed
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81 records – page 1 of 9.