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Canadian health minister releases new initiative to address HIV/AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176110
Source
AIDS Policy Law. 2005 Jan 28;20(2):1, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2005

The silence not as powerful in Sweden. Interview by Valerie Michele Hoskins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7450
Source
Body Posit. 1998 Oct;11(10):28-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B. Falkenstrom
Source
Body Posit. 1998 Oct;11(10):28-33
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Health education
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
National Health Programs
Patient Advocacy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Bertil Falkenstrom, President of RFHP, which is an organization of support groups for Swedish people with HIV, discusses what life is like for HIV-positive individuals in Sweden. Under the Communicable Diseases Act, all doctor visits are free for Swedish citizens and residents who are HIV-positive. Medication is subsidized, so a patient will never pay more than $150 per year on medication. There are also counseling services available through the public insurance agency to supplement physical treatment. Despite encouragement to return to work, Falkenstrom cites discrimination in the workplace as a challenge for HIV-positive employees. Discrimination is also prevalent toward immigrant populations with HIV, especially Blacks from African countries. RFHP has difficulty designing informational programs to suit these groups, and since HIV-positive immigrants fear discrimination among their own peers, they don't readily participate in developing these programs. Individuals that are tested may remain anonymous, however, they must identify themselves to their doctors, who are required to report it. Partner notification is also handled discretely through counselors or social workers, but this method does not appear efficient.
PubMed ID
11365911 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1994 Sep 15;151(6):743-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1994
Author
C. Hankins
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Sep 15;151(6):743-5
Date
Sep-15-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis
Canada - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Health Policy
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Male
Personal Health Services
Prevalence
Prisons
Public Opinion
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Feb 3;269(5):633-48421369
Cites: AIDS. 1992 Jul;6(7):623-81503681
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Mar;87(3):405-161559039
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Jul;79(7):840-22735469
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1989 Aug 19;15(33):168-702766390
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Dec 1;143(11):1187-922224695
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Nov 1;143(9):885-932224716
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 1991 Autumn;12(3):278-3231744235
Cites: Can Dis Wkly Rep. 1991 Oct 26;17(43):233-51751978
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):8137697573
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):812-37697572
Comment On: CMAJ. 1994 Sep 15;151(6):781-78087754
PubMed ID
7755688 View in PubMed
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2nd-generation HIV surveillance and injecting drug use: uncovering the epidemiological ice-berg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84543
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Reintjes Ralf
Wiessing Lucas
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Faculty Life Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg, Germany. Ralf.Reintjes@rzbd.haw-hamburg.de
Source
Int J Public Health. 2007;52(3):166-72
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Europe - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Turkey - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: HIV/AIDS surveillance methods are under revision as the diversity of HIV epidemics is becoming more apparent. The so called "2nd generation surveillance (SGS) systems" aim to enhance surveillance by broadening the range of indicators to prevalence, behaviors and correlates, for a better understanding and a more complete and timely awareness of evolving epidemics. METHODS: Concepts of HIV SGS are reviewed with a special focus on injecting drug users, a major at-risk and hard to reach group in Europe, a region with mainly low or concentrated epidemics. RESULTS: The scope of HIV/AIDS surveillance needs to be broadened following principles of SGS. Specifically for IDUs we propose including hepatitis C data as indicator for injecting risk in routine systems like those monitoring sexually transmitted infections and information on knowledge and attitudes as potential major determinants of risk behavior. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested approach should lead to more complete and timely information for public health interventions, however there is a clear need for comparative validation studies to assess the validity, reliability and cost-effectiveness of traditional and enhanced HIV/AIDS surveillance systems.
PubMed ID
17958283 View in PubMed
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The HIV care continuum among men who have sex with men in Moscow, Russia: a cross-sectional study of infection awareness and engagement in care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274281
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2016 Mar;92(2):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
A L Wirtz
C E Zelaya
C. Latkin
A. Peryshkina
N. Galai
V. Mogilniy
P. Dzhigun
I. Kostetskaya
S H Mehta
C. Beyrer
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2016 Mar;92(2):161-7
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Moscow - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Partners
Abstract
Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection is critical to improving clinical outcomes for HIV-infected individuals. We sought to characterise the HIV care continuum and identify correlates of being unaware of one's HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Moscow, Russia.
Participants (N=1376) were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and completed a sociobehavioural survey and HIV testing from 2010 to 2013. Sample and population estimates were calculated for key steps along the HIV care continuum for HIV-infected MSM and logistic regression methods were used to examine correlates of being unaware of one's HIV infection.
15.6% (184/1177; population estimate: 11.6%; 95% CI 8.5% to 14.7%) of participants were HIV infected. Of these, only 23.4% (43/184; population estimate: 13.2; 95% CI 11.0 to 15.4) were previously aware of their infection, 8.7% (16/184 population estimate: 4.7; 95% CI 1.0 to 8.5) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 4.4% (8/164; population estimate: 3.0; 95% CI 0.3 to 5.6) reported an undetectable viral load. Bisexual identity (reference: homosexual; adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.69; 95% CI 1.19 to 11.43), having =5 sexual partners in the last 6 months (reference: =1; AOR: 4.23; 95% CI 1.17 to 15.28), and employer HIV testing requirements (reference: no; AOR: 15.43; 95% CI 1.62 to 147.01) were associated with being unaware of one's HIV infection. HIV testing in a specialised facility (reference: private; AOR: 0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.53) and testing =2 times in the last 12 months (reference: none; AOR: 0.17; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.73) were inversely associated with being unaware of HIV infection.
There is a steep gradient along the HIV care continuum for Moscow-based MSM beginning with low awareness of HIV infection. Efforts that improve access to acceptable HIV testing strategies, such as alternative testing facilities, and linkage to care are needed for key populations.
PubMed ID
26297721 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.